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EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Need to be tough on crime but don't have the budget for even more prisons? Just create an unlimited police state, online!:

http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/5451/135/

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EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



DropDeadRed posted:

So are you saying that switching from Rogers cable over to Teksavvy cable will not get me around any P2P throttling that they do? (I know it gets past the monthly bandwidth cap.... at least until Rogers files that UBB)

I routinely max my Teksavvy cable when using bittorrent, and while Rogers certainly has the ability to implement throttling for TPIA customers, they haven't yet. Switching from Rogers to Teksavvy should remove any traffic shaping currently on your connection.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



lucky13pjn posted:

When I was looking around for other ISP's the last time I switched and when UBB was going to be implemented, Cogeco always seemed to have a much shittier selection of packages than everyone else. Teksavvy's website says my postal code (in Oakville) is in their cable coverage area, but I thought that was only available where Rogers was available.

Teksavvy partnered with Cogeco as well (and Videotron in Quebec). Their postal code checker isn't perfect, but give them a call and they can check out your location and tell you for sure.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Dudebro posted:

When was this? I called them earlier this week and Teksavvy couldn't hook me up because I'm in a Cogeco area even though I could walk outside for five minutes and hit a Rogers-connected house.

Crap, I thought they'd signed with Cogeco, but it turns out not:
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r25114737-Cable-CABLE-STATUS-February-17th

Sorry.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Nomenklatura posted:

Why IS that, anyway? You'd think they'd just rent the things.

No facilities to track the cable modems (Rogers tools don't show this to them), too much administrative hassle to collect and refurbish modems from people who cancel the service, way to difficult to deal with people who just stop paying.

Rogers and Bell can manage it because they have other services which depend on it (set top box, phone, etc) so adding another device is very low cost.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Alctel posted:

Going to join up with TekSavvy it looks like

What cable modem should I go for, the Motorola SB5101N or the Thomson DCM475?

DCM475.

You want *at least* a DOCSIS 3.0 compatible cable modem, and the SB5101N is not.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



thexerox123 posted:

Am I wrong, or doesn't Rogers have to give the wholesalers like TekSavvy access to the same speeds that they offer? Why is Rogers trying to sell me on 32 Mbps service when I can only get up to 15 with the TekSavvy cable that I have?

The CRTC needs to decide on pricing for a tier, based on submissions from the provider and the resaler. They've done this for basic tiers, and have until December 31st 2011 for all other tiers.

Also, tiers are set by their 'name', not their speed. Rogers is upping their 15 mbits offering to 24 mbit, and Teksavvy users are getting the same bump for free. (also, 10 to 15 for all userS)

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



DarkJC posted:

How come TekSavvy Cable upload speeds are so anemic? I'm assuming this is something they're limited to by Rogers?

1mbit seems kind of pathetic when I'm getting 28 down. I'm not asking for synchronous here, but you'd think 2mbit up would be the minimum these days.

For cable providers, and somewhat but less so for DSL, all the costs are in the upstream channel. The transmitting equipment is the end users modem, which is going to be lower cost, lower power, less efficient, and much 'noiser' than head end equipment. The upstream channel must therefore be quieter and 'wider' than the downstream channels. Most users also favour downloading heavily over uploading, and the end result is that only a small amount of the available spectrum is allocated for 'upstream' usage, and it costs a lot of money to allocate more of it to less users, because you have to cut the users up into smaller and smaller groups.

Rogers is just being cheap, really, but the DOCSIS standard also doesn't offer a lot of cost effective solutions here. Teksavvy can only offer plans that Rogers offers (by law) and is doing what it can.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Why is it so difficult to find more options for business internet that just cable/dsl resellers?

If anybody knows any ISPs in the Toronto/North York area that do business connectivity with symmetric speeds in the 20 to 50mbit range, please do tell me. They don't seem to be as easy to find as I would have thought.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Sprawl posted:

They do let you use your own if its on their supported list of modems

This is true for ADSL/ADSL2, but for all VDSL speeds, you are required to use (buy or pay rental on) a Bell modem, either a Sagemcom if you are on a 7330 based line, or a Cellpipe if you are on a Stinger based line.

If you are on a 7330 based line, you can use other VDSL modems with some success, but you *still* need to rent (or buy) the modem from Bell as part of the activation process.

This probably will get knocked over via the CRTC or courts eventually, but that's at least 2 years away. Teksavvy is also trying to work with Bell about getting a less locked down firmware for the modems, but there is no timeline on that.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Migishu posted:

It has a section for downloads, uploads, and total. Downloads specifically say 4gb, uploads about 68mb (which is about correct)

Yesterday has the same problem, my router says 7.4gb downloaded, while TekSavvy's meter shows i used 8.5gb

Also, the meter specifically states 1024kb = 1mb

It's weird because some days show that they're correct, but others show that they have a huge variant in bandwidth.

Teksavvy may be 'breaking' days using a different timezone maybe? Or counting a download that was started on a certain day as all on that day, even if it continued into the next day.

I'd send them a support email and ask when the day rollover happens.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Sprawl posted:

The cable is better if only because you can upgrade speeds and you dont get a bad modem you get a nice docsis 3 modem so it will last some time.

Nope. Rogers just released new speed tiers all require a cable modem that can bond 24 downstream channels and 8 upstream channels. No modem that meets these requirements has been approved for third party providers (the best is currently 8 down 8 up). Rogers uses a Hitron 24x8 modem for its own customers, but requires custom firmware that also isn't available to third parties (who can't buy that modem anyway).

EoRaptor fucked around with this message at 15:49 on Apr 23, 2014

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Sprawl posted:

In shaw areas you use a docsis 3 modem because i have shaw And i got shipped out a DCM475 which are very nice modems.

DariusLikewise posted:

I doubt Rogers even has 24 downstream channel available for bonding yet. Probably won't have the bandwith until they switch cable service to IPTV.

It isn't a technical necessity, Rogers is just making it a requirement in order to cost the third party guys a bunch of money and hassle with their customers. Other cable companies can do what they want.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Oxyclean posted:

Is this the right place to say "gently caress Rogers"? Because I went to check their packages to see if anything had changed, making me eligible for a better bandwidth cap or something, and they've changed all their packages to "Hybrid Fibre" - I can't really tell what's different from the packages they offered a few months to a year ago, besides the name, price increase and possibly a cap reduction?

Also, whoever thought overage charges in the realm of 1$-2$ per Gig are reasonable in any way should burn in the fiery pits of hell.

Marketing. People are starting to think of 'fibre' as the future of internet, so playing up to this is going to be a thing from now on.

Also, if they can convince the CRTC that Hybrid Fibre is anew product, they can avoid the TPIA requirements for it, and then use it to close the door on independents.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



infernal machines posted:

It also refers to the hybrid fibre coax nodes they use. Basically it's fibre to your neighbourhood node, then coax cable to the demarc.

Right now the independents do have access to it. I have a 150/15 package from Teksavvy that uses an HFC node.

Yes, and Hybrid Fibre-Coax has been around for decades, and I don't think there is anywhere in the Rogers plant where it isn't in use. This new usage of the term is 100% branding/marketing, nothing more.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



spoof posted:

Well that didn't take the shitheels long:

Remember that the Voltage court case made it so the wording of any communication that is sent to end users must be approved by ISP's. An ISP that passes on such false information would probably find itself in hot water in any resulting court case, so expect boilerplate notices like this to never actually make it to consumers.

I know, for instance, Teksavvy has rejected this template as being false and misleading.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Armor-Piercing posted:

Changing packages doesn't require a technician to come by or anything, right? Assuming my current modem is sufficient and everything.

I got that email too, going from 28/1 300GB at $49 to 28/1 400GB at $53, but I just looked at the packages they offer in my area and at some point they added 30/5 400GB for $55, so I might as well just switch to that.

It depends. Rogers no longer accepts service changes for certain older models of modem, and if you have one of those, you are stuck with your current service until you purchase a new modem.

This is a change Rogers imposed on all their TPIA customers, it's not just Teksavvy.

If you are in this boat (check the teksavvy website for a list) I'd recommend waiting. Rogers is in the process of changing the modem requirements again, and a good bunch of the currently approved modems will drop of the list. They've been stalling on approving the new modems however, because they can use this to cut off TPIA access to higher tiers. New modems should finally get approved in a month or two, though.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Bloody Hedgehog posted:

I was a bit old at the time for the YTV PJ's, but anyone remember Sugar? That girl with the ultra-high voice who was all sugar and spice and girly and forever young?

I worked with a guy who was dating her at the time, and he always regaled us with endless stories of his sloppy, dirty bone-down sessions with her, and she did the voice during it.

Probably true. When she was a guest at AN, she spent her nights in the 24 hour hentai room. Often with other guests...

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Shumagorath posted:

It looks like DD-WRT's PPPoE numbers for the R7000's current firmware were correct. When I plug my desktop into the HomeHub I get the advertised speed of 950/100. Even Astraweb is hitting a solid 50MB/sec.

I really don't want to give Bell visibility of my home LAN so I might just live with the slower speed until there's a firmware fix. Here's hoping the speed improves when I reconnect it :(

Try the R7000 with vendor firmware. It's a long known issue that dd-wrt (and any third party firmware) isn't as efficient as the vendor supplied stuff simply because it can't use all the features available in the hardware. If you want open firmware and those speeds, you'll need to look at Microtik.

Also, usb to ethernet adapters rely on the cpu to decode/encode frames, and have huge overhead. You'll never see anything close to gigabit speed on them, no matter what the underlying specs say is possible.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



unknown posted:

Nothing good/concrete. Sites that have GigaFibe are generally new developments and condos (ie: where there's no preexisting copper/POTS lines to migrate).

Since Bell is using Hydro's poles now for it in most areas, you can tell if the neighbourhood is even going to be capable by seeing if the new extra high power poles are installed.

Bell is actively targeting wealthy neighborhoods as well, even creating checkerboard patterns where they don't offer services to areas completely surrounded by areas getting service, with no geography that would prevent deployment.

While Bell is a business and will thus behave to maximize profit, they get a huge advantage from favorable right of way access and such behavior should be investigated and corrective action forced.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



unknown posted:

Now days anybody can get RoW access on public lands, it just costs a huge amount of money upfront (bonds, contracts, gear and staffing), so newcomers aren't likely to do it in existing areas. Sometimes it's just easier/cheaper to do it via a 3rd party, which even is what Bell is doing in this case (using Hydro poles). Basically municipalities have woken up to the clusterfuck it used to be for RoW access and the new income stream and now are charging huge $ and are making sure you've got the capability to fix the gently caress ups. (ie: storm damage and the like causing your cable/pole/hole/etc to close a street).

Bells advantage is they can use any existing right of way they have for this, and they have a huge, huge number of them, built almost all at the public expense.

This is way such targeted tactics should be rejected. And yes, it's pretty easy to have an assessment done of an area that borders any other serviced area on two or more sides and request Bell to explain what, precisely, is stopping them from deploying and offering services there. Is the CRTC likely to do this? Maybe. They've been coming around more and more that Bell/Rogers/Telus/Shaw aren't very honest and have been demanding more open access out of them. It all gets bogged down in endless litigation, which is all about exhausting their competitors, not offering better product, but that's the way things are currently structured in this country.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



EngineerJoe posted:

I'm on TSi with the 45/4 400gig plan currently with zap the cap enabled (Unlimited instead of 400gigs but with reduced peak time speeds). I just upgraded to 45/4/unlimited for $79.99. What's annoying is that the 100/10/unlimited plan is only $3 more per month but then I'd need spend $130 more on a new modem. Sigh :(

ZtC was discontinued anyway, and could no longer be used beyond Feb.

This recent series of outages is really annoying, because Rogers claims there is nothing wrong on their end, and Teksavvy is unable to see anything on their end that is the cause, traffic on the link just dies away. It's so bad Teksavvy is asking customers to run traceroutes and poo poo during the ;outage' to show it's on the Rogers side.

The whole thing is really bizarre, and because the CRTC didn't mandate any sort of SLA, and also limited contact to a single email address, with no escalation or recourse outside of petitioning the CRTC.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



37th Chamber posted:

Going to stop you right there, it's still a terrible system by any definition of the word.

100% this.

The CRTC failed to understand any part of what was necessary to achieve their stated goals, and in each 'hearing' went wholesale with the incumbents information, ignoring or preventing the TPIA clients challenges to it.

They've also reversed themselves, starting by forcing the switch to aggregated, then forcing a switch back to dis-aggregated. This has monstrous costs for TPIA's, and created the huge single points of failure we are now seeing.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Mister Macys posted:

The exchange rate is CAD $1.25 per USD.
The base price for a game in America is $60.
We're actually paying above what the exchange rate would indicate (33% more).

We're just easy to gently caress. :shobon:

We also have a tax base that supports universal healthcare and other social welfare policies. We get taken advantage of* but not all of the higher price is pure profit taking.

* We also protect our distributors and wholesalers from competition much more strongly than the U.S. does, though this is turning into net bad, not a net good, as the system fails to adapt to technology changes.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



A c E posted:

So far, I've received 3 more adverts since that message. I have very little faith that they will actually stop them this time as well. It sucks because Canada Post can't do anything and I can't find anyone else to complain to about it. I supposedly stopped all the unaddressed adverts for my postal code, but I don't get those anyways so who knows if they were lying about that as well.

I don't know if this will help, but there might be another course of action for you.

For each envelope that arrives, cover or otherwise obscure thepostal code on it (sharpie is fine), write 'MOVED - NFA' on it in big block letter, and drop it in the nearest mailbox.

It costs about 85 cents to send a piece of bulk mail, but it costs between 2 and 2.50 to process the return, and this cost is passed to the sender. If Rogers is sending them directly, they may not care, but it's much more likely they are using a third party fulfillment house. That third party company is paid a flat rate, and will manage returns internally because they directly affect the profit they make.

If you can get the fulfillment house to kill your address, it'll stay dead no matter what Rogers does. It'll take a good few months of doing this to have any effect, though, and some contracts pass those return costs back to the originator, so there is a chance that it won't make any difference at all beyond costing rogers more money.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



w00tmonger posted:

Is it the sort of thing where you tape a rock to them and return to sender?

No, that's just abusive of canada post, nothing will come of it from the fulfillment house.
Canada post equipment will spit out any envelope without a readable postal code, and it'll be manually processed. When the processing person sees the moved - nfa message, they will put the address into a database which is passed back to the sender, the letter itself is usually shredded. Canada post bills for this service, how much is charged depends on how far away the return is from the point of origin, and how well integrated the fulfillment house is with canada posts process. It can add up quickly, especially if you are getting 3+ a month.

Mailings can also be flagged for guaranteed return, so the envelope is always returned intact to the sender, this is mostly for bills, credit cards, government info, etc. Some areas also aren't setup for electronic return, and the envelope will be returned no matter what, but that's becoming more rare.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Constellation I posted:

I was hoping for more of a seamless transition and better support from TekSavvy, but I guess they're too big now for all that.

Anyway, like 2 weeks ago, I put in a change request to upgrade to the 100/10 plan, fully expecting to needing to buy a new modem. 3 days pass and they immediately closed the request, stating that I had an unsupported modem and to call in. Well, no poo poo.

Their phone queues are awful, so I just did a private post on DSLReports on their support forum. It turns out the best way to do this plan upgrade is to:

1. Order the modem online through this really crappy web form
2. PICK UP the loving modem from a Canada Post outlet because TekSavvy only ships with the "Card on Pickup" option for some reason, so the mailman won't even attempt a delivery.
3. Once you receive the modem, put in a request to change the modem you have on file to the new MAC address of your new modem. This takes 3-5 business days apparently.
4. Once the modem has been registered, plug it in so you can use the internet on your existing plan
5. Finally request for the plan upgrade, this also takes 3-5 business days.

I'm only at step 2 right now. Sigh.

Some of this is imposed on them because Rogers won't process more than one change type per 'ticket', and doesn't give any feedback on change completion. Trying to submit a modem MAC change and speed change on the same ticket is automatically closed.

The pickup thing is dumb, though, they never even tried signature required or anything, so I doubt they had some rash of thefts to deal with.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



infernal machines posted:



*not available outside major metropolitan markets

Mister Macys posted:

* not available outside condos made in the last three years.

My building (near Yonge and Finch) was built in the mid-60's and Bell is currently wiring it up for fibre to the suite, all at their own expense. The pulls into the phone room are done, and we are working towards doing the runs up to each unit. Hopefully, in less than 6 months or so it'll all be lit up and ready to go. Bell has a big, big push on right now to get fibre deployed, because there is no other way for them to match what Rogers can offer. If you are in a condo anywhere in Toronto, tell your condo board they should be talking to Bell to see what is possible.

EoRaptor fucked around with this message at 19:31 on Jan 27, 2017

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Lobok posted:

Docsis.


That all makes sense but the notice we got from the property management mentioned only cable and cable outlets. Admittedly our building notices are always written by someone who doesn't have the best command of English but I would think here they're just using whatever terms and phrases were supplied by Bell.

Bell doesn't do co-ax cabling at all, so I'd guess somebody is confused. It might be that Bell is putting in fibre, and the easiest way into the suite is via the conduits that are currently used to run co-ax cable for tv/rogers. That wouldn't change the cable outlets or anything, just add a new one next to it.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Sheeple posted:

Did anyone jump on the Fido 60/10 unlimited for 60$? Made the switch from teksavvy since our package didn't change much and I didn't want to pay for a new modem.

Consistently getting 80-90 down so far. Hopefully it stays that way with no price shenanigans. There's no contract which works both ways I suppose, I can cancel whenever but they could also mess with the price.

My issue with the Fido deal/price is that it clearly shows Rogers was sandbagging the CRTC on basic costs, to try to lock out competitive pricing and pad their own margins. It took years of loving around and millions of dollars to just get through all the lies, and there is no consequence for them. They simply cut their prices and use the Fido brand as a 'fake' discount provider.

I'm choosing to stick with Teksavvy, even though it's a bit more expensive, simply because I can't fund such a company (TPIA costs not withstanding). Of course, I'm also about to make myself a massive hypocrite, because Bell is currently wiring my building for fibre to the suite, and the moment that goes live I'm jumping over. :/ Hopefully, TPIA fibre access doesn't drag on for years.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



infernal machines posted:

what's the current state of open access to fibre infrastructure here? last i saw there were no open access requirements, so whoever wired your building had an effective monopoly on service.

The CRTC has said that open access for major providers (Bell, Telus, etc, but not Beanfield, Metrolinx, etc) is mandatory, but they haven't held any hearings about how that type of access will work or what the costs will be. I'm expecting 2 years to be the minimum before it happens.

Bell in Ontario, at least, should be straightforward, as they use PPPoE for their fibre offering, making the routing and hookup exactly the same as a DSL TPIA.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Stanley Pain posted:

Pretty sure you can get Gigabit anywhere in Rogers' footprint right now. Pulling 80MB/s on a download as if you're copying things from one HDD to another sure is a thing :D

There also isn't a rate set for TPIA access to the gigabit tier. This has been another game from Rogers, as soon as rates are set for whatever is on offer, Rogers retires those speeds and introduces new ones at new prices, then takes the absolute maximum amount of time allowed to submit new rates for approval. It can take 2 years for TPIA's to get access to a speed, and then Rogers just does the whole thing again.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



Chris Knight posted:

Hmm supposedly Bell has FTTH in my downtown Toronto area. I just assumed it would never come lol.

Bell has a huge, huge fibre deployment push on right now. They've been doing all the buildings starting from downtown and heading out along major roads (bloor, yonge, etc) and clumps of highrises. I'm up in north york and they are doing my building right now.

If you are in a neighbourhood where power/telephone is on poles, they've probably already strung fibre up there, and they will be hooking everybody up as soon as they have enough trucks available to service install requests.

Out of luck people are those with buried power/phone, as that's big $$$ to connect each household, and/or if you are in an area where internet penetration is low (dsl or cable). They won't offer product if they don't think anybody will buy it.

My guess is that the cost of maintaining existing copper is now higher than the cost of running and deploying fibre, and even with the upcoming TPIA requirements for fibre, they don't see the point of waiting anymore. They will still sandbag the CRTC as much as possible to keep it to themselves, but even that is a clock ticking down.

EoRaptor fucked around with this message at 03:37 on Feb 24, 2017

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



cowofwar posted:

FTTH is the biggest loving scam, it never includes fiber for the last mile.

What? With Bell they use the 'Fibe' branding to mean either fibre to the home or pair bonded vdsl, which is a little bad, but they are clear in the actual offers what you are getting. If they say FTTH they do mean it.

With mine, I get a fibre pair right to my apt, as they wired up my entire building running fibre to each unit.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



8ender posted:

For a while there I honestly thought DSL was going to stay competitive with cable using G.fast, and Bell even seemed to be ramping up to it by installing remote DSLAMs all over, but it never really materialized in Canada, or really anywhere. Meanwhile DOCSIS has harnessed some sort of ungodly dark power to do gigabit over a cable invented in the 1950's.

The DOCSIS spec that allows for such speeds depends on a few things:

1. That the actual cable loop be quiet small before it hits a hybrid fibre+coax junction.
2. That analog broadcast channels be removed from active service and re-purposed for DOCSIS use on that segment.
3. That the cable install meet minimum standards, and usually that means RG6 for the entire loop.

Broadcast TV needed much, much more bandwidth than a voice conversation ever did, so from the start cable was going to have more built in. Even so, getting gigabit out of cable requires a lot of hurdles to be cleared first, and unless the provider seriously invests in making very small cable loops, it will run into contention problems very quickly. Tens of people in a loop using gigabit services will swamp each other and all others on the loop unless that loop is no more than tens of people in total size. While Bell GPON residential fibre has similar issues, with 2.5Gigabit shared between max 31 people, it's also much easier to subdivide or re-assign people than it is on cable. Rogers is testing all fibre deployments, where the ONT spits out coax into a persons basement (loop size of 1, really), so they know the time for traditional cable is also coming to an end.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



shadow puppet of a posted:

I saw a note that work has begun on wring Bell Fibe up along the exterior of my apartment building.

I went to check:





Is this a joke? Is it not installed yet? Or is that the real Fiber To The Dreary 60's Highrise (FTTD6H) service offering?

edit: Ah wait, "to the neighborhood" so it must not be installed yet. Hopefully.

If they have only begun to run external wiring, and you haven't had your suite visited by Bell, they haven't finished yet. Each suite will need a Bell tech to come in, pull the fibre cable in from outside, and terminate it somewhere.

Even that won't make it active, Bell will then do a whole bunch of performance and profiling of those lines before they will add them to their billing system and make them active.

As a new subscriber, you will qualify for some good pricing, too: Read the last few pages. Some buildings get even better deals, but don't settle for anything less than the $99 for gigabit, tv+extra pvr, and home phone.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



shadow puppet of a posted:

Ah thank you. My apartment's unit number is not in the bell system, so I used a neighbor's thinking they had the gone through the technician final install.

I''m the sort of weirdo that has no use for tv, pvr or home phone service. So sadly I doubt there is any chance of haggling them down to ~$50/mo for just the gigabit without bundling in those heaps of extra services.

But on the other hand, the standalone gigabit fibe that is right now listed as $149 is never coming down in price until the day when Bell is sold to a Chinese agribusiness holding fund to combat Rogers getting sold to a murky US infrastructure hedgefund and a proper price war breaks out in the lead up to a shooting war.

You can read the entire RFD thread, but Bell won't budge on pricing without that bundle. The bill breakdown shows 75 for gigabit, 24.98 for bell tv, and .01 for the bell phone, but bell will not offer anything like that unbundled.

I'd take that pricing, and just not use the tv/phone part. Bell guarantees the discount for 2 years (not the price, if the base price rises, you will see an increase) and by then the CRTC should have decided the access rates, method, etc, for TPIA fibre access, so you could then choose a third party for hopefully not too much.

You should also get a letter when your apt goes live, and bell will plunk a guy with a booth in your lobby to sign people up. I doubt the lobby person will have the best pricing, but you should be able to call bell directly and ask for the new subscriber discount.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



zergstain posted:

To all those that have 100 Mbps+ internet, did anybody get their homes wired up for ethernet after it was built? Can you tell me about the costs and the procedure? I'm not sure if this is the right thread to be asking this.

Currently I only have wifi, which seems to max out at just under 100 Mbps, so it seems pointless to go above my current 60/10 internet service.

I've wired my own house, but I just cheated and ran cabling through the air ducts and cold air return. As long as it's plenum rated cable and you break out a decent distance from the furnace and seal any holes you made, it's pretty handy and cheap.

If you want in wall wiring, you'll be restricted to either making a mess of the drywall, or only running it where you have access above the wall (eg: attic) or below the wall (basement), and doing that type of thing involves careful measurement and some good power tools.

EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



zergstain posted:

Do you mean like the cable would just come out of the floor/wall vent and go to your ethernet port? Anyway, I'm not sure that would work given the layout of this place.

Yes, basically. The cable modem sat near the tv, and its Ethernet cable went into a nearby floor vent. Once in the basement, it went into a switch that then feed multiple runs into the cold air return to the second floor. From there I followed the baseboard into each room, wedging the cable between the carpet edge and the baseboard, or just running it behind furniture.

You may have noticed I said switch. I should also note that the cable modem wasn't a router/nat. This was early enough that the cable company didn't limit the number of devices that could get a dhcp lease. I did eventually replace the switch with a router, because no firewall for a computer was also bad.

I've done proper wiring in offices ( drop ceiling ) and it's pretty easy in that case, but now I just contract all that out. Faster and more reliable.

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EoRaptor
Sep 13, 2003



shadow puppet of a posted:

Fibe just smashed the exterior window to my highrise apartment and are now screaming at each other from 20 stories up. I guess halting work in 42kph winds wasn't part of the rollout plan.

Whereabouts are you located? We are currently waiting for the exterior install on our building to be scheduled, after they completely failed at the interior install attempt.

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