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  • Locked thread
The Automator
Jan 16, 2009


LavistaSays posted:

I could go onto another tirade about how James Yeager/TRG is just as big of a scumbag as John Willis, but thats really for another discussion. He basically deletes and permabans anybody who comes onto his site with a negative complaint/bad customer service issue, while totally pampering a local to him/highly vocal on his forum group of fanboys. They spout off so much about all the crap he does for them, and he and his mods brush the bad press under the rug.

It's a shame because his company does a lot for the shooting industry as a whole and are highly reccomended from a training standpoint, but my personal interactions with Tactical Response, as a business entity have been entirely shady, I would never put a dollar into his pocket. Even after I PM'd multiple moderators/other guys on the site via back channels they basically each told me "Hey sorry everything you're telling us is probably true but James/John sign our checks so i'm not about to bite the hand that feeds me"

Yeager is a shithead also. He's backed out of a couple dealings I've had with him at the last minute and I'm not a huge fan.

I've ordered a LOT of stuff from TRG and had nothing but really, really good service. While I hate to throw money Yeager's way, they're a pretty good shop in my experience.

GetOffTheX.com is a FANTASTIC forum to read when it comes to training, tactics, and gear. However, it's definitely an 'old boy's club' and if you don't have the credentials they like (basically if you've never trained with Tactical Response) and you have a differing opinion, you usually get run off the board.

The Automator fucked around with this message at 23:14 on Nov 2, 2010

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wilfoy
Jan 21, 2004


The Rat posted:

Serpa holsters are crap. The button release can get clogged with debris and fail to release the pistol, and can also lead to NDs into one's leg. Unfortunately, they're also the most well-marketed holster right now.

I will buy platinum for the first person that provides a link to an actual first-hand account of a ND that can be blamed on a SERPA holster. Ditto for the person that provides more than one first-hand account of a SERPA becoming locked up.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Hold on. Despite being a rigger for quite a few years now I had never heard of a "riggers belt". I just looked them up and think I am misunderstanding something.

People dont really plan on repelling from a loving belt do they?


Also, a chalk bag will comfortably hold 20 12g shotshells and is very easy to load from. They can also be had with pretty flowers on them. There are a lot of similarities between tacticlol shooters and stagehands who insist on hanging 25lbs of poo poo on their belt when all they will be doing is coiling cable all night.

My closet full of belts, pouches, vests and assorted crap is my hidden shame. I do think I could repurpose a lot of it if I ever manage to get into three gun.

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


wilfoy posted:

I will buy platinum for the first person that provides a link to an actual first-hand account of a ND that can be blamed on a SERPA holster. Ditto for the person that provides more than one first-hand account of a SERPA becoming locked up.

God drat it. The forum that had several first hand accounts of jammed serpas went offline. It is what made me decide to not use mine.

OldschoolDOS
Feb 10, 2006

For your tomorrow, We gave up our today.

I've used a SERPA for IDPA and Steel Challenge for about a year now. I haven't had much call to roll around in the mud for either of these, but I was wearing one when I was jettisoned from my ATV while driving like an rear end. In addition to breaking two ribs and bruising my kidney my Sig 226 in my SERPA had mud and poo poo all over it. The button was a gritty and squishy press but it did function. Though it did function I could see how some of the scree and mud I landed in could have worked their way under the button and prevented it from being depressed.


As far as ND's go, if you shoot yourself in the leg you must be doing it wrong. You don't put your finger on the trigger until you are ready to shoot, and I haven't ended up with my finger on the trigger post-draw. It always ends up on the frame where it is supposed to.

The Automator
Jan 16, 2009


wilfoy posted:

I will buy platinum for the first person that provides a link to an actual first-hand account of a ND that can be blamed on a SERPA holster. Ditto for the person that provides more than one first-hand account of a SERPA becoming locked up.

The ND issue is operator error. It's due to bad form that's GREATLY exacerbated by the locking mechanism of the holster. It's not the holster's fault, but the holster greatly increases the risk of a non-squared away person unintentionally firing a round.

Also

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k_VA_Z7RsA

The Automator fucked around with this message at 23:31 on Nov 2, 2010

The Automator
Jan 16, 2009


bunnielab posted:

Hold on. Despite being a rigger for quite a few years now I had never heard of a "riggers belt". I just looked them up and think I am misunderstanding something.

People dont really plan on repelling from a loving belt do they?

It's one of those marketing things where the company can charge more money by putting on a D-ring and claiming how tough their belt is.

Flanker
Sep 10, 2002

OPERATORS GONNA OPERATE
After a good night's sleep


The Rat posted:


I'm not a gear queer, I'm metro-tactical.

You're vet and a pmc. If someone calls you a gear queer they should be kicked in the teeth.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

The Automator posted:

It's one of those marketing things where the company can charge more money by putting on a D-ring and claiming how tough their belt is.

Holy poo poo. That is such a bad idea. Like, I would ride an ATV through a boulder-filled field while bare-backing a Haitian hooker with a cue-ball taped to the base of my spine before I would loving try and rappel with all my loving weight on a loving belt.

Also why don't people just make a sit harness that doubles as one of those war belt things? They can be pretty comfortable if set right.

Action Jesus
Jun 18, 2002



My name is Action-Jesus, and I'm a geer queer. I have absolutely never BTDT as far as getting paid to use a weapon and defend other's safety, I'm simply a loving nerd who got into gear after playing airsoft as a child then growing out of that and getting into actually going through courses and other training events. Beyond that I've never had to use this stuff "for real" and I'm going to try to keep most of my opinions to myself and simply post what I've gathered and come across in my research and little experience. A few of these photos are mine but many of them simply belong to GIS.

Now, let's talk about some of the more broad and basic systems and styles of gear!

The Automator posted:

First line belts



First line/battle/war belts are becoming an increasingly popular option to hold your equipment. The main benefit they have over chest rigs is that they're much lower profile and hold enough gear for a class or competition. They're often a little quicker to load from, though this can be mitigated with practice. They also get your kit off your chest so there's less potential for snags.

Popular belts include:
Blue Force Gear Modular Padded Belt
ICE Adjustable Battle Belt
VTAC Brokos Belt

To expand upon this, first and foremost, a First line belt or your first line in general refers to basic kit kept on your person that is needed the most, encompassing survival, sidearm, a small amount of magazines should you need them, any blades/tools, some hydro, sometimes a dump pouch, etc. The tactical operating operator uses this level of gear to have the essentials on his (tactical) person should for whatever (tactical) reason he has to jettison his heavier kit.

War belts as TheAutomator mentioned above are the more recent evolution of this line utilizing molle pouch attachments with other load carrying advancements like built in suspender loops as well as more engineered padding. These are not the exclusive in this case however, the first line can include simply the contents of your (tactical) pants, your pants belt, and/or a basic "duty" belt style of setup. As with all tactical operator operations, its setup is up to the end user and therefore has as many possible configurations and uses as the "mission" requires.

Second Line Gear

As TheAutomator posted above, a chest rig is one example of this. But, that is one facet of this line as it is what comprises your main rig.
It can be a Vest


Load Carrying Equipment


A Chest Rig


A Plate Carrier


Even integrated body armor systems (we'll touch on body armor in a moment)


As well as combination/'hybrid' systems


Chest Rigs, Plate Carriers, and MOLLE attachment are all the rage these days for a variety of reasons. With the evolution and proliferation of armor in the last decade or so, plates that can stop almost any small arms round are very popular and have saved a lot of lives, and has seen the comeuppance of the Plate Carrier style of rig- a lighter rig with molle attachments designed to simply hold front and/or back armor plates (and typically utilized in conjunction with a soft armor vest)


The chest rigs have also seen a large growth in popularity because of their ability to be worn over issued armor vests, their ease of use and comfort when going in and out of vehicles, as well as their modularity and their ability to provide the user with more 'rapid access' to whatever is needed. This creates the drawback however, depending on the need, that for prolonged use, the chest rig does not distribute a load as evenly or as comfortably as some other load carrying equipment, HOWEVER, for relative short term wear, the chest rig is comfortable as well as very handy and quick to maneuver.


Vests have long lost popularity and it's hard to argue they've ever seen it widespread. While they used to be quite common, their excessive coverage (which translates to being hotter and less mobile) doesn't balance with their often unmodular/unchangeable pouch configurations which offers nothing to the user as far as arranging their setup to their own preference. That's not to say that this is a universally worthless system and that nobody has ever liked it- they've long been popular with LE personnel as a quick to don all-in-one rig that can be kept in a trunk for special situations (the kind of things you hear labelled as First Responder/Active shooter scenarios) as well as the SWAT/Tactical Team usage which as far as I know, the vest setups are still pretty widespread.

Some of the more adapted vests I suppose should be touched on in this part, are also modular and quite handy I have to say. The FLC (Fighting Load Carrier) which was part of the earliest incarnations of the MOLLE system, has a couple different generations with mildly different features but all in all actually do a good job of not having excessive nylon covering your body, as well as light weight and since they are issued by Uncle Sugar, aren't as expensive as BHI, Eagle, or the like.


Most hybrid rigs are strikingly similar to a standard chest rig often with more advanced features to facilitate needs like carrying armor plates, carrying pouches/plates on the back of the rig (Radios, water bladder pouches, other utility pouches for various specific needs) There are many of these in a wide variety of styles that have streamlined as they've progressed. Early "all in one" rigs like the HSGI WASATCH quickly fell out of favor once the user realized exactly how much poo poo this rig is designed to hold and carry, and that it really doesn't make much sense unless you are wearing bomb squad body armor under it and/or weigh a good 300 lbs. I speak on that one after being a dumbhead and ordering one, and even though I found a lot of its features to be quite usable and handy, it simply never fit quite right. Other variations of these hybrid rigs such as the ones by SOTech, OSOE, Eagle, and others, have had hit-and-miss reviews, the main point seems to boil down to "do you really need that"


Integrated Body armor type rigs really have come into their own in the last decade especially after troops started hitting the ground in the current two wars and the interceptor body armor vests became prolific. From there the theory was expanded upon and we saw things such as the FSBE armor carrier, the Paraclete RAV, and the Eagle CIRAS, to name a few of the more popular ones. The FSBE, RAV, and CIRAS all had the key feature of a quick release/quick ditch system to allow the entire rig to be rapidly removed from the body for whatever reason, be it medical treatment, the need to do nothing more than run a whole gently caress of a lot faster, being able to stay afloat in maritime operations, or whatever the person wearing it wants to do. This typically consists of a relatively complicated system of releases tied into a central pull tab that once pulled, causes the vest to fall apart like braised pork shoulder. These are usually expensive systems even before you count the armor package (which doubles or triples the price, depending) and while it seems that they are quite popular for a lot of reasons, there are groups of thought which debate that having your gear attached to your armor isn't necessarily the best thing- for one example, if you wanted to get rid of your 15-20lbs of rifle bullets, grenades, extra water, and other miscellany without getting rid of armor, you couldn't necessarily do that.

As an aside I know I mentioned the interceptor vest (IBA) at the beginning of that last paragraph but it should be made clear that it is not necessarily an integrated armor rig, it was designed to have a dedicated 2nd line rig worn over it and simply has molle loops as an added convenience and an option to be able to put whatever pouches on the armor vest should the end user choose to.




Load Carrying Equipment is the probably the "lowest speed" form of a main rig/second line rig/what have you. In general when it is referred to, we are talking about a Pistol belt with all of your ammo, hydration, and utility pouches hung off of it, with padded suspenders which serve to help carry the belt as well as allow other small functions like holding lights or compasses. This is the "rig of our fathers" and even though it's had its use up until the current conflicts, it more or less has it's beginnings to pre WW1, and has seen numerous iterations since. Even with the super HSLD operating operators, these have still held popularity as a way of distributing a load much better for long patrols/hikes/entire weekends of airsofting, and also just about 100% of the time work flawlessly with just about any sort of armor vest and heavy pack. The pouches are inherently WAY less "high speed" than you see with a lot of the other go-fast gear mentioned above, pouches are typically fitted with full coverage flaps with active retention, for when it's more important to make sure you don't lose your poo poo over several hundred miles of countryside rather than making sure you can do a 3 second mag change in your sweet M4. Another benefit of this sort of system is that out of all listed so far, it promotes the ability to do things like low crawl and go prone exceedingly more.

UP NEXT: THIRD LINE GEAR AND OTHER FUN STUFF.I have to eat dinner now

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.



wilfoy posted:

I will buy platinum for the first person that provides a link to an actual first-hand account of a ND that can be blamed on a SERPA holster. Ditto for the person that provides more than one first-hand account of a SERPA becoming locked up.

I don't have any first-hand personal experience, however Kyle Defoor from Tigerswan told the class that I attended that he had witnessed it a few times. Before Tigerswan he was Blackwater's lead instructor for around five years, so he's had quite a bit of experience instructing and seeing all the various kinds of errors that can happen.

Regarding 'war belts', I agree with the above description. Mine is way overkill, but it keeps what's necessary on my person at all times. All I have to do is throw on my plate carrier if need be. It still weighs twenty pounds fully loaded, mainly owing to the radios and soft armor inserts I have in it. Thankfully the soft armor makes it sit quite comfortably on my hips.

Also regarding the above: gently caress wearing an IBA. From what I've seen, the new IOTV isn't any better.

In terms of gear/gun forums, I prefer lightfighter.net to GOTX. I don't post a whole lot, but I can get a ton of solid information and end user reviews by using their search function. I've learned more about guns and gear from there than anywhere else. Just be sure to follow their forum rules though; they're a bit uptight.

Airbone Operation
Dec 22, 2007
Tosser

If a plain bare bones IBA is a soft skin humvee then the IOTV is an MRAP. It provides increased protection for more weight and less maneuverability.

wilfoy
Jan 21, 2004


I'll concede that it's possible for a SERPA to jam up, but it's not nearly as common as the message board echo chamber would have you think. I've never once seen a first-hand account of a ND involving one, though. Depressing the button and drawing the pistol leaves your trigger finger indexed against the frame, rather than over the trigger.

Scratch Monkey
Oct 25, 2010

Proč bychom se netěšili když nám Pán Bůh zdraví dá?


What about "war belts" with carriers? It would seem like overkill to me, but the guy for whom I purchased that ruck uses both together. He's on a Long Range Surveillance team which while not technically SF is darn near it, so I have to imagine he's had a chance to put his stuff to the test.

Also, he uses a Condor plate carrier which he has pronounced as "alright". Go figure.

Iron Squid
Nov 23, 2005

by Ozmaugh


How do these tactical backpacks compare with the offerings at REI? Obviously the later aren't meant to drag MOLLE add-ons around and stuff, but for carrying 50+ lbs through the Pacific Coast Trail, they're pretty good.

Scratch Monkey
Oct 25, 2010

Proč bychom se netěšili když nám Pán Bůh zdraví dá?


For regular "non tactical" hiking don't bother with expensive military style gear. It's really not necessary and often times not particularly well suited for the job. Unless your hikes include a lot of throwing yourself prone and living in a hole in the ground that is.

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


Iron Squid posted:

How do these tactical backpacks compare with the offerings at REI? Obviously the later aren't meant to drag MOLLE add-ons around and stuff, but for carrying 50+ lbs through the Pacific Coast Trail, they're pretty good.

For straight hiking stick with a good bag from REI or the like. Molle etc. offers you nothing for hiking.

Atticus_1354 fucked around with this message at 01:30 on Nov 3, 2010

Airbone Operation
Dec 22, 2007
Tosser

I know some people who love old alice packs for recreational hiking/backwoods camping. I can't imagine one would be all that expensive.

Iron Squid
Nov 23, 2005

by Ozmaugh


Scratch Monkey posted:

For regular "non tactical" hiking don't bother with expensive military style gear. It's really not necessary and often times not particularly well suited for the job. Unless your hikes include a lot of throwing yourself prone and living in a hole in the ground that is.

Cool. One of my friends does this and spends half his hiking time trying to remember which MOLLE pouch he put his headlamp in.

Only to remember he left it in the car.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

...so what about non-Serpa Blackhawk stuff? I may have gotten a couple things on clearance when Palehorse Defense went out of business.

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


Airbone Operation posted:

I know some people who love old alice packs for recreational hiking/backwoods camping. I can't imagine one would be all that expensive.

You don't want an ALICE for hiking. They really are not that great for any distance. I know from experience. Get an REI brand or Kelty bag if you are on a budget.

Airbone Operation
Dec 22, 2007
Tosser

Atticus_1354 posted:

You don't want an ALICE for hiking. They really are not that great for any distance. I know from experience. Get an REI brand or Kelty bag if you are on a budget.

I never had any issues with them for rucking. I had a frame break on me on like mile 4 of a 12 mile and that was pretty painful with it stabbing me in the back but in good order it was never too bad.

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.



Scratch Monkey posted:

What about "war belts" with carriers? It would seem like overkill to me, but the guy for whom I purchased that ruck uses both together. He's on a Long Range Surveillance team which while not technically SF is darn near it, so I have to imagine he's had a chance to put his stuff to the test.

Also, he uses a Condor plate carrier which he has pronounced as "alright". Go figure.

It's not overkill considering that belts don't provide any kind of ballistic protection over your torso.

My gripe with the Serpa goes beyond the jamming/ND hearsay. The one I currently have on my belt was a huge pain in the rear end. When I unscrewed it from the paddle attachment it was on in favor of the MOLLE attachment, I ended up screwing it in juuuust too hard (I'm talking fractions of a pound here) and it stripped out the threads on the female end of the holster. I ended up having to take a knife and gouge out a bunch of the plastic on the MOLLE piece to get the screw to go in far enough to get bite on the female threads. It did this with two out of three screws, so it wasn't just a fluke.

Also, I hate having to think about pushing the button to release the pistol. Yeah yeah, training issue, I know. But my G-code has a retention device that I don't have to think about. That is, the paddle that gets pushed out of the way when I grip the pistol naturally. It's faster for me, and there's no chance of missing the release button.

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


Airbone Operation posted:

I never had any issues with them for rucking. I had a frame break on me on like mile 4 of a 12 mile and that was pretty painful with it stabbing me in the back but in good order it was never too bad.

You can make do with them and if it is all you know they are ok. The problem is they don't really have much adjustment. There are much better options for people on a budget.

Airbone Operation
Dec 22, 2007
Tosser

Atticus_1354 posted:

You can make do with them and if it is all you know they are ok. The problem is they don't really have much adjustment. There are much better options for people on a budget.

Yeah now that I think about it my friends are suckers for punishment.

Naramyth
Jan 22, 2009

Australia cares about cunts. Including this one.

The Rat posted:



I'm not a gear queer, I'm metro-tactical.

The Rat with a carbine gas on a 16" barrel using a MOE handguard? You should be able to bring your own upper. Your lack of rice is disturbing.

And holy poo poo gear talking, you guys own.

SinistralRifleman
Oct 9, 2007

by Cyrano4747


wilfoy posted:

I will buy platinum for the first person that provides a link to an actual first-hand account of a ND that can be blamed on a SERPA holster. Ditto for the person that provides more than one first-hand account of a SERPA becoming locked up.

I have seen Serpa holsters lock up 3 times at competitions from debris in the mechanism. Sorry we didn't take the time to document them; but even if we did I assume people would call us heretics.

This really seems to be one of those things, people won't believe it until they see it. There are other holster designs that offer similar retention and speed with less problems. In other news, the emperor has no clothes.

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


SinistralRifleman posted:

There are other holster designs that offer similar retention and speed with less problems. In other news, the emperor has no clothes.

That's the thing I don't get. Why would you want to buy a holster that has a chance of locking up when there are equal designs or better holsters out there for around the same price.

shovelbum
Oct 21, 2010



Fun Shoe

Iron Squid posted:

How do these tactical backpacks compare with the offerings at REI? Obviously the later aren't meant to drag MOLLE add-ons around and stuff, but for carrying 50+ lbs through the Pacific Coast Trail, they're pretty good.

I'm an archaeology tech and about half of the survey crew on this project uses cheapish REI house-brand day packs. 3-10 miles a day (slog slog slog, curse this slow project) through mud thorns and barbed wire for months and months and no issues with any of it. We beat the poo poo out of everything and hiking style packs hold up pretty well even with way too much equipment strapped on it in ways that really shouldn't hold up.

Flanker
Sep 10, 2002

OPERATORS GONNA OPERATE
After a good night's sleep


Atticus_1354 posted:

That's the thing I don't get. Why would you want to buy a holster that has a chance of locking up when there are equal designs or better holsters out there for around the same price.

Marketing. Serpas are cheap AND everywhere. loving everywhere. Gun shops, hunting outfitters, Military PX (of all nationalities), police suppliers...

I see them on a lot of soldiers marines and LEOs and it depresses the hell out of me.
A lot of branches/agencies are issuing them.

I will pimp my Safariland harem when I get around to writing a mega post for this thread.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



You're all doing it wrong, too many snaggy edges to be truly low drag. Let me show you how this poo poo is done:

Take Roy Baker's spiffy new pancake, and add a thumb-break for super retention without hang-ups like those cheap-rear end Jay Pee suicide specials. Slip in a round-butt model 10 with combat grips (T-Grips are for peasant wanna-bes). No sights to snag, and grip positions you. Then you slip on a dump pouch, no more fumbling for loose shells in your pocket or fussing over cartridge loops:



Then you load up with some RNL standard pressures. Quicker follow-ups than +P for your high speed needs. LSWC-HP can deform and lose accuracy, no good:



Whatcha! All my ammo right in my palm, ready to load, with no change or marbles to sort through:



And you will notice it is all in ninja black. Your lesson in HSLD is now complete.

Drav
Jul 23, 2002

We've come a long way since that day, and we will never look back at the faded silhouette.

The Automator posted:

This is me in all my gear, just so you know I really do know what I'm talking about :


Wow it really is you under there!


Airbone Operation posted:

http://www.specopsbrand.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductID=12



I swear to god this is the best pack I have ever owned. I bought it back in 2005 and it has survived just about every imaginable situation and condition. Just down right rugged as hell.
I would have to concur. I've owned one for that same amount of time and it just will not give in. I have 90 pounds in it and I fling it around everyday yet it's still here with like one loose thread. I'm going to buy another one just in case that company is no longer in business 15 years from now when I finally need a replacement.

sky shark
Jun 9, 2004

CHILD RAPE IS FINE WHEN I LIKE THE RAPIST

The Automator posted:

It's one of those marketing things where the company can charge more money by putting on a D-ring and claiming how tough their belt is.

No. Rigger's belts have a long history; I don't remember exactly how they came into being, but originally they were made from parachute harness webbing made by (dur) the parachute riggers. They didn't really start to come into vogue in the military until the early 90's; before then you typically only saw them on guys who did a lot of jumping, or rappel instructors which is why they were also known as instructor's belts - it's a really handy thing to have on when you are at the top of a rappel tower or working out the side of a helicopter on a regular basis but don't want to put on a full harness. Prior to everyone and their brother making them, you'd typically have to head down to the rigger shed and have one made, showing that you worked with those guys on a regular basis.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Butch Cassidy posted:

You're all doing it wrong, too many snaggy edges to be truly low drag. Let me show you how this poo poo is done:

I was surprised to learn that the LAPD still issued the 158-grain lead round nose as standard duty ammo until 1984.

LavistaSays
Dec 25, 2005



Supreme mac daddy tactical pack:



Mystery Ranch makes the illest packs basically. I lived out of my 3-day assault pack for over a month while hiking from Harpers Ferry VA to NYC, sometimes hauling 35lb+ Loads for 20 miles or more in a day. (pic from a more recent weekend trip in the smokeys)

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


God drat I want a mystery ranch pack. I just can't justify the price right now. I do plan to blow tons of money on a new pack and gear when I graduate school in a few years. If you have money there are some amazing high end packs out there.

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.



Naramyth posted:

The Rat with a carbine gas on a 16" barrel using a MOE handguard? You should be able to bring your own upper. Your lack of rice is disturbing.

And holy poo poo gear talking, you guys own.

I could have an upper sent here, but then I wouldn't be able to get it back. The MOE handguards, light mount, and ACOG I can at least get back home.

You'll be truly shocked that that's a DPMS with a 1/9 non chrome-lined barrel.

Hasn't pooped out on me yet, but I haven't put many rounds through it at all.

DrakeriderCa
Feb 3, 2005

But I'm a real cowboy!

I like gear sometimes. I might hit up a megapost sometime soon, if I have the time, but for now I'll just share my thoughts so far:

Holsters:
- Safariland makes the best holster with retention, in my opinion. I've used 6004's for a few years now and they're fast, secure and if something mechanical jams, I can cut the strap and I still have a rad holster. Currently using a 6280 (belt-mounted holster with SLS) for my 3-gun belt rig
- Also happy with my HSGI drop-leg rig. Clean, simple and excellent for riding around in a truck all day. It was lower-profile and didn't snag at all while mounting/dismounting.

Chest Rigs/Vests:
- I was really happy with my OSOE MODFROG rig. I used it for my Front Sight course and it worked well. Lots of real estate, solid as gently caress and has a nice organizer panel inside the vest.

War Belt:
- I'm running one for 3-gun now. If I was a ground-pounder when I was overseas, I might have tried one then. As it stood, I wasn't high-speed enough, so I just used the issued vest. Which sucked.
- Make sure that if you run a belt-only system, your mags are set up so that you can comfortably reload. The way mine were set up, they ran halfway across my rear end.

Slings:
- I prefer single-point for vehicle-mounted ops and two-point for range use or dismount (I don't have much experience with dismount ops). The rapid-adjust two-points that are popular now are pretty nice. I use one for 3-gun. It's nice.
- Buy quality. I've had cheap single point slings disintegrate on me and literally fall off my body. Bad feeling. OSOE's single point is solid as gently caress and uses one continuous piece of webbing for the body. Even if the bungee fails, it keeps working (thanks for the recommendation, madradhu).

Lights:
- Have a bunch. Petzl makes the best headlamps I've used (and I've used a lot). I also do some Ice Climbing, and Petzl headlamps have taken me down a few icefalls and alpine hike-outs in my life. They're tough, have good battery life and offer a lot of different layouts. I love them. I also like Fenix flashlights, although I haven't used one in a "tactical" manner yet. I had one on my duty belt for searches for awhile, and it was great. Never had a quality issue with one.

Watch:
- I've had a G-Shock Mudman since basic and it's served me well. I've done everything to this watch except for get hit with an IED, and it's worked great. Ice climbing, snowboarding, surfing, and skydiving. No problems ever. It's ugly and looks stupid but I don't care - it works.

That's all I can think of for now.

Gray Stormy
Dec 19, 2006



I have some compulsion that forces me to manufacture my own gear. Ive made myself a number of holsters and recently a mini chest rig. Right now Im on the fence on whether to buy molle mag/shotshell/dump pouches or just make my own.

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bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

sky shark posted:

No. Rigger's belts have a long history; I don't remember exactly how they came into being, but originally they were made from parachute harness webbing made by (dur) the parachute riggers. They didn't really start to come into vogue in the military until the early 90's; before then you typically only saw them on guys who did a lot of jumping, or rappel instructors which is why they were also known as instructor's belts - it's a really handy thing to have on when you are at the top of a rappel tower or working out the side of a helicopter on a regular basis but don't want to put on a full harness. Prior to everyone and their brother making them, you'd typically have to head down to the rigger shed and have one made, showing that you worked with those guys on a regular basis.

I refuse to believe it. How could the belt not rip right out of the loops and break some ribs and/or crush some organs?

I guess it might be better then falling from a tower but come the gently caress on it takes 10 seconds to get into a sit harness and maybe 30-45 to get into a proper fall arrest harness.

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