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Snackmar
Feb 23, 2005

I'M PROGRAMMED TO LOVE THIS CHOCOLATY CAKE... MY CIRCUITS LIGHT UP FOR THAT FUDGY ICING.


3D printing! It's rad!
Okay the op was way out of date. If you're new or stuck, please feel free to post your questions. Here are a few helpful tips:

EVIL Gibson posted:

Found this image and it's flipping amazing. I love the attention to what the problem is and, more importantly, looks like.



Here's some advice you can count on: Don't buy a loving MakerBot.

I'll expand on this with some more tips soon! Otherwise, there's lots of friendly folks here who have experience with DIY, consumer, and industrial 3D printers.

Snackmar fucked around with this message at 06:41 on Aug 27, 2017

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Three-Phase
Aug 5, 2006

by zen death robot


snackmar posted:

The next great IP war

The staggering implications of almost-free home manufacturing should make any IP lawyer poo poo their pants and/or see dollar signs. This isn't going to happen overnight, but how many people churning out copies of stuff will it take for a large corporation to take notice? Even something simple like scanning remote control battery covers that people could print as replacements has the potential to blow up into a legal problem.

(A Target Store, 2070)

Welcome to Target! What I can get for you?
I want the Keurig X5 coffee maker, please.
Ok, what colors for the case?
Pantone 18-1762 TPX for the body and 19-4007 TCX for the trim.
Nice color choice! I love hibiscus. Are there any modifications listed you'd like?
Higher capacity reservoir. Oh, and the Wireless-V1 compatibility system and heuristical morning coffee timer. What the heck, I'll take the acoustic damping as well, that's only an extra $3.
Ok! That's $89.99, it'll be printed for you in about ten minutes. MoneyPac or Credit?

I'm hoping this technology will lead to something like this in the future, because it will be cool as hell.

Three-Phase fucked around with this message at 01:26 on Nov 14, 2010

Wong Dongson
Mar 26, 2010

More like Wrong Dongson am I right?

Get it?

Because I'm really fucking dumb and annoying and usually have no idea what the fuck I'm talk about.


Well, they are getting cheaper and faster and with a stronger material base for home users as time goes on. Still, best case you are looking at hours to knock out one item. Anything that might require multiple objects to be assembled is the work of days. And while the cheaper models listed are pretty good, they can lead to a rougher finish. If you want something a bit more polished it's in the higher four figure range.

Realistically though, in about....a decade? You are going to see some crazy poo poo going down with the technology. If you have the money to drop now you can pull off pretty cool things. Thingiverse and the like make it easier for non-artistic types to pull off practical applications of the technology, but if you have an artistic flair you can do some crazy things.

Want to commemorate your victory in a fantasy football league the right way? Whip yourself up a trophy top depicting your sodomy of number two in the league. *That* will be a memory they don't soon forget! Want to make children think you are God? Whip out a toy their tiny retarded kitten brains made up on the spot. Once you show them you have that power, they will be broken to your will forever.

Considering the applications, it's a remarkably front loaded technology. The big loving print costs a lot, sure, but filling it isn't *that* bad unless you use it constantly. And if you are using it constantly, you are getting your money's worth aren't you?

Verizian
Dec 18, 2004
The spiky one.

Another link to check is http://fabathome.org

Last time I looked into home pre-fabricators most models still used 2 part epoxy resins that had to be hand mixed before use and had a very limited lifespan. Apparently since then they've come up with a way for the machine to mix it as well as using hot plastic and vinyl extruders.

It's funny to think but in the next few years you would probably be able to download a song in a lossless studio quality format then print it out as a tiny vinyl record for your grandparents birthday. Meanwhile in the next few decades you could print out a micro SD card or USB stick with that very same song already on it.

Industrial electronics production already uses the same principles that 3D printers are designed around and constantly used to solder complex components onto Circuit boards. It's only a matter of time before the home models are precise enough and then all you need to do is buy individual components. Followed a shortwhile later by printing your own once the plans for a printable rapid prototyper enclosed in an air tight vacuum with static shielding become available.

As for the shop scale, imagine walking into your local mechanics and ordering an entire new body for your car, carbon fibre with a sweeping bonnet and folding gullwing doors. Or perhaps a hard to find component to fix a 60yr old classic car.

Snackmar
Feb 23, 2005

I'M PROGRAMMED TO LOVE THIS CHOCOLATY CAKE... MY CIRCUITS LIGHT UP FOR THAT FUDGY ICING.


Wong Dongson posted:

Want to commemorate your victory in a fantasy football league the right way? Whip yourself up a trophy top depicting your sodomy of number two in the league.

Heh, during an NHL 11 tournament with friends I printed out a mini Stanley Cup for the winner:


Click here for the full 600x800 image.


Verizian posted:

Another link to check is http://fabathome.org

I'm surprised that I hadn't heard of that one before. It looks like they had food-based printing before the MakerBot.

Edit:
The model I used for the Stanley Cup came from Google 3D Warehouse, if anyone wants to print one: http://sketchup.google.com/3dwareho...5f8&prevstart=0

One thing though, the overhang on the cup portion is really severe.. I held a piece of paper under the nozzle as it was extruding so that the plastic had a surface to settle on. You could add supports or something if you wanted to build a really nice large-size version.

Snackmar fucked around with this message at 13:14 on Nov 14, 2010

Verizian
Dec 18, 2004
The spiky one.

I think they started by cannibalizing an easy-bake oven for parts then squirting cake batter from syringes into silicone cupcake moulds. Topped with frosting from another syringe after 20 mins under a 40watt bulb.

kafkasgoldfish
Jan 25, 2006

God is the sweat running down his back...

I really dig http://www.shapeways.com. The prices are quite reasonable, the community is helpful and they have a ton of different materials. Printing in stainless steel is just too cool.

They have a pretty good interface for uploading models and getting cost estimates.

Three-Phase
Aug 5, 2006

by zen death robot


kafkasgoldfish posted:

I really dig http://www.shapeways.com. The prices are quite reasonable, the community is helpful and they have a ton of different materials. Printing in stainless steel is just too cool.

They have a pretty good interface for uploading models and getting cost estimates.

Edit: Nevermind, saw some of the costs listed for standard customized stuff.

Three-Phase fucked around with this message at 01:29 on Nov 15, 2010

kafkasgoldfish
Jan 25, 2006

God is the sweat running down his back...

Three-Phase posted:

How much for a simple plastic or metal part? I'm just curious what the ballpark is.

There's is a $25.00 per order minimum but something around the size of a matchbox is roughly $7-10 depending on the actual volume of material.

edit: That's for the 'white strong and flexible plastic' which is some sort of sintered nylon. I just found a random octopus ring in the gallery that someone is selling for $33.00 in gold plated stainless steel. http://www.shapeways.com./model/147...g_1.html?gid=mg

Bobulus
Jan 28, 2007



I'm curious how thin you can make stuff without making it prone to breaking?

Could you make something like, say, a hinged CD or DVD case? I imagine the little center-ring-seat thing would be trouble.

kafkasgoldfish
Jan 25, 2006

God is the sweat running down his back...

Bobulus posted:

I'm curious how thin you can make stuff without making it prone to breaking?

Could you make something like, say, a hinged CD or DVD case? I imagine the little center-ring-seat thing would be trouble.

The center-ring-seat thing would work fine. In fact the sintered nylon is quite tough and flexible. So yes, a CD or DVD case is definitely possible.

They say the minimum wall for the nylon is .7mm but I know people have gotten away with less so long as it is anchored to a thicker section. In other words, I've seen models with thin spikes or ridges which were made possible by having thicker bottoms.

Having said that, my experience with this is pretty shallow

Twerpling
Oct 12, 2005
The Funambulist

Bobulus posted:

I'm curious how thin you can make stuff without making it prone to breaking?

Could you make something like, say, a hinged CD or DVD case? I imagine the little center-ring-seat thing would be trouble.

I have made a crap load of 3D parts on several different printers, commercial and hobby ones. Additionally I have built 4 of these machines. They are really easy to put together as they are essentially a crappy cnc + heater head.

Only the highest quality printer could print those out and have them functional. You could make a lid or case or something, but not the joint and the CD tab.

The maker bot makes stuff that is really rough. Pretty much nothing that comes out of there can really be used without some sort of modification unless it is some real simple machine like the bottle openers or coat hangers, or what have you. I would imagine right now it would be best for 'art' stuff.

Also, here is a ring I made on my 3D printer:
FIX YOUR lovely HTACCESS FILE BEFORE EVER POSTING AN IMAGE HERE EVER AGAIN

Apparently the first thing people make on these goddamn things are green lantern power rings. This is a custom 'kitchen corps' ring. The resolution/smoothness on this is probably like 2 or 3 times what standard hobby machines give out.

(USER WAS PUT ON PROBATION FOR THIS POST)

ValhallaSmith
Aug 16, 2005


Whats the max resolution on modern 3d printers now? Previous examples I've seen had fairly rough surface finishes.

Twerpling
Oct 12, 2005
The Funambulist

ValhallaSmith posted:

Whats the max resolution on modern 3d printers now? Previous examples I've seen had fairly rough surface finishes.

Absurdly good. Objet printers use a process where a very thin photopolymer (light activated polymer of a sort) layers are laid down and then a UV light cures the appropriate areas. The objects that come out are incredibly smooth; usually I can't see any stepping or blocky-ness without a magnifier. The only issue is that the objects are not fully cured when they come out and will droop over time if they are under strain.

Here is an equivalent hobby machine that uses the same process:

http://3dhomemade.blogspot.com/

Twerpling fucked around with this message at 07:13 on Nov 15, 2010

ValhallaSmith
Aug 16, 2005


Twerpling posted:

Absurdly good. Objet printers use a process where a very thin photopolymer (light activated polymer of a sort) layers are laid down and then a UV light cures the appropriate areas. The objects that come out are incredibly smooth; usually I can't see any stepping or blocky-ness without a magnifier. The only issue is that the objects are not fully cured when they come out and will droop over time if they are under strain.

Here is an equivalent hobby machine that uses the same process:

http://3dhomemade.blogspot.com/

Oh hey, he used a DLP projector for exposure. I was thinking of doing something similar for exposing pcbs.

It seems to be kind of a trade off. This technique gives great resolution. But you are limited to dyed resin. What I really want is something that will let me print fully painted war miniatures. But those sorts of systems were kind of lacking in detail.

Verizian
Dec 18, 2004
The spiky one.

Pretty sure Games Workshop switched their plastics production to a rapid prototyping system around 7 years ago and that cost them around £300k. They still couldn't wouldn't get them ready painted.

If however you wanted to build a cheap home system for it nowadays you could probably rig up an airbrush with undercoat/basecoat and some kind of protection to keep paint away from the glue joins. Some kind of warm wax/vinyl dabber or something.

ValhallaSmith
Aug 16, 2005


Verizian posted:

Pretty sure Games Workshop switched their plastics production to a rapid prototyping system around 7 years ago and that cost them around £300k. They still couldn't wouldn't get them ready painted.

If however you wanted to build a cheap home system for it nowadays you could probably rig up an airbrush with undercoat/basecoat and some kind of protection to keep paint away from the glue joins. Some kind of warm wax/vinyl dabber or something.

Thats kind of what I was figuring. But the lack of resolution would mean having to have some sort of CNC painting system. Which I guess could be done but I can't think of any examples short of cars.

Now that I think about it though, the epoxy system might work. You could just blow fine powder into the .1 mm layer and then expose it. Then when the part comes out wash it in a solvent to expose the embedded powders.

Ugh, CNC airbrush is sounding easier.

Verizian
Dec 18, 2004
The spiky one.

Just aim for an automatic undercoat/basecoat and maybe an ink bath with a few strong 120mm fans for blowdrying.
You could probably do some really good ork skin tones using an automated dipper. Dunk for 10 seconds then blowdry for 5 mins, repeat for an hour and blend-paint it with valejo's while the ink is still tacky to go for an organic flesh depth/translucent effect.

Must stop thinking about stuff like this, I quit wargames because of the price and these 3D printers make it nearly affordable.


On a related subject, can someone explain to me exactly how a DIY 3d scanner works if the only electronics are a pico projector and a webcam? What exactly does it project to sense depth in an object?

Snackmar
Feb 23, 2005

I'M PROGRAMMED TO LOVE THIS CHOCOLATY CAKE... MY CIRCUITS LIGHT UP FOR THAT FUDGY ICING.


Speaking of scanning, a guy named Oliver Kreylos is doing some neat stuff with the Kinect.

Right now he's got it such that he can do 3D movement of a scene in real-time: http://idav.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/R...t/MainPage.html (jump to 40 seconds into the first video if you're pressed for time)

Makes me wonder if it could be used as a really easy 3D scanner, like just sitting an object on a turntable and spinning it to bust out a workable 3D model.

Snackmar fucked around with this message at 14:07 on Nov 15, 2010

Sockser
Jun 28, 2007

Eternal greatness only exists only within my posts.

Sing a song of sorrow in a world where your shitpost has vanished!






snackmar posted:

Speaking of scanning, a guy named Oliver Kreylos is doing some neat stuff with the Kinect.

Right now he's got it such that he can do 3D movement of a scene in real-time: http://idav.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/R...t/MainPage.html (jump to 40 seconds into the first video if you're pressed for time)

Makes me wonder if it could be used as a really easy 3D scanner, like just sitting an object on a turntable and spinning it to bust out a workable 3D model.


I've watched this gif like, 30 times and it's still making my head swim

GWBBQ
Jan 2, 2005



Three-Phase posted:

(A Target Store, 2070)

Welcome to Target! What I can get for you?
I want the Keurig X5 coffee maker, please.
Ok, what colors for the case?
Pantone 18-1762 TPX for the body and 19-4007 TCX for the trim.
Nice color choice! I love hibiscus. Are there any modifications listed you'd like?
Higher capacity reservoir. Oh, and the Wireless-V1 compatibility system and heuristical morning coffee timer. What the heck, I'll take the acoustic damping as well, that's only an extra $3.
Ok! That's $89.99, it'll be printed for you in about ten minutes. MoneyPac or Credit?

I'm hoping this technology will lead to something like this in the future, because it will be cool as hell.
It's going to be great for little stuff around the house. Break a clip that holds the shelf on your refrigerator door? $3 for a one-time-print file or $5 for 3. Snap the battery door off your camera? print a new one and swap in the hinge and contact from the old one for a a few bucks. Need a cell phone belt clip (not that you should be wearing your cell phone on your belt in the first place)? no need to go down to the store, just decide whether you want to spend $5 on an OEM model or take a chance with the free one and hope it doesn't print an 8" dildo instead. Actually want an 8" dildo? print it instead of worrying about how discreet the packaging really is. The possibilities are limitless.

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



The worst part about that, though, is the fact that companies will purposely make things even less durable in the hope that they can make more money on microtransactions for little fiddly clips and brackets that loving break all the time.


If it's more like in the book Diamond Age, where the generic stuff is free as long as you can wait for it to get made, and the more expensive stuff you pay for (or the really expensive stuff is handmade) then I'll be totally ok with having these little wonder machines all over the place.

One of the coolest applications I see for these things is printing out something to be cast in metal, but I guess I'm biased.

Wong Dongson
Mar 26, 2010

More like Wrong Dongson am I right?

Get it?

Because I'm really fucking dumb and annoying and usually have no idea what the fuck I'm talk about.


Slung Blade posted:

The worst part about that, though, is the fact that companies will purposely make things even less durable in the hope that they can make more money on microtransactions for little fiddly clips and brackets that loving break all the time.


If it's more like in the book Diamond Age, where the generic stuff is free as long as you can wait for it to get made, and the more expensive stuff you pay for (or the really expensive stuff is handmade) then I'll be totally ok with having these little wonder machines all over the place.

One of the coolest applications I see for these things is printing out something to be cast in metal, but I guess I'm biased.

It's very much a genie/bottle type situation. Once quality 3D scanners and printers get cheap enough [If you want something baby smooth now, you are probably at least in the 5 figure range for a printer. Quality 3D scanners also ridiculously expensive] that home users can realistically pick them up, you are in a sense done. They are functionally no different than any other type of printer. You tell it what to do, it does it. Anyone that wants to put up the plans to print <blank> is within their rights to do so, and all you need to do is snag the file and print.

With cheap enough 3D scanners, you can snag the information for all sorts of things and knock off a duplicate pretty easy. You don't need the greatest artistic skills, you don't need to own the thing being scanned. Just point, click, zoom around the thing to gather it's data and done. Some minor editing to get rid of anything that doesn't belong and there you are. Do it enough and you can get all the parts for a complex piece of machinery, and then congrats. You've just copied and duplicated the manufacturer of what could be a very expensive piece of machinery.

And there is absolutely nothing anyone can do to stop you. Much like stealing movies and games off the internet, once the technology is out there you can't take it back. You can't even regulate it all that much. All you can do is deal with the new reality it presents.

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!

Slung Blade posted:

One of the coolest applications I see for these things is printing out something to be cast in metal, but I guess I'm biased.

This is exactly what I was thinking. You could set a project up to be made in wax(some sort of wax) and then just set it and forget it. When its done, all you have to do is sprue it, make the mold, then stick it in a kiln ala lost wax.

Then its off to casting.

ASSTASTIC fucked around with this message at 04:18 on Nov 16, 2010

kafkasgoldfish
Jan 25, 2006

God is the sweat running down his back...

ASSTASTIC posted:

This is exactly what I was thinking. You could set a project up to be made in wax(some sort of wax) and then just set it and forget it. When its done, all you have to do is sprue it, make the mold, then stick it in a kiln ala lost wax.

Then its off to casting.

Why not just print it in metal in the first place?

edit3: Just so we're clear, these are just some cool examples I've found, I had nothing to do with them.
edit: Incidentally, there are some really sweet 3d wax printers out there that print in the thousands of DPI. Let me find a link...



edit2: wax printing at it's finest

kafkasgoldfish fucked around with this message at 03:59 on Nov 17, 2010

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Hell yea subscribing. I have just recently been getting into microcontrollers but on the list after that are a propane furnace and something that cant print plastics for lost wax casting. I saw reprap a while back and will definitely be following this thread.

Snackmar
Feb 23, 2005

I'M PROGRAMMED TO LOVE THIS CHOCOLATY CAKE... MY CIRCUITS LIGHT UP FOR THAT FUDGY ICING.


Saw this on Boing Boing the other day:

quote:

CloudFab has joined our global digital making network, giving Ponoko customers the ability to create 3D printed designs. All with no set up fees, no minimum orders, and a free 365-day replacement policy.

We’ve added five new 3D printable materials to our materials catalog including durable white plastic, superfine plastic, rainbow color ceramic, stainless steel and gold plated stainless steel.

Ponoko Personal Factory 4 will auto price, auto check, and auto fix your 3D designs. We’ve also got 5 new starter kits for 3D modeling softwares: Alibre, Autodesk 3ds Max, Blender, Google SketchUp, and Solidworks.

The ! Exclamation Lamp is a glimpse of what’s possible: laser-cutting for flat surfaces, 3D printing for rounded and complex shapes, and electronics hardware to “bring everything to life.” It’s available as a free download in the Ponoko marketplace so you can customize your own.



Basically it's a service that lets you design/build/sell/buy stuff that is a combination of 3D printing, laser cut materials, and electronics. (With a side-helping of crowdsourcing.)

dxt
Mar 27, 2004
METAL DISCHARGE

these things look pretty awesome. I interned at a company that makes 3D printers acouple years ago but they were for industry and cost thousands of dollars, I had no idea the hobbiest market had come this far.

theparag0n
May 4, 2007

INITIATE STANDING FLIRTATION PROTOCOL beep boop

Grimey Drawer

Hellz yes, a 3d printing thread.

I've started collecting parts together in the last few weeks for a RepRap Huxley (mini mendel), if i've not missed anymore parts from my BoM the final cost should be coming to about £350.

I'm writing up the build process here, one of my aims is to improve the documentation and build instructions around the huxley, as it is currently woefully under-documented.

sdobz
May 6, 2007
Moron.

Some friends and I are looking to build a Mendel. Does anyone have an updated price estimate, if we're building from scratch? We're trying to invest less than $100 per person (yay college budgets) and want to get a large enough group together before we start.

Is there anything we should worry about during construction?

General Apathy
Apr 5, 2009


theparag0n posted:

Hellz yes, a 3d printing thread.

I've started collecting parts together in the last few weeks for a RepRap Huxley (mini mendel), if i've not missed anymore parts from my BoM the final cost should be coming to about £350.

I'm writing up the build process here, one of my aims is to improve the documentation and build instructions around the huxley, as it is currently woefully under-documented.

Awesome, I will be eagerly following your progress. I've been wanting to make a RepRap since back when the Darwin was new, just haven't been able to find the necessary funds yet.

Snackmar
Feb 23, 2005

I'M PROGRAMMED TO LOVE THIS CHOCOLATY CAKE... MY CIRCUITS LIGHT UP FOR THAT FUDGY ICING.


MakerBot Industries recently opened the first retail store that sells 3D printers:


Click here for the full 1024x240 image.


http://blog.makerbot.com/2010/11/26...re-opens-today/

SublimeDelusions
Jun 19, 2005
Dentyne Fire + Dentyne Ice = End of World?

I have a few questions about this as this might actually be something I could use for research.

What scale are these models made at? Can you resize something larger? And what is the largest size of an object you can make in these? In addition, exactly how do you go about making the 3D models for the program to work with? Out of the basic MakerBot, what exactly is the product quality like? Do you get a fine scale of detail or not?

Basically, I suck with technology, but this looks really useful for me to use as a hobby and for work I'm doing academically.

SublimeDelusions fucked around with this message at 13:51 on Dec 1, 2010

Snackmar
Feb 23, 2005

I'M PROGRAMMED TO LOVE THIS CHOCOLATY CAKE... MY CIRCUITS LIGHT UP FOR THAT FUDGY ICING.


SublimeDelusions posted:

What scale are these models made at? Can you resize something larger? And what is the largest size of an object you can make in these? In addition, exactly how do you go about making the 3D models for the program to work with? Out of the basic MakerBot, what exactly is the product quality like? Do you get a fine scale of detail or not?

On the MakerBot side, the last step before printing is for software called ReplicatorG to take the STL file and translate it into a series of instructions for your hardware. Recently it got an integrated scaling feature so that you can easily change a model's size right before printing.

The basic MakerBot CupCake CNC is rated to print objects at 101mm x 101mm x 152mm (4" x 4" x 6"). You can make bigger objects - the record is an object 210mm tall - but you have to know what you're doing. My tallest print is just under 120mm though, it can start to get a bit hairy around there with the Z-stage seizing up.

The default plastruder nozzle on the MakerBot is 0.50mm. There are aftermarket upgrades you can get to increase the resolution such as the MakerGear line of plastruder replacements. To get an idea of quality click on some of the photos in the OP or browse Thingiverse for more examples.

Edit:
Oh, and to create 3D models you can work with just about any modeling tool. Almost every package will have an option for exporting to STL format which you can then feed to RepG. Blender and Google Sketchup are very popular because they're free. (Sketchup needs a plugin like this one to export to STL.)

Snackmar fucked around with this message at 17:28 on Dec 1, 2010

SublimeDelusions
Jun 19, 2005
Dentyne Fire + Dentyne Ice = End of World?

snackmar posted:

Lots of useful stuff.

Thanks! I appreciate the help. The reason I'm asking is because I'm looking at possibly doing some CT work for my research, which would result in 3D images of some of the scans. And I know the one guy that I'm trying to get to sign onto my committee mentioned before that his lab was looking into a rapid prototype machine. Since I'm not with his lab, I'm not sure I'd have access to it, and I thought that making some of these scans might be pretty useful.

4"x4"x6" is a little small for some of the scans, however, I think it might actually be right around the perfect size for a couple. It's good to know that scaling works though as it may actually help remove some of those issues.

Plus, for some of the hobbies that I do, it would be nice to be able to just replicate any pieces I need as opposed to trying to cut them out of other pieces (which gets horribly tedious and messy).

Looks like in addition to getting a new laptop that can handle 3D work, I might also have to look into picking up one of those makerbots.

SublimeDelusions fucked around with this message at 03:00 on Dec 2, 2010

Snackmar
Feb 23, 2005

I'M PROGRAMMED TO LOVE THIS CHOCOLATY CAKE... MY CIRCUITS LIGHT UP FOR THAT FUDGY ICING.


SublimeDelusions posted:

Thanks! I appreciate the help. The reason I'm asking is because I'm looking at possibly doing some CT work for my research, which would result in 3D images of some of the scans. And I know the one guy that I'm trying to get to sign onto my committee mentioned before that his lab was looking into a rapid prototype machine. Since I'm not with his lab, I'm not sure I'd have access to it, and I thought that making some of these scans might be pretty useful.

As I mentioned in PM:

Before you go and buy/build one, I want to be clear that enthusiast 3D printers are not quite "set it and forget it" yet and that there is still a fair amount of trial and error and weird finicky-ness. I don't want to discourage you, but you have to be prepared for poo poo to not work right.

Since you're doing some academic work, your budget might be better spent uploading 3D models to Shapeways for them to print out. There's a lead-time of 2-3 weeks, but they can print in much finer resolution and in metal, sandstone, and glass. Here's a full list of materials/pricing: http://www.shapeways.com/materials/material-options

On the other hand, if you're just going to print one or two things and mainly use it for hobby stuff then you're probably just fine shelling out for a MakerBot.

BizarroAzrael
Apr 6, 2006

"That must weigh heavily on your soul. Let me purge it for you."

This is fascinating, great thread. Caught my attention because of my hobbies of Games Workshop and Japanese plastic kits (Gundam/Gunpla) I've seen some stuff recently of very impressive projects made with custom 3D-printed parts.

Would one of these kits be suitable for that sort of thing? Would probably take a bit of effort to plan things out to make things with the pegs and tabs to fit existing components.

£500 is a bit steep for me but I shall keep an eye on things to see if cheaper options come up.

Wolfsbane
Jul 29, 2009

What time is it, Eccles?



I was interested in the thread for the same reason, but after looking at pictures of the output on a couple of sites I don't think the €500 machines are really up to it. You'd have to do a fair bit of work before the models were usable, and even then the fine detail isn't really there.

Currently trying to convince my boss to spend €12000 on one of the professional ones

Snackmar
Feb 23, 2005

I'M PROGRAMMED TO LOVE THIS CHOCOLATY CAKE... MY CIRCUITS LIGHT UP FOR THAT FUDGY ICING.


Made some glow-in-the-dark Space Invader earrings on the MakerBot yesterday:



The posts I "designed" myself and the invader comes from http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3647 that I modified to be thinner and a little smaller.

Edit:
Oh, and I used glow-in-the-dark plastic from http://store.makerbot.com/glow-abs-plastic-1lb.html

Snackmar fucked around with this message at 11:30 on Dec 12, 2010

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JohnnySmitch
Oct 20, 2004

Don't touch me there - Noone has that right.

The company I work for as a product designer has 2 different 3d printers that I'm lucky enough to be one of only 4 people that get to use it - we've got a Z-Corp powder based (color!) 3d printer, and we just recently got an Objet that prints in plastic (rigid or flexible). I'm totally spoiled as a designer to get to design something in 3d and then print out several iterations of it in a matter of a few hours. Here's my latest print from the Z-Corp printer:


Click here for the full 720x720 image.

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