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fatman1683
Jan 8, 2004
.

WebDog posted:

There are a few ways to do this. It sort of depends on what inputs your camera has, most usually seem to have two XLR jacks or at worst, a 3.5mil (headphone) jack. You can buy XLR to 3.5mil adapters.
It also depends a bit on if you have a sound recordist on site as well as they can run things through the mixer.

But if you're on the ground in a single person crew then a zoom is a handy bit of kit to have if you don't have any sound recordists. The H4 or H6 have a nice array of XLR inputs so you can split lapel mics (if you are using them) or booms into separate channels then use the zoom's main mic and/or the camera's to record a general safety.

Often a boom/lapel/lapel combo is fed out of the mixer into a mixdown that goes into one channel on a camera, the other channel is the on-camera mic. So this gives a reasonable amount to work with, but you are going to suffer from issues where if both people talk you won't be able to pick apart the sound in post. Best practice has every audio input on it's own channel, even if it's a L/R stereo split, so you have some latitude when cutting dialogue.

Thanks. My intention was to hook the stereo into the camera directly (A7R2), then pipe that audio over HDMI to the external monitor/recorder (Atomos). I'd then use the extra 3.5mm jack on the Atomos itself to add the shotgun mic on a third channel. Would this work or would it create issues with phasing and whatnot?

edit for clarity: This is a very low-key setup, it'll be just my wife by herself or with me for backup, but I'm just barely competent with a camera and definitely not a technician. We will probably not have booms or lavs, since we'll be working in the field, and while it's not quite guerilla, it's definitely not a 'we're the media and we're going to walk around with our crew and rigs' sort of scenario.

Hence, stereo+shotgun both on camera. I was hoping this would keep the size of the rig down and the moving parts to a minimum while still giving us good channel separation for the relevant audio sources.

fatman1683 fucked around with this message at Oct 16, 2018 around 08:22

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powderific
May 13, 2004



Grimey Drawer

Wait so where are you putting the shotgun? If it's not on a boom you aren't going to be getting that great of interview sound. Are you thinkin you put all three mics on the camera? Cause that's a little wacky. I'd just do the shotgun on camera if that's what you're looking at. I don't know many people who actually use stereo mics for the type of recording it sounds like you'll be doing. And then for interviews it's really important to get the mic off camera and closer to your subject.

Koalas Massacre
May 21, 2007



Has anyone done any of the 48 Hour Film challenges? A friend and I just signed up and have been recruiting people pretty successfully but I'd appreciate some advice.

Our current outlook is that a smaller core group (director/writer, story/video editor, cinematographer, make & female leads) is best and we have a range of people on deck (sfx/make up/costuming/ different musicians/extras) in case we need them with their schedules cleared and ready.

Unfortunately our cinematographer just dropped out (got a great opportunity, can't blame them) and we're having trouble finding someone else. Me and another friend can take over but I don't want us to burn out from wearing too many hats. On the other hand maybe us doing multiple things is better for keeping the project coherent and consistent?

Our main goal is to just have fun and network, so I'm not really concerned with winning. (There's barely a prize anyway) and while winning isn't the main goal, I still want the finished product to be entertaining and good.

Koalas Massacre fucked around with this message at Oct 16, 2018 around 13:59

Lizard Combatant
Sep 29, 2010



Koalas Massacre posted:

Has anyone done any of the 48 Hour Film challenges? A friend and I just signed up and have been recruiting people pretty successfully but I'd appreciate some advice.

Our current outlook is that a smaller core group (director/writer, story/video editor, cinematographer, make & female leads) is best and we have a range of people on deck (sfx/make up/costuming/ different musicians/extras) in case we need them with their schedules cleared and ready.

Unfortunately our cinematographer just dropped out (got a great opportunity, can't blame them) and we're having trouble finding someone else. Me and another friend can take over but I don't want us to burn out from wearing too many hats. On the other hand maybe us doing multiple things is better for keeping the project coherent and consistent?

Our main goal is to just have fun and network, so I'm not really concerned with winning. (There's barely a prize anyway) and while winning isn't the main goal, I still want the finished product to be entertaining and good.

Do you plan to have sound? Someone with a boom and a set of headphones will make a huge difference. Never had the time to do a 48hr challenge but I've seen plenty where bad sound stuck out the most to me.

Koalas Massacre
May 21, 2007



Lizard Combatant posted:

Do you plan to have sound? Someone with a boom and a set of headphones will make a huge difference and bad sound really sticks out.

Yes! Our sound guy is awesome and I have worked with him previously.

Lizard Combatant
Sep 29, 2010



Koalas Massacre posted:

Yes! Our sound guy is awesome and I have worked with him previously.

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


Jade Ear Joe

Koalas Massacre posted:

Has anyone done any of the 48 Hour Film challenges? A friend and I just signed up and have been recruiting people pretty successfully but I'd appreciate some advice.

Our current outlook is that a smaller core group (director/writer, story/video editor, cinematographer, make & female leads) is best and we have a range of people on deck (sfx/make up/costuming/ different musicians/extras) in case we need them with their schedules cleared and ready.

Unfortunately our cinematographer just dropped out (got a great opportunity, can't blame them) and we're having trouble finding someone else. Me and another friend can take over but I don't want us to burn out from wearing too many hats. On the other hand maybe us doing multiple things is better for keeping the project coherent and consistent?

Our main goal is to just have fun and network, so I'm not really concerned with winning. (There's barely a prize anyway) and while winning isn't the main goal, I still want the finished product to be entertaining and good.

We've done several of these. They are fun but exhausting.

Some general notes - pay attention to the "P"'s: Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance.

Don't wear too many hats, have as many people as possible for even the smallest of tasks. Will help things run smoothly and more importantly, concurrently where possible. Reduce the amount of task dependency. Wearing too many hats will definitely cause a bottleneck.

Smaller groups as you mentioned are good. Make sure everyone has the ENTIRE 48 hours blocked off for un-thought of contingencies.

Not sure how you plan to ingest and edit everything, but try to put your editor on the opposite sleep schedule as you. You're finished shooting just as they're waking up and getting ready to edit and you can go catch a nap.

Don't let the rushed schedule get in the way of good practices! It's easy to just let the camera run when you're feeling rushed and you want to get it. But things like that can really gum up the works later.

And, obviously, do whatever you can before hand. Get all clearances and forms signed. Any prosthetic appliances, etc all done and ready. Things like that.

Most importantly. Do not have ANYONE on the team (especially critical roles) that isn't dependable. We had a great editor one time, but he was terrible with time dependencies and he couldn't leave well enough alone and we missed the deadline one year by a few hours.

Perfect is the enemy of good.

Sorry that's all kind of generic.

fatman1683
Jan 8, 2004
.

powderific posted:

Wait so where are you putting the shotgun? If it's not on a boom you aren't going to be getting that great of interview sound. Are you thinkin you put all three mics on the camera? Cause that's a little wacky. I'd just do the shotgun on camera if that's what you're looking at. I don't know many people who actually use stereo mics for the type of recording it sounds like you'll be doing. And then for interviews it's really important to get the mic off camera and closer to your subject.

Thanks, this makes sense. Is there a way to mount a boom to the same tripod she'll be using for the camera? This would make it easier for her to manage solo.

Lizard Combatant
Sep 29, 2010



BonoMan posted:

We've done several of these. They are fun but exhausting.

Some general notes - pay attention to the "P"'s: Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance.

Don't wear too many hats, have as many people as possible for even the smallest of tasks. Will help things run smoothly and more importantly, concurrently where possible. Reduce the amount of task dependency. Wearing too many hats will definitely cause a bottleneck.

Smaller groups as you mentioned are good. Make sure everyone has the ENTIRE 48 hours blocked off for un-thought of contingencies.

Not sure how you plan to ingest and edit everything, but try to put your editor on the opposite sleep schedule as you. You're finished shooting just as they're waking up and getting ready to edit and you can go catch a nap.

Don't let the rushed schedule get in the way of good practices! It's easy to just let the camera run when you're feeling rushed and you want to get it. But things like that can really gum up the works later.

And, obviously, do whatever you can before hand. Get all clearances and forms signed. Any prosthetic appliances, etc all done and ready. Things like that.

Most importantly. Do not have ANYONE on the team (especially critical roles) that isn't dependable. We had a great editor one time, but he was terrible with time dependencies and he couldn't leave well enough alone and we missed the deadline one year by a few hours.

Perfect is the enemy of good.

Sorry that's all kind of generic.

This is all good advice.
The only thing I'd add is, keep spare batteries charged and have enough cards so as to never have to reuse any.

powderific
May 13, 2004



Grimey Drawer

fatman1683 posted:

Thanks, this makes sense. Is there a way to mount a boom to the same tripod she'll be using for the camera? This would make it easier for her to manage solo.

Probably not in any way that's actually easier than just using a separate stand. If it's gonna be a solo thing putting a lav on the subject will probably be easier. Or having the camera static on the tripod and hand holding the boom (or even just putting a handle on the shotgun and holding it closer).

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


Jade Ear Joe

fatman1683 posted:

Thanks, this makes sense. Is there a way to mount a boom to the same tripod she'll be using for the camera? This would make it easier for her to manage solo.

You probably wouldn't want to be close enough for that to be possible anyway. We do tons of interviews/testimonials and generally are a bit further back and long lensed. Then lav and boom mics.

Lizard Combatant
Sep 29, 2010



Had a corporate edit job shot by "professionals" who thought that the camera mounted mic wouldn't pick up their incessant whispering because the subject was speaking loudly. loving clowns.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



I just put together this video for a boxing gym and would really like to get all of your feedback:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGQJ_HTHM0Y

Biggest challenge for this one was filming in a gym/crowd where not everyone signed a consent waiver. But we managed to pull it off by strategically positioning people. I tried to make it different from all of the other boxing videos that I've watched before, which all seem to follow the same boring formula. It's not my first gym and fitness video, but I took this one in a different direction and the client really likes how it came out.

Lizard Combatant posted:

Had a corporate edit job shot by "professionals" who thought that the camera mounted mic wouldn't pick up their incessant whispering because the subject was speaking loudly. loving clowns.
I immediately cringe whenever a "professional" tells me about their audio setup and all they have is a camera-mounted shotgun mic. It happens so often.

fatman1683
Jan 8, 2004
.

BonoMan posted:

You probably wouldn't want to be close enough for that to be possible anyway. We do tons of interviews/testimonials and generally are a bit further back and long lensed. Then lav and boom mics.

So a separate stand with a boom on it near the subject, shotgun mic there with its own Tascam? Then stereo on the camera for ambient sound?

powderific
May 13, 2004



Grimey Drawer

You want the mic for your subject to be as close as possible to them without being in the shot (or if it can be in the shot, just as close as possible really) and usually I just get room tone + whatever audio from b-roll rather than worrying about getting it synchronous with the interview. Not a journalist though.

Either way, I kinda feel like you should do some googling on "how to shoot an interview," read some super basic articles, and look at BTS shots of some interviews because worrying about phasing issues is definitely getting lost in irrelevant weeds.

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


Jade Ear Joe

fatman1683 posted:

So a separate stand with a boom on it near the subject, shotgun mic there with its own Tascam? Then stereo on the camera for ambient sound?

Here's our tried and true setup.

Boom mic on a c stand as close to top of frame as you can get it... a few inches out from their mouth (don't put it right over their head).

Lav/lapel mic for main sound.

Anything on camera is strictly for reference checking.

Room tone is something we get after the interview is over with the boom mic. Just have everyone shut up and record 30 seconds of sound.

fatman1683
Jan 8, 2004
.

powderific posted:

You want the mic for your subject to be as close as possible to them without being in the shot (or if it can be in the shot, just as close as possible really) and usually I just get room tone + whatever audio from b-roll rather than worrying about getting it synchronous with the interview. Not a journalist though.

Either way, I kinda feel like you should do some googling on "how to shoot an interview," read some super basic articles, and look at BTS shots of some interviews because worrying about phasing issues is definitely getting lost in irrelevant weeds.

Yeah, I've been reading a lot, just trying to see what I can manage with the one-man-band nature of this operation. I'm more focused on technical stuff (my wife is the shooter), so the weeds is where I live. If I can figure out a way that she can record all of the sound she'll need for a given segment in one go, it saves her time and effort.

BonoMan posted:

Here's our tried and true setup.

Boom mic on a c stand as close to top of frame as you can get it... a few inches out from their mouth (don't put it right over their head).

Lav/lapel mic for main sound.

Anything on camera is strictly for reference checking.

Room tone is something we get after the interview is over with the boom mic. Just have everyone shut up and record 30 seconds of sound.

Ok great, this makes perfect sense for indoor shooting. Would an outdoor interview/face segment use a similar setup?

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


Jade Ear Joe

fatman1683 posted:

Yeah, I've been reading a lot, just trying to see what I can manage with the one-man-band nature of this operation. I'm more focused on technical stuff (my wife is the shooter), so the weeds is where I live. If I can figure out a way that she can record all of the sound she'll need for a given segment in one go, it saves her time and effort.


Ok great, this makes perfect sense for indoor shooting. Would an outdoor interview/face segment use a similar setup?

Yup just with dead cats on the mics where you can if needed for wind.

And of course if it's a walk and talk you want a walking boom op.

Lizard Combatant
Sep 29, 2010



melon cat posted:

I just put together this video for a boxing gym and would really like to get all of your feedback:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGQJ_HTHM0Y


I like it, flows nicely. If I was going to pick on anything it'd be the opening shot veers a little before the wipe. I'd either lose it since it's not adding much or try to counter the jolt.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



Lizard Combatant posted:

I like it, flows nicely. If I was going to pick on anything it'd be the opening shot veers a little before the wipe. I'd either lose it since it's not adding much or try to counter the jolt.

Hey thanks! And yeah, I noticed that same issue. I tried to fix it with Resolve's stabilization function but it didn't really make a difference. I was filming on a gimbal between a pile of fallen dead trees. Thanks for taking a look at the video (and for your suggestion, of course).

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



Coming back to this thread with a Mocha Pro (Trial version) problem: I'm trying to do a screen replacement for that large black screen next to the flags on the wall. And I'm following the steps in this YT tutorial. But the tracking isn't working properly- the object to be placed keeps appearing off-screen, and obviously i can't just manually move it over in AE without loving up my Mocha-generated keyframes.



Any thoughts as to why this is happening? Because otherwise the track looks totally fine in Mocha Pro:



It just gets weird when I paste it over into AE. My original footage isn't trimmed or anything. And I'm pasting the keyframes at the first frame as explained in the tutorials. I also checked to ensure that my aspect ratios and FPS match in both AE and Mocha.

EDIT: Solved the problem. I was at Half Resolution in AE. I should have set it to full before launching Mocha. All good, now.

melon cat fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2018 around 18:02

powderific
May 13, 2004



Grimey Drawer

I don't have an answer for you but every time I use mocha I wind up having issues like that. I only use it like once every two years, have to relearn it every time, and always gently caress up that transfer from Mocha to AE.

Not helpful I know but you're sure not alone, ha.

Edit: ^^^ nice, usually I do something dumb with what kind of data I'm exporting at what frame ^^^

thunderspanks
Nov 5, 2003

crucify this

fatman1683 posted:

So a separate stand with a boom on it near the subject, shotgun mic there with its own Tascam? Then stereo on the camera for ambient sound?

Separate stand by the subject with a shotgun mic in a pistol grip out of frame overhead, pointed at the mouth. Not directly overhead, but overhead and in front of them a few inches so the capsule has a direct line of sight to the mouth. Run this shotgun into a sound recorder- pick your flavor of Zoom/Tascam device that has dedicated XLR inputs and can provide phantom power. If money is tight and you can only pick one audio solution, this will be the best sound you can get on a modest budget.

If cash permits, invest in a lavalier mic. These come in both wireless and hardwired versions.

There are pros and cons to each- wireless is more flexible and can easily accommodate a walk & talk but is susceptible to RF interference and battery life worries. Hardwires have the best sound quality and you'll never have to worry about it dying mid-interview but extremely limited mobility makes them useless for anything but a static setting.

Don't ever mix your primary sound source (IE shotgun/lav mic) with whatever garbage 'ambient sound' your onboard camera mic/camera mounted mic picks up, unless there is some very specific creative reason for doing so. It will never mix properly if you're not skilled in audio post. In addition to phasing (which it absolutely will do) its also going to be picking up all sorts of extraneous noise, like you whispering behind the camera or literally even touching the camera body. If you get both the shotgun AND a lav, run them both into the zoom/tascam and ultimately use the one that sounds best in the final product.

For context, I've been a professional location sound mixer (and post sound editor/mixer) for a decade and have recorded in every conceivable environment. I do actually know what I'm talking about. This rabbit hole goes as deep as you're willing to follow and everything I just wrote is really a high level overview, so feel free to PM me any questions

thunderspanks fucked around with this message at Oct 31, 2018 around 21:46

magiccarpet
Jan 3, 2005




How buggy is Premiere 19 and how is Mojave playing with it? Adobe boards have way too much static.

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


Jade Ear Joe

magiccarpet posted:

How buggy is Premiere 19 and how is Mojave playing with it? Adobe boards have way too much static.

Do you need to upgrade? If not just wait. It's always better to wait unless there is some sort of giant feature that you absolutely must have.

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the_lion
Jun 8, 2010

On the hunt for prey...

I usually wait 3 months for them to iron out the major bugs like the above post. Usually AE and premiere change stuff so your plugins need to be updated by the companies before they work. Save yourself the pain.

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