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Kolchak
May 3, 2006

If I don't tell this story now, I don't think I ever will.

I had to cut a little "happy snap" video for a client a month or so ago that was shot on a 5D. It was just footage of people arriving at a conference, shaking hands with the president, greeting old friends, hugging, kissing, etc. etc. But the weird thing was that whenever they noticed the camera was on them, people would smile and just freeze. Half of the footage I had was unusable because everyone thought they were posing for a still photographer. The shooter never bothered to correct any of them; he would just wait a few seconds before saying "okay thanks, got it" and so a good percentage of the shots were of people standing perfectly still with stupid grins on their faces. I've had an irrational disdain for the camera ever since...

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Kolchak
May 3, 2006

If I don't tell this story now, I don't think I ever will.

Ten posts up:

cubicle gangster posted:

Anyone here tried lightworks yet? They're making it free and open source.

http://www.lightworksbeta.com/

Kolchak
May 3, 2006

If I don't tell this story now, I don't think I ever will.

NeuroticErotica posted:

Hey guys - here's how to be a movie editor! Thank me later!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeaNfBfsAsE&NR=1
So all I need to do to become a movie editor is become a movie editor! Where the gently caress was this guy when I decided to fork over all that cash for film school?

"When you're finished, obviously you'll get set up with job interviews through your school."

Ha.

Ha. Ha.

Ha?

Kolchak
May 3, 2006

If I don't tell this story now, I don't think I ever will.

It depends on what you're looking to do, I think. I work mostly in television, so when I'm looking at editors' reels I'm looking for the ability to tell a story, to convey the geography of the scene, etc. My eyes usually glaze over when I'm sent another 3-minute collection of random footage and Video Copilot tutorials cut to "Paper Planes," because all it tells me is that you can sync your cuts to an audio waveform. I'd much prefer to see a few scenes from stuff you've cut.

That said, if you're looking to cut music videos or even commercials, then the montage might be the way to go, I dunno. Like I say I'm speaking from a TV perspective, which I imagine would cross over into film as well.

Kolchak
May 3, 2006

If I don't tell this story now, I don't think I ever will.

That pretty much always happens to me whenever I get an approval mix back from the audio house and I drop it into my timeline. Everything will still be in perfect sync, but the last frame or so is gone. This usually isn't an issue for me as the last couple frames of my show are silent (they're just the company logo), so I've never really bothered with it. Is your friend missing any audio there? If it's not crucial I wouldn't worry about it.

Kolchak
May 3, 2006

If I don't tell this story now, I don't think I ever will.

It takes me about 2 and a half weeks to put together a 47-minute rough cut for the network TV show I'm currently working on, and that's something that was shot professionally over the course of 7 days.

$150 is hopelessly low, even for a pitch and even for someone with little experience. The first pilot I ever cut was a fairly simple shoot, the final product was 22 minutes, and I think I got a couple thousand for the two or three weeks I spent on it.

My guess is, since you have very little experience, you'd probably spend about a month on an episode. And at $150, you'd be doing it for the sole purpose of GAINING experience, not the money.

It does raise about a hundred red flags though; typically you want a pitch to be as polished and slick as possible, and you don't ask a junior editor to work essentially for free to get them cut if you know what you're doing. Based on my past experiences, this situation sounds like it could get pretty painful. If you decide to go through with it, make you sure you get firm deadlines from him and make it absolutely clear that you won't be futzing around with the cut for months and month without end (without getting properly paid).

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Kolchak
May 3, 2006

If I don't tell this story now, I don't think I ever will.

(this is kinda long-winded, my apologies; hopefully this is what you're looking for)

It's different from show to show, but for this show and most of the ones I've worked on, I never have any storyboards or anything. I'm given a general outline of what happened on each day, and then I basically just watch through all the footage and look for the interesting moments in order to start building an ostensibly entertaining 45-minute show.

This one is a 3-camera competition show with three contestants working simultaneously, so there's a lot to go through. Some shows have story editors or assistant editors who will go through that step and put together an assembly but I hate that - I much prefer to know myself what's there and what isn't, especially when producers and network execs start asking for stuff down the line.

So I put together an hour-long rough cut based on what I think is the most interesting/entertaining but still conforms to whatever format restrictions we have, and then when I sit with the producer for the first screening he/she will tell me to look for more of this, less of that, etc. Then I'll pare it down even more, start placing temporary titles, temp music tracks and graphics to get a polished & presentable "rough" cut ready for the network, and then we send it up and wait for their notes.

I don't do much sound mixing except to make sure everything that needs to be heard can be heard; the heavy lifting in that department goes to the audio house. On this show we also have composers who will score it (the temp tracks I put in for the network's first rough cut are just there because network execs have no imagination and get nervous when there's no music telling you how to feel). On my last show, I had to score it using stock tracks, which was a nightmare and not something that is very common. When the picture is locked on my end, it gets sent to the online editor for colour correction and final mastering.

Kolchak fucked around with this message at 22:01 on Mar 8, 2012

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