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Grog
Mar 31, 2007



I was going to mention that using a calibration device or at the least getting someone to calibrate your "pro" display is kind of critical if you're doing professional-level work, but people in that position should know that much already. Otherwise, colorimeters/spectros aren't usually needed unless you're personally critical of colour and want the best image out of your monitor.

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Grog
Mar 31, 2007



diehlr posted:

I impulse bought a U2711 the other night due to a coupon making the final price $719. I already have a U2410. I am starting to get a little worried that the tiny dot pitch on the U2711 is going to make things microscopic. Any owners out there have any opinions?
It kind of depends on what you're doing with the screen on a regular basis. I don't own one, but I've seen them in action. A certain degree will come down to personal preference, but I found the dot pitch too small. If you're doing regular reading and working with a lot of text, you're likely going to have to zoom in or increase the default OS text size, which can fix the issue at least partially. The dot pitch on a 30" is the smallest I can personally stand for all-around use (0.251mm at 2560x1600), and that's still larger than the 0.233mm pitch on a U2711. Those are also both smaller than the dot pitch on a 24" like the U2410 (0.277mm). If you're mainly using the screen for games and watching movies/TV, the smaller dot pitch of the U2711 could actually make things look crisper. Like I said, it depends.

Don't worry about anything until you actually get the thing and see it in action. Stress'll kill ya.

Also, DrDork, I think the issue was more with the "built into every card of the last 5+ years" comment, which is out of context and actually talking about the pair of digital chips and all of that.

Grog fucked around with this message at 20:08 on Dec 11, 2010

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



No, let's just straighten this out now so that it stops being an issue. The quote taken was only part of the full sentence, and so it was taken out of context and assumed to be talking about Eyefinity.

DrDork posted:

Like basically every card made in the last 5+ years, ATI cards incorporate a pair of physical chips that handle the digital output: this is what allows you to use two DVI ports simultaneously (or HDMI, or one of each). ATI takes this setup and tosses another bunch of circuitry in there to handle DisplayPort. The practical upshot is that an Eyefinity card can output at least 3 displays: 2x DVI/HDMI/VGA/whatever, and 1x DisplayPort.
He wasn't saying that cards from the past 5+ years had Eyefinity.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



There isn't really any point to buying a higher quality screen when you don't need it. The minimum brightness is probably the only thing I'd worry about if all you're doing is text work, just to turn it down to a comfortable level so it doesn't burn your retinas.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Kramjacks posted:

Has anyone bought anything from https://www.bestdirect.ca? They have the Dell U2711 for $746 canadian which is $100 cheaper than Dell.ca's sale price.
They're supposedly a sister company to NCIX, who also have the U2711 listed and it's in stock. So if you're looking at getting that monitor, you can always try price matching it at NCIX and get the extra options available there (mainly customer service and shipping options).

Still, the warranty terms when purchasing from a Dell reseller haven't really been cleared up yet. The product page on NCIX says 1 year, and apparently someone asked both a Dell and an NCIX rep about it. The Dell rep said 1 year, the NCIX rep said 3 years like it's supposed to be directly from Dell. It's probably a good idea to call and clarify with Dell what their policy is for reseller warranties.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Paino posted:

tl;dr: I'm a bit grumpy and think that LCDs should be replaced by a new technology that doesn't suck
Hm. Good luck with that idea. LCD currently takes up too much of the display industry's collective attention and makes up too much of their current market for the other technologies to make significant headway. So, you're probably going to be waiting a while before anything better comes out and then even longer before the new technology's at a palatable price.

Actually, when we get more widespread use of things like full RGB LED backlighting, that should help fix issues like poor black levels and contrast a bit more. I don't know how well they compare to the levels you can get with plasma, though.

Grog fucked around with this message at 05:42 on Jan 20, 2011

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



mobby_6kl posted:

Also, is it normal for LED backlights to produce noticeable bleeding even at normal viewing angles? This is a 2 second exposure so it's not that bad, but the orange/blue colors in the lower corners are fairly noticeable even in real use:
It depends. Not all monitors get great quality control, so you could get one with relatively poor consistency across the panel and in the backlighting. Others are just defective or messed up somehow. I think the orange/pink to blue/green shift is a regularly-mentioned problem people get with the current Dell IPS displays, too. You may have just gotten a bad one with a few different problems at the same time.

Also, I think the Dell U series still uses CCFLs for backlighting. The Apple Cinema's one of the few currently available IPS monitors that uses LEDs, but more are supposed to come out this year. I'm still hoping for a good replacement for my current 24".

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



I thought IPS glow was usually supposed to show up at angles outside of your straight-on viewing unless you're on something like a 30", but I guess not. As long as you're not looking at the screen from an angle, IPS glow shouldn't be much of an issue. On most PVA/MVA panels, you get some slightly annoying colour shift instead.

No matter what consumer monitor you pick, you're probably going to end up with at least some amount of backlight bleeding and panel uniformity issues. The higher-end NECs and some pricier monitors are supposed to have decent active correction to adjust for the uniformity problems, at least.

If the new consumer-level IPS monitors coming out don't improve on the current stuff, I think I'm just going to give up and get a Dell when they go on sale. Hell, I might do that anyway in the meantime. I'm still dealing with a BenQ FP241W, and the minimum brightness is somewhere around 220 cd/m^2. It might produce decent colours, but my eyes start to burn if I have to look at white for too long. It's a nice, clean, painfully piercing white, though.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Samsung might be coming out with a 24" 16:10 version of their S-PLS monitor. Other than that and ASUS's new IPS, yeah, there's not much from the 16:10 department.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



If you're fine with the way things look out of the box and don't care about getting accurate colours, then you don't really need to mess with anything. Calibration and the like is more for those of us who do colour-critical work or are extremely picky about having the monitor be as accurate as possible to the way the colours are supposed to be. Then you might have to deal with sRGB emulation modes and colorimeters/spectroradiometers and occasionally re-profiling... Fun.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Well, I'm still stupidly burning my retinas out with my BenQ FP241W. The overly bright backlighting has finally gotten to me, as I'm starting to get extremely sore eyes and headaches from it.

So, I need a replacement (or possibly replacements). Anybody got any ideas? I need something that I can use for general PC uses and PC gaming, as well as watching various media and occasional console gaming. From what I've seen, the only viable options are to get something like the U2410 which has a decent screen and a bunch of inputs, or get a relatively inexpensive TN monitor (or possibly an IPS like the U2311H when it goes on sale) for PC and PC gaming uses and then something like a good 32" HDTV for console gaming and to watch movies and stream media. I'm also trying to stick to a budget. The most I'd like to spend is probably ~$800 total if I were picking up both a monitor and TV.

Have colour reproduction and black depth improved at all on TN panels in the past couple of years? I mean in the sense that the colours they can actually display will be (at least mostly) accurate, and black will look black instead of just dark grey. Or is some form of IPS still the only real option right now if you want any kind of decent image quality? This isn't for an environment where I need a colour-perfect setup, but I do appreciate good colour reproduction.

Grog fucked around with this message at 08:42 on May 14, 2011

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



The U2410 was part of yesterday's deals, so they likely switched over mid-day or something. You missed out.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Hey. Guys. New colorimeter hardware from X-Rite to basically replace the i1Display 2.

Support for LED backlighting, wide gamuts, lower light readings to calibrate black levels better, etc... Sounds like a pretty nice step up. In Canada at least, it seems like the i1Display Pro model is going to sell for around $270 at launch, like the i1Display 2.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



I've been using a 42" LG TV (IPS panel) as my monitor for a while now. Did a basic setup, and after getting used to the larger pixels and a little extra input lag, it's a lot nicer than the FP241W it replaced. And since most of what I do on here now is gaming and watching movies/TV, the loss of 120 pixels in height was pretty much meaningless. I guess I like being subhuman.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Does anyone know how long the average CCFL-backlit LCD display lasts in colour critical setups? The best I've found is Eizo giving a warranty for the "brightness and colour" of their 4K monitors for up to 10,000 hours, but those have LED backlighting.

I've been using a TV (an LG 42LK450) as a monitor for maybe three and a half years at this point, and for at least the past year, the blue channel has been steadily losing luminance. It's probably the backlight degrading, I don't know. Basic calibration-wise, I can't get a relatively steady 2.20 gamma anymore if the peak white is set above 90 cd/mē, and if it keeps going at this pace it'll likely drop below 80 by next summer. That'll be around four years before it hits overly dim levels, which seems kind of short to me. The backlight has been set below the halfway mark for a long time, and the other basic settings have all been set like you would for a normal pre-calibration. I'll probably have to replace it within the next year because it's not likely worth paying to replace the backlight, but I'm guessing I shouldn't expect much more from cheaper TVs like this one, right?

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



DrDork posted:

Also because, with a few exceptions, text looks like crap on TV's, which makes them pretty sub-optimal for use in a lot of general purpose or other text-heavy uses. But if all you want to do is connect a PC up so you can watch all your downloaded porn and play a few rounds of Killing Floor or Warhammer: Rat Exterminator, then have at.
Yeah, if you want your TV to function as an overall monitor, then you should specifically be looking for a TV that has the capability to use an RGB/4:4:4 signal and figure out how to get that working. Then text will look generally fine/not blurry and colours won't look as washed out as they might otherwise. That was one of the only reasons I bought my TV in the first place. I knew it could pass 4:4:4, but to get that working I have to use a DVI-HDMI cable and put an EDID override in the Nvidia drivers. On this specific model, that cuts off the audio portion of the signal and just makes it a "DVI - PC display" to the system. As far as I know, there's also an option to do it on AMD cards, I just haven't had an AMD/ATI card since my 9600 XT.

There are threads scattered around the web listing which models can pass a 4:4:4/RGB signal, including 4K at 60 Hz. I haven't been looking recently, so I don't know how exhaustive or up-to-date they are at this point.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



xthetenth posted:

Why would you want a non-curved 30+" ultrawide?
Maybe in addition to the gaming purposes (assuming because of the references to *Sync and 100+ Hz) they want it for creative/professional use where any image distortion would be a bad thing. Or maybe they just don't like how the curved image looks.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Truga posted:

I think this is the best thread to ask:

A friend of mine bought a 4k screen recently, and frankly, while the resolution is great, it looks like poo poo compared to my ancient 30". What's a good tool to colour calibrate a monitor? USB monitor calibration thingies on amazon go from like $50 to $5000 and pretty much all have inconclusive or no reviews. Anyone know a good one that isn't on the expensive side?
It kind of depends on how deep you want to go with this stuff. For just basic use, the simplest recommendation is usually a ColorMunki Display with either its basic software or the free ArgyllCMS+DisplayCAL, or the i1Display Pro with its slightly more advanced software or the same DisplayCAL setup. Those basically just require a little reading/learning and then some patience to let the colorimeter work through the measurements. I think I spent around $190 CAD on my ColorMunki a couple of years ago. They seem to sell for around $155 USD new.

X-Rite's ColorMunki Display with free software like DisplayCAL for profiling and very basic calibration, or HCFR for more in-depth on-display calibration (which depends on the level of control you have on the display itself) is pretty much the cheapest very accurate option for most standard LCDs and LED-backlit LCDs. The ColorMunki Display comes with its own software, it just generally doesn't provide the same level of control over the profiling and calibration options. It's supposed to be wizard-driven and very easy to use, I just honestly don't remember much about it since I started using dispcalGUI (DisplayCAL's old name) as soon as I got mine. The retail i1Display Pro is basically the exact same hardware as the ColorMunki Display, but with a faster possible measurement speed (adjustable), and its included software allows for more control than the version for the ColorMunki. If you use DisplayCAL, you can just save the money and buy a ColorMunki Display. With that, they give the same accuracy in the end.

The Datacolor Spyder meters still don't provide the same level of accuracy as the X-Rite meters do, so you're getting a better deal with something like a ColorMunki Display than you would with any of those.

Depending on the level of control available on the display itself (if it just has separate RGB controls, or if there are more advanced options like 10- or 20-point grayscale adjustments, etc.), you could potentially get a good calibration on the screen itself and wouldn't have to worry about programs/games not recognizing a software colour profile. Otherwise, you'd mostly be relying on profiling software like DisplayCAL to create a corrected profile for the display and hope that those programs/games don't override or ignore it.

For more advanced stuff, if you want to possibly use other (paid) software like basICColor Display, ChromaPure, SpectraCAL or others, you'd need to find out what colorimeters they support. I don't keep up with the paid packages, but most of them used to require an OEM version of the i1Display Pro (i1Display 3, i1 Display III Pro, etc.) instead of the retail version. At least some of them apparently support both now.

Newer technologies like OLED might require corrections/profiling against a spectrophotometer to get better accuracy, but if there's an existing color correction matrix or spectral sample file available for that display or a similar one, then you can probably still get "good enough" results from that. DisplayCAL's website has a list of user-contributed corrections that might be helpful. Colorimeters also generally read darker levels better than spectros, so the spectros won't be as useful for shadow detail and black level measurements. The ColorMunki Display/i1Display Pro read pretty dark (supposedly down to 0.002 or 0.003 cd/m^2, according to a few people's tests), but that's not as dark as one of the two certification requirement options for an "Ultra HD" HDR display (more than 540 and less than 0.0005 cd/m^2).

If anybody has more to add, feel free. I need sleep.

Grog fucked around with this message at 12:53 on Aug 1, 2016

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Eh, having used a 42" 1080p TV as a monitor for years, the text isn't that bad even from a few feet away. You can notice the pixels if you're looking for them so it's not amazingly smooth-looking by any means, but it's still easily readable. You could probably live with it at a smaller size like 32", but really, you'd just have to see it for yourself to know whether or not a lower pixel density is acceptable to you.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



CharlieFoxtrot posted:

I also took a look at the calibration section of the OP, is that all still relevant?
If you're talking about the basic/free calibration information, then mostly, although it looks like it's missing specifics for basic test patterns and related things. (edit: Actually, that http://tft.vanity.dk is mentioned, which might work as well. Didn't check it fully, though, so I don't know.) I haven't used any of them in a while, but you can probably still use lagom.nl for basic settings. Without an instrument, you're just eyeballing things as best as you can. For actual instrument-based calibration and profiling, anything in the OPs regarding colorimeters is outdated.

Grog fucked around with this message at 02:54 on Sep 6, 2016

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



How far away do you sit from your monitor? Honestly, after getting used to a 42" 16:9 screen, even the 34" ultrawides seem overly short now for my comfortable viewing distance/desk setup (around 3'). 16 inches tall seems like a decent compromise height to me, but that would be equivalent to either a ~32/33" 16:9 or a 41" 21:9 screen. I'm guessing there won't be any higher resolution, high refresh panels in those kinds of sizes/dimensions for a while.

Comparing those 40" 4K screens to the 34" ultrawides makes me think I'd rather get 4K and set up a custom 21:9 resolution on it if I really wanted to use that. The resolution and dimensions would still end up bigger than a 34" ultrawide.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



KingEup posted:

As long as you're happy to game without gsync and no more than 60Hz then that is the sensible thing to do.
Yeah, those are the main downsides right now. I'd rather wait to replace my current screen until they have bigger displays with a higher refresh rate and some form of Adaptive-Sync or at least G-Sync.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Does anybody know how to ensure that your display's physical screen is flat/even? I don't know what happened when we were moving things around here, but now when I'm sitting in front of my screen, it looks either like parts of it are bowing in slightly or other parts are bowing out slightly compared to the rest. I can't swivel or adjust it to make it look right and now I can't really ignore it, so I can't seem to get comfortable sitting in front of it anymore. Nothing looks damaged, but I don't really know how to check for an uneven screen surface, what to do to fix it if that's what's going on, or if something like that can actually be fixed.

My vision may also be messed up right now, for all I know, which could be contributing to things. Checking with one eye or the other still has things looking wrong, though.

Grog fucked around with this message at 07:47 on Nov 11, 2016

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Thanks for the advice. I tried that earlier and I'm not seeing anything major on the screen itself, so I think my vision is just getting supremely messed up by something. I guess I get to wait on appointments and deal with my doctors again. Yay.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Okay, so now that I've had more time to sit in front of it, my TV actually does seem to have been damaged. There are five or six dark blue spots on one side that show up on dark backgrounds. I don't know if that's from physical trauma to the front of the screen or what. My wild guess would be that the screen got hit by something and those spots are now letting extra backlight through, or something along those lines.

Has anybody here had a monitor/TV repaired out of warranty? Is it ever worth getting the screen replaced, or are you basically just better off buying a new display?

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Thanks for the advice. It's a 2011 model, so I'm probably out of luck on getting things replaced except possibly on special order. I did a cursory search on a few replacement parts sites but came up with nothing for screens. People just seem to carry the circuit boards and remotes. The spots aren't very noticeable, mostly just on very dark colours like pure black and similar shades near that level of darkness, so I can probably hold off until at least Black Friday or later.

So, are there any (non-ultrawide) IPS/AHVA/similar monitors at or near 1080p and around 28-32" with decent colour controls and are at least somewhat okay for gaming? Do any of the 4K monitors around that size scale 1080p well? I'd probably rather not use another 40+" TV as a monitor if I can help it, but I can't really afford to spend even more to replace the GTX 1060 I got a couple of months ago in order to drive 1440p or higher in games.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Sidesaddle Cavalry posted:

Samsung and LG fight each other in this segment with competing IPS panels: Samsung S32F351 and LG 32MP58HQ-P. You can also buy a sad, sad QNIX gaming monitor that only has a 144Hz TN panel with no variable refresh (-Sync) at all: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...=9SIA2RY4AS9055
Thanks for pointing out some options. Both of them seem to be available at the local (Canadian) Best Buy. I think I'm going to have to physically check out whatever's available locally, do some research into the 4K options, and maybe just put up with what I have right now until I can afford a new monitor and possibly a video card to drive it properly.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Not necessarily monitor-specific, but has anybody else experienced something like this? I was reading a bunch of printed material away from any screens for most of the day, eventually got back to my phone and it looked blurry/smeary, then checked my monitor and it's the same. They're both fairly standard 60 Hz IPS displays. It's like being away from these things for a day has suddenly made me see 60 Hz as terrible and slow.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Unfortunately, I've already had to wear glasses for about 17 years and had a recent exam where they said nothing had changed. Guess my eyes are just getting worse. Or maybe I need a new optometrist.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



B-Mac posted:

Anyone have recommendations for a color calibration tool? I don't do a ton of photo editing, thought my wife might start with the newborn in the house and her interest in picking up a DSLR for family stuff. I see they can range from $70 (Colormunki Smile) up to $220 (i1 Display Pro).
It kind of depends on the calibration/profiling software you're using, but X-Rite's ColorMunki Display is still currently the best value for a colorimeter if you're willing to use free software packages like DisplayCAL and HCFR. You can get the same quality of results with a ColorMunki Display as you can with an i1 Display Pro, as they're literally the same hardware but with a different maximum speed limit set in the firmware. The ColorMunki Display/i1 Display Pro/i1D3 is still the best consumer-level colorimeter you can buy for accuracy at this point. The last time I checked, the general opinion of the various "colour experts"/calibration pros was that Datacolor's Spyder5 still hasn't caught up to X-Rite.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Paul MaudDib posted:

I blame the software here, I don't think it was meant for W10, and TFT probably isn't the correct mode, given that I have an IPS panel I would think "LCD" is the right mode to use. Is there any open-source software that I could try?
DisplayCAL has the i1Display 2 in its list of supported devices. You can always try it and see if it works any better before you go and buy a new colorimeter. Also yeah, if it's significantly cheaper to get that Eizo EX3 over the ColorMunki then it's probably fine. Even if it's not as accurate, it should still get you a lot better calibrated than a degraded sensor.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Paul MaudDib posted:

I don't have any on-monitor adjustment for color (there is supposedly a "User" settings mode but it doesn't let me adjust colors). On the NVIDIA control panel colors tab I enabled the user mode and adjusted the blue channel, but anything I adjust will change the color of the backdrop (but not the square at the center that's being balanced) and then immediately undo as I release the mouse button, even if I apply the settings. Not sure how to proceed.
It seems extremely unlikely that the colour channels would be that imbalanced, if that monitor's in some kind of default state or a preset. The i1D2 is apparently known for relatively fast filter degradation, along with not handling LED backlights well, so if it's fairly old and/or if you're using a newer LED-backlit monitor then it might just be a matter of the i1Display 2 not being useful for your purposes anymore. Also, 170 cd/m^2 is maybe a bit bright. The usual maximum people suggest to calibrate for brightly lit rooms is 120.

What monitor are you using this on? Even if there aren't individual colour channel settings, is there anything like colour temperature presets that you can adjust (like Cold, Warm, etc.)? I know some monitors are supposed to have service menus with more settings, but you'd have to look that up for your specific model to see if anybody has figured out how to access that on your model and whether there are any useful settings in there. You can still profile the monitor if you can't do a proper calibration beforehand, it just might not look as consistently good. Laptops and the like don't usually have access to colour controls either, and they can still be profiled decently.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



I forgot about the laptop mode. I use that on my parents' laptop but it's been a while since I've done anything more than a 10-point calibration for my own screen.

Yeah, as mentioned, if you want an accurate setup and your equipment is more complicated than a single monitor or type of monitor/panel, you'll probably need a good spectrophotometer to profile against in addition to a colorimeter, or to get your colorimeter profiled against somebody else's quality spectro if you want your stuff to match as closely as possible. There are also companies who sell pre-corrected colorimeters, if you want to go that route. The differences in the physical characteristics between different models/panels/types of display apparently make it hard to match multiple monitors otherwise (I don't have a multi-monitor setup). I'm guessing most people who just want more consistently smooth and accurate colours and grayscales won't care enough to spend the extra money and effort for a spectro and the required setup. Or they forgo all of the hassle and get a professional to do everything.

Personally, I just bought my ColorMunki to get a better calibration than using lagom.nl and adjusting by eye. It should probably be profiled against a spectro but I also probably won't do that in the near future. If I was doing professional, colour-critical work, I'd likely need more than the cheap setup I currently have.

Speaking of all of this, has anybody here calibrated an OLED yet? It sounds like it's a lot more involved of a process, and standard LCDs can already take a while.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



There can be colour shift as well. If that one has actually been in use for the past decade, it might be losing contrast/brightness overall. You can still correct for that at least somewhat. I'm dealing with that kind of shift on my 2011 TV that's slowly losing contrast in the red channel, and losing it faster in the blue. It's down to a max of around 90 cd/m^2 on the blues now.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



If you can actually find a replacement backlight and replace it or have it replaced for a decent amount cheaper than buying a new monitor, then it's probably worth looking into at least. I would have done that on mine, but decided to just wait for it to die so I can get something smaller and faster.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Nebakenezzer posted:

Price point ~$200 cdn.I'd like IPS if that's advisable. I play games, but as you can tell I'm not on the bleeding edge of anything. I just want to play modern titles. I'm Wary of Asus, as that poo poo seems likely to break on me. I live in a small town; finding IPS is tricky. The good computer stone stocks a few dell that *might* be IPS, Asus, and weirdly HP monitors that don't get much of a look-in around here. I'm thinking of ordering from one of the big web sites. I'm also (if you couldn't tell) a Keeper; I use stuff a long time if I can, so reliability is something that's good.
Like AVeryLargeRadish said, Dell's probably your best choice for warranty. Dell's Canadian website also has the S2316H (on sale) and the SE2416H (regular price) for $200. Somebody else can point out any differences I'm missing, but comparing the S2316H and M (the one that Radish linked), the H has HDMI and built-in speakers while the M has DVI and no speakers, but the M is also selling regularly for $280 on Dell's website. The SE2416H is 23.8" vs 23.0" on the other two, also has HDMI instead of DVI, and says it's anti-glare vs "glossy with low-haze" on the S2316H/M (except then they all say they're anti-glare in their specs). They're all supposed to be IPS. They also have various other models around that price, but I have no idea what the meaningful differences are between them all.

Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Atomizer posted:

I've been using one of these colorimeters on all my displays, and I was wondering if anyone else has experience with it. It seems to result in a slightly different image on every monitor I've calibrated, and I don't do anything color-sensitive anyway. Is this thing nevertheless doing its job, or is it a waste of time because it's not a higher-end model, etc.?
I don't know the specifics of working with a ColorMunki Smile in particular, but are you just using the included software? What's your calibration/profiling workflow? Are the displays of different types? Does the software have any options for choosing the appropriate type of display that you're currently calibrating/profiling or choosing a colour correction file for different display types to make sure it's at least trying to correct for things like CCFL-backlit IPS/TN, LED-backlit IPS/TN, plasma, etc.? Things like that might account for larger differences between displays, but they also only correct to a certain degree when you don't have a reference meter to correct the colorimeter's own discrepancies. You probably won't get everything to look exactly the same (or as close as possible) without a more elaborate setup and extra equipment. That's part of why some people pay calibrators to do this stuff. e: You can get closer if you're using the same model of display/monitor, and in general most colorimeters should still be closer than if you try to calibrate things by eye, but it won't get the same results as having extras like a reference grade spectrometer and all of that jazz.

If you aren't already and you're willing to put a little bit of extra effort in, you can also use DisplayCAL for more advanced calibration and profiling options. If you're working on TVs with things like 10+ point white point calibration and colour management systems, you could also try more advanced manual calibration with software like HCFR.

Grog fucked around with this message at 01:58 on Nov 27, 2017

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Grog
Mar 31, 2007



Typical posted:

Hey goons, I need a couple of 23-24 inch monitors for making art on and being color accurate. I work TV animation, and I am often asked to paint things and I need my color range more consistent with other people in the industry.
Just thought it was worth asking, but do you have some sort of calibration and profiling solution already? Since you're actually working, I'm guessing you do have something just to make sure you're actually getting and can maintain the colour accuracy you're looking for.

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