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funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



You want to start with the EMI album with him conducting the Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima on it.

He has lots of real boring neo-romantic stuff that I never bothered to investigate but some of the choral stuff is cool too IIRC and the St. Luke Passion is great. Personally I'd get a bunch of Ligeti and Xenakis after checking out the Threnody disc and the Passion

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crazyvanman
Dec 31, 2010


Herr Napalm posted:

I'm kind of surprised that you note no. 12 as being the one that you can play, as it's regarded to be one of the most difficult to actually get right.

Really? It's certainly more difficult than some of the others (Danseuses de Delphes or La fille aux chevuex de lin) but it's far from impossible. Once you realise that the chords involved are really quite simple it's not that difficult.

Although, yes, I admit it's taken a fair amount of work to get my fingers round some of the trickier sections. I'll be performing it in a school music festival in a couple of months time, so it should be ready by then.

In my mind you can never 'finish' learning a piece like this, though. There's always something to add to it, whether it be dynamics or some articulation.

Having said all this I will say that I can by no means play to a performance standard any of the other preludes, as aside from the other two I mentioned which I have played perhaps three or four times, any venturing into the preludes beyond has been no more than some casual sightreading.

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


crazyvanman posted:

Really? It's certainly more difficult than some of the others (Danseuses de Delphes or La fille aux chevuex de lin) but it's far from impossible. Once you realise that the chords involved are really quite simple it's not that difficult.

Although, yes, I admit it's taken a fair amount of work to get my fingers round some of the trickier sections. I'll be performing it in a school music festival in a couple of months time, so it should be ready by then.


Playing the notes in no. 12 is rather simple, actually getting the 'feel' (or as Hoffman likes to say, the 'style') of the piece is devilishly difficult. The best relation is probably the 2nd movement of Gaspard. Compared to Ondine or Scarbo, it seems relatively technically straight forward. However, it's probably the most challenging of the three to actually accomplish. (Perlamuter claims that there are 37 different touches that a pianist needs to have mastered. For a single piece! Thats maybe 5 or 6 pages long! Almost each note is played completely different than the one before it.)

This particular prelude is much the same. A lot of it has to do with the way that Debussy uses sonority. It's widely accepted that no one understood the depth and range of the different areas of the piano better than Debussy. The same chord played in different registers is not supposed to sound even vaguely similar to its analogue in another register. Hinson, who wrote the complete pianist repetoire, and is known for his massive habit of understatement (He calls one of the Liszt Transcendental Etudes "tricky") says the following of no. 12: "A vision in sound of the submerged Cathedral of Ys (as you noted)...Spans almost the entire keyboard. Needs precise pedaling, tempo continuity, and wide tonal range."

French Impressionists are very very hard, but cheers to you for undertaking it. No. 12 is almost universally avoided in both competition and recital for the above reasons. (I could go into more specificity of the piece itself, but this doesn't seem like the thread for total piano sperging. )


Can I Phaser You posted:

I was required to take a music/art class in order to graduate from the university I went to, and I randomly picked a class about Bach. It was one of the best decisions I have ever made in my life. I was (and still am) an ignorant person when it comes to "classical music", but the one thing I can definitively say is that J.S. Bach was a genius. We are truly privileged to be living in a day and age where you can instantly listen to music like this.

Thank Mendelssohn! He was known to a lot of people, but Mendelssohn is probably responsible for the onus that we place on him today. (Probably the only nice thing I have to say about Mendelssohn, really. I'm not a big fan.)

crazyvanman
Dec 31, 2010


Herr Napalm posted:

but this doesn't seem like the thread for total piano sperging.


I would agree totally with what you said of the piece. And as much as I'd love to discuss the specifics of this piece, I also agree that this isn't the place. Let's hope I can come somewhere close to doing it justice. Good to see someone who really appreciates the work.

For now, I'll stick to recommending other works to people who are new to classical music, as I guess is more the purpose of this thread. This is, in my opinion, one of the most beautiful pieces of music I have ever heard. It is Brahms' Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Opus 115. My personal favourite is the first movement, but honestly all four are divine. It's always reminded me of a beautiful autumn (fall) day, but I don't know why.

Anyway, here's the links:

First movement - http://www.youtube.com/user/markcuer#p/u/9/iUp4gcbY3L8
http://www.youtube.com/user/markcuer#p/u/8/yz5KqB0gBvM

Second movement - http://www.youtube.com/user/markcuer#p/u/7/we-H7u4PB1w
http://www.youtube.com/user/markcuer#p/u/6/rDILF6flNbk

Third movement - http://www.youtube.com/user/markcuer#p/u/11/R73InRTGBkI

Fourth movement - http://www.youtube.com/user/markcuer#p/u/10/sPVzRk0-g1Q

Dr. Witherbone
Nov 1, 2010

CHEESE LOOKS ON IN
DESPAIR BUT ALSO WITH
AN ERECTION


Ah, good, a classical thread! I was hoping one of these would turn up.

So, who's down for a little bit of baroque silliness with good old Handel? I'm going to ignore Water Music, just because everybody knows it.

Zadok The Priest is pretty great if you ask me. Take a listen:
http://listen.grooveshark.com/s/Zad...st/1eVRSY?src=5

While we're with Handel, have some Gloria In Excelsis Deo Trump, one of my personal favorites: http://listen.grooveshark.com/s/Glo...rump/TzMP?src=5

Any other Handel fans out there? This is barely scratching the surface of his works.

Alabaster Disaster
Feb 8, 2008
Forget about it

the Bunt posted:

I'm guessing this is the best place to ask for this. I would like a nice introduction to Krystof Penderecki. I've heard a lot of his works in movies but am not familiar with any actual pieces. I really love the dreadful sounds he came up with. Anyone similarly horrifying is welcome.

Penderecki didn't really write a lot in that style afterwards. As far as creepy sounds though I know exactly who you would like, George Crumb.

Black Angels has parts like Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima, but he includes an amazing range of sounds and feelings without sacrificng any tenseness and the diversity keeps it an interesting listen for the duration of the piece, which you can't say about a lot of similar compositions.

Foyes36
Oct 23, 2005

Food fight!

Two pages, and barely any opera?

One of my favorites is from Die Zauberflöte -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Kkd...feature=related

You also really can't beat Don Giovanni
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dK1_vm0FMAU

Samuel Ramey is the best.

Parsifal
Jan 1, 2009

wel accually u forgot Dolan


Milton Babbitt died Saturday at age 94. RIP. I'm never been a big fan of his "serial" music but he was an important figure in the American avant-garde.

Oh and Elliott Carter is 102 and shows no signs of slowing down.

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



In the Recommendation thread, this person asked about choral music:

Fodder Cannon posted:

Where do I start with choral music? I only know Miserere Mei, Deus and God in Disguise. Should I dive deeper into Allegri? Where do I go next?

His post prompted me to look into what he mentioned, and I really like it. He hasn't gotten any replies so I wanted to ask here for similar suggestions. I checked out the modern choral link in this thread but I didn't really like it. I would like to know who else to check out from the same time frame as Allegri's work. I also sent Fodder Cannon a PM letting him know I'm cross posting since there might be better suggestions in this thread.

crazyvanman
Dec 31, 2010


Chinaski posted:


I would like to know who else to check out from the same time frame as Allegri's work.

Obvious answer: Bach chorales like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVa3...feature=related

More interesting answer is John Tavener's The Lamb. Although it's modern, it's definitely worth listening to, and remains fairly traditional. It's bitonal at the beginning, and will probably cause you to cringe. But then it turns beautiful. And makes grown men weep. It's based on a poem by William Blake.

My favourite recording of it is This: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVa3...eature=related.

The bass line is brilliant to sing, because it's the easiest but most effective part.

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



crazyvanman posted:

Choral suggestions

Thanks! And as a follow up question related to classical music in general, how does one learn how to pick out quality recordings of music? Is it just a learned familiarity with a particular set of musicians or is it defined more by the record label?

crazyvanman
Dec 31, 2010


Chinaski posted:

Is it just a learned familiarity with a particular set of musicians or is it defined more by the record label?

I think it is mainly down to personal preference, and admittedly the recording that you happen to come across first. I personally usually have a favourite recording of a given piece according to how I would have played the piece myself, or if it's an ensemble, just the recording that appeals to me personally.

For example, Vladimir Ashkenazy's recording of Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata is something I cannot get along with, simply because he expresses the dynamics differently to how I do. This isn't to say I'm claiming to be better than him, just that when I listen to his recording I can't help but compare it to my own and therefore don't enjoy it properly. This again is most likely just because I happened to see this piece performed live by a different pianist before I heard Vlad's recording, and so have a personal bias towards a particular way of playing the piece.

With 'The Lamb', that also happens to be the first recording I heard of it (aside from my school choir's painful attempt) and is to this day my favourite.

Obviously there are exceptions, and sometimes you'll find a recording that just seems to nail it for you more than any other, or even a newly released recording of it can overtake the old.

Generally it's just whatever works for you, probably especially so with choral music, seeing as you could find a really dreadful choir absolutely butcher a song.

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


Chinaski posted:

Thanks! And as a follow up question related to classical music in general, how does one learn how to pick out quality recordings of music? Is it just a learned familiarity with a particular set of musicians or is it defined more by the record label?

This is a really interesting question, as it gets to the heart of a lot of the back in forth in classical music. Interpretation is pretty much key, and the exact same piece can be played in a huge number of different ways.

Here's a quick example--the following is three different recordings of the third movement of Beethoven's 14th sonata:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqSulR9Fymg -- This is Wilhelm Kempf's playing. Kempf is eminently classical in his approach to the piece, and is more playing a rendition rather than an interpretation--i.e. very little pedal, very strict adherence to dynamics, no romantic liberties with tonality or speed.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNuw7HC6sBs -- This is probably my favorite, but I'm much more of a romantic pianist. Horowitz uses pedal, interprets dynamics, speed, etc. But the way he plays the piece is completely different from Kempf.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVZq...feature=related -- This is Glenn Gould. This is an absurd feet of technical virtuosity, but I can't really stand it.

What I'm trying to get at is that anyone who's good enough to record a CD with a classical label is going to be a fantastic musician, but there are vast differentiations in interpretation of a single piece of music. Picking out interpretations and where you stand is really important in gaining a critical ear for listening to the music.

Mahlertov Cocktail
Mar 1, 2010

I ate your Mahler avatar! Hahahaha!

breaks posted:

If you like big and dramatic, you might check out some of Mahler's symphonies. He was a late Romantic guy, about a hundred years after Mozart, and his work is nothing if not big and dramatic. For example, the end of his 2nd is awesomely over-the-top: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsicaSxh7_Y

The 8th is probably my favorite. On the downside, many of them are 80+ minutes long and Mahler really liked to expound upon themes at incredible length. Particularly if you're not already accustomed to listening through lengthy pieces of classical music, they can try your patience a bit.

This, all the way. As my username might indicate, I love Mahler's music so much. The first, second, and fifth symphonies are my favorites, and each one is unique and interesting thematically.

Elephant posted:

Seconding that bit about the end of Mahler's 2nd Symphony. He calls for a group of brass players and percussionists to go off stage, and it creates this eerie distant effect that adds to the already ridiculous raucousness of the piece.

I love the off-stage brass parts, especially in the fifth movement.

A Jupiter
Apr 25, 2010


Wow! This thread gave me a lot of new music to listen to. Though rather than just contributing something, I have a question for all you classical nerds.

I've recently been obsessed with the Building Themes of the Sims.
Building Mode 1
Building Mode 3
Building Mode 5

I'm looking to find what exactly this kind of music is grouped as. I'd like to say it's romantic music, but it seems more adventurous and expressive. It does bear a resemblance to something like Debussy's Arabesque No.1 and Claire de Lune in its almost transcendent, fluid melody.

The only similar song(s) I've found is a suite called the Time Curve Preludes by William Duckworth, though that is labelled as "post-minimalist".

Thanks again for all the great songs that have been posted in this thread!

Art Alexakis
Mar 27, 2008


There are 12 people in the world the rest are paste

(USER WAS BANNED FOR THIS POST)

hoonchops
Mar 4, 2009

Schadenfreude is so nutritious

Requiem in D minor, Gabriel Fauré. words fail me.

breaks
May 12, 2001



Thought I'd leave a few links to a few of my favorite youtube things...

Sibelius's 7th, god drat masterful piece of music, the progression, the ebb and flow, the melodies, would kill for him to have not burned the 8th.

Christian Ferras tears it up: Sibelius's Violin Concerto Franck's Violin Sonata

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



Herr Napalm posted:

This is a really interesting question, as it gets to the heart of a lot of the back in forth in classical music. Interpretation is pretty much key, and the exact same piece can be played in a huge number of different ways.
...
What I'm trying to get at is that anyone who's good enough to record a CD with a classical label is going to be a fantastic musician, but there are vast differentiations in interpretation of a single piece of music. Picking out interpretations and where you stand is really important in gaining a critical ear for listening to the music.

Thanks - this is very helpful. I'm not very musically intelligent so I don't grasp the subtle technical nuances of playing but I know what moves me emotionally.

I'll keep digging around, to see what else I like. I live just outside DC, so I might check out a concert at the National Cathedral as well. This stuff must be very impressive live.

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


Chinaski posted:

Thanks - this is very helpful. I'm not very musically intelligent so I don't grasp the subtle technical nuances of playing but I know what moves me emotionally.

I'll keep digging around, to see what else I like. I live just outside DC, so I might check out a concert at the National Cathedral as well. This stuff must be very impressive live.

Live classical music when its done well is a wonderful experience. Its very hard to capture the full effect and power of an actual symphony in any environment other than a symphony hall. I would suggest it!

breaks posted:

Sibelius

I quite like Sibelius. He takes a long time to say anything, but it's usually pretty great when he finally does make his point. I had the opportunity to see his 2nd symphony at the Jackson Hole music festival a couple years ago, and it was a fabulous piece of music, even if the performance had a couple slight issues. (They got way too loud in the 2nd movement; the end resolution wasn't as powerful as it could be, etc. etc.)

A Jupiter posted:

I'm looking to find what exactly this kind of music is grouped as. I'd like to say it's romantic music, but it seems more adventurous and expressive. It does bear a resemblance to something like Debussy's Arabesque No.1 and Claire de Lune in its almost transcendent, fluid melody.

I think the post-minimalist comparison is apt. This actually sort of reminds me of John Adams' piano work--it's got the same sort of rhythmic left hand work that's so important in most of his compositions.

Abel Wingnut
Dec 23, 2002



Is there an online compendium detailing each recorded version of classical works? I'm trying to figure out the best version of Romeo and Juliet and I can't find any sort of consensus, and thought there might be some site that does this for all of classical music.

Dr. Video Games 0081
Jan 19, 2005

He tries to tell people that he is alone, all by himself; he wants to love and be loved. His music is a call for acceptance, respect, love, underst

Abel Wingnut posted:

Is there an online compendium detailing each recorded version of classical works? I'm trying to figure out the best version of Romeo and Juliet and I can't find any sort of consensus, and thought there might be some site that does this for all of classical music.

On allmusic.com you can look up a composer and then see a listing of his works (or look up the work directly, although the search doesn't work that well for classical works), and from there get a list of recordings of that work. I don't think the lists are always complete, though.

Books like the Penguin and NPR guides to classical music also specialize in giving advice as to which recordings of pieces to get.

It should be pretty easy to find professional reviews of recordings, and sometimes amazon reviewers are even knowledgeable and informative in their reviews.

Dr. Video Games 0081 fucked around with this message at Feb 5, 2011 around 23:24

The Black Stones
May 7, 2007

COMPUTERS!
COMPUTERS!
YAAAAAAAAY!

This seems like the place to ask. I know gently caress all about classical music, but I've managed to hear some Chopin in some of my other hobbies and I've gotten really interested in picking up a collection of his works. But I don't know where to start, I'm basically looking for a CD (or CD's) that have a decent collection of them. If anybody can recommend something (If you're going to use Amazon, I'm in Canada, so Amazon.ca is preferred) I would appreciate it.

Fail-Bot
Jun 27, 2008

run:cakemaker.exe
processing...
...
...
...
ERROR

The Black Stones posted:

This seems like the place to ask. I know gently caress all about classical music, but I've managed to hear some Chopin in some of my other hobbies and I've gotten really interested in picking up a collection of his works. But I don't know where to start, I'm basically looking for a CD (or CD's) that have a decent collection of them. If anybody can recommend something (If you're going to use Amazon, I'm in Canada, so Amazon.ca is preferred) I would appreciate it.

There's a lot of debate on who performs Chopin best (as could be said of all classical performances) but I would suggest either Maurizio Pollini:

http://www.amazon.ca/24-Etudes-Op10...97257466&sr=1-1

or Lang Lang. Lang Lang gets a pretty bad rap for looking goofy when he plays, but I still think he's an excellent pianist.

On that note, while most people claim the Romantic era to be the best era (with some of the best composers coming out of it such as Beethoven, Chopin, Debussy, Rachmaninoff, etc...), one of my absolute favourite composers is Claudio Monteverdi who comes from the Renaissance era. His style of choral writing is so straight-forward, but so very beautiful:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c477V0X3_k8

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


The Black Stones posted:

This seems like the place to ask. I know gently caress all about classical music, but I've managed to hear some Chopin in some of my other hobbies and I've gotten really interested in picking up a collection of his works. But I don't know where to start, I'm basically looking for a CD (or CD's) that have a decent collection of them. If anybody can recommend something (If you're going to use Amazon, I'm in Canada, so Amazon.ca is preferred) I would appreciate it.

Chopin wrote ALOT of piano music. I'd suggest staying away from the etudes initially. There are some that are very listenable, but they're primarily technical studies (Mastering the etudes is a good way of surmounting most of the problems with performing Chopin's music. It's not completely the case, but they go a long way. They're required learning in any conservatory worth its salt. This often leads to swearing and frazzled pianists as they are both quite challenging and also typically taken on in a relatively early phase of advanced development )

I would say that the pre-eminent Chopin interpreter recently has probably been Rubinstein. (I personally think Agerich is wonderful, but she's criticized, and perhaps rightly so, for taking liberties with the music.) Some good beginning listening for his music is probably more of a mish-mash, rather than a full set of either the etudes, nocturnes, etc.

This is probably your best bet: http://www.amazon.com/Chopin-Collec...97284239&sr=8-1

It's got all of the big pieces. The Polonaise Fantaisie is a personal favorite of mine both to listen and play. (I probably say this with too much gravitas. Any pianist worth his/her salt has likely had a crack at it, even if its not necessarily up to performance standards in their repertoire.) It's an excellent example of the sweeping Romantic epic.

The Black Stones
May 7, 2007

COMPUTERS!
COMPUTERS!
YAAAAAAAAY!

Thanks for the help. I'll check that out!

Fid
Dec 2, 2010

'Bout time this town had
a new Sheriff


crazyvanman posted:

Obvious answer: Bach chorales like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVa3...feature=related

More interesting answer is John Tavener's The Lamb. Although it's modern, it's definitely worth listening to, and remains fairly traditional. It's bitonal at the beginning, and will probably cause you to cringe. But then it turns beautiful. And makes grown men weep. It's based on a poem by William Blake.

My favourite recording of it is This: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVa3...eature=related.

The bass line is brilliant to sing, because it's the easiest but most effective part.

Yeah let's get some choral music in this bitch.

My favorite modern choral composer is Eric Whitacre. His stuff is approaching overplayed status in choral circles, but that doesn't make it any less brilliant or powerful.

He paints in colors using clusters of notes that clash but in really outstanding and pleasing ways.

This is probably the best example of his work: Lux Arumque (do yourself a favor and listen with headphones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1sYkJHipvg

The text is pretty simple.

Light,
warm and heavy as pure gold
and the angels sing softly
to the new-born baby


I've probably performed this piece either singing or conducting at least 100 times. Some chords of note, just to illustrate what he does, his two basic chord families are like at 0:43 that are bright and ringing, and then at 2:30 which are dark and really bitey.

The way he works with dynamics and note clusters is just gorgeous, and he's one of the most effective composers at text-painting that I know.

Some other works of note:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsLiivVgxmM Leonardo Dreams of his Flying Machine: conducted by the man himself. This is Leonardo inventing and testing a flying machine. The Flight begins at 5:50 where Leonardo steels himself and jumps off a cliff. It's pretty awesome

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Zqp0OpzMAI Cloudburst: also directed by Whitacre with over 300 performers here, it's painting a picture of before, during, and after the rainstorm. I think it takes a bit long to get to the storm, so go to 5:25 if you get bored. The chord they start building around 6:00 will give you chills

If anyone has any choral music questions, hit me up

Mahlertov Cocktail
Mar 1, 2010

I ate your Mahler avatar! Hahahaha!

It's been a while since I listened to classical music--I hang out in my dorm's floor lounge a lot and it's not exactly the best music for DJ Mahlertov to pick, haha--but I'm working on a paper super-late tonight and since the place is abandoned decided to blast some Tchaik.

Man, I forgot just how much I love his 4th Symphony. Just... every part of every movement is so good. The first is so intense and the tail end is one of the darkest, most awesome endings to a movement. The second isn't Tchaik's best slow movement (that honor goes to the second movement of his Fifth, in my opinion), but it's still gorgeous. The third movement is just delightful--I love how the strings play pizz the whole time; it just adds to how cheerful it sounds. And, well, there's not much to say about the fourth movement/finale. It speaks for itself... very quickly, loudly, and energetically.


Edit: Incidentally, the version I have is with the Berliner Philharmoniker and Herbert von Karajan. Great combination for Tchaik symphonies.

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


Fid posted:

Yeah let's get some choral music in this bitch.

My favorite modern choral composer is Eric Whitacre. His stuff is approaching overplayed status in choral circles, but that doesn't make it any less brilliant or powerful.

He paints in colors using clusters of notes that clash but in really outstanding and pleasing ways.

This is probably the best example of his work: Lux Arumque (do yourself a favor and listen with headphones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1sYkJHipvg

The text is pretty simple.

Light,
warm and heavy as pure gold
and the angels sing softly
to the new-born baby


I've probably performed this piece either singing or conducting at least 100 times. Some chords of note, just to illustrate what he does, his two basic chord families are like at 0:43 that are bright and ringing, and then at 2:30 which are dark and really bitey.

The way he works with dynamics and note clusters is just gorgeous, and he's one of the most effective composers at text-painting that I know.

Some other works of note:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsLiivVgxmM Leonardo Dreams of his Flying Machine: conducted by the man himself. This is Leonardo inventing and testing a flying machine. The Flight begins at 5:50 where Leonardo steels himself and jumps off a cliff. It's pretty awesome

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Zqp0OpzMAI Cloudburst: also directed by Whitacre with over 300 performers here, it's painting a picture of before, during, and after the rainstorm. I think it takes a bit long to get to the storm, so go to 5:25 if you get bored. The chord they start building around 6:00 will give you chills

If anyone has any choral music questions, hit me up

Aarvo Part! (Not to detract from your post; I like Eric Whitacre a lot. His stuff is good. "When David Heard" [ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zOcXPeSufA ] is absolutely heart-rending.)

His style (Holy Minimalism) is some of the most amazing stuff I've ever heard. Ever. Miserere is completely mind blowing. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFPMpzJ2cNo

edit: oops! Wrong Miserere!

oilcheck my ass fucked around with this message at Feb 10, 2011 around 18:09

Fid
Dec 2, 2010

'Bout time this town had
a new Sheriff


I made a Pandora station on Whitacre, Part, and Tavener. It is loving great.

I've sung a handful of Part, his Magnificat and some of his partsongs.

A lot of his stuff is tough to do with high school kids, though, so I don't get much of a chance to direct it anymore.

Mahler
Oct 30, 2008

He does the crossword every day.

Mahlertov Cocktail posted:

It's been a while since I listened to classical music--I hang out in my dorm's floor lounge a lot and it's not exactly the best music for DJ Mahlertov to pick, haha--but I'm working on a paper super-late tonight and since the place is abandoned decided to blast some Tchaik.


Tchaikovsky's Fourth was the first piece of classical music I acquired from Limewire. 7 years later and I'm majoring in composition.

Mahlertov Cocktail
Mar 1, 2010

I ate your Mahler avatar! Hahahaha!

Mahler posted:

Tchaikovsky's Fourth was the first piece of classical music I acquired from Limewire. 7 years later and I'm majoring in composition.

Nice. I'm not quite that level (repping the German/psych majors), but I do love classical music.

Also, I like the name!

fougera
Apr 5, 2009


Should I learn Chopin's Andante Spianato and Grande Polonaise or Schumann's Fantasy. I would like to hear people's thoughts on their technical demands. This is more of a long term project as I am no longer playing/studying piano in a professional capacity.

KasualKon
Feb 11, 2011


Surprisingly, a lot of great music like what you're looking for comes from video games. This is I think the intro from Bayonetta, titled "One of a Kind", and it seems to be along the same lines as what you wanted in the OP.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKWgJNm9Mg0

Lynyrd Byrnstyn
Dec 28, 2005

by T. Fine


Elephant posted:

If you want something completely out of character with the rest of the stuff in this thread, check out Lincolnshire Posy by Percy Granger. A masochist and a xenophobe, Granger at one point spent years travelling around collecting traditional English folk songs on wax cylinders. He set six of them for wind band, and Lincolnshire Posy was the result. It's one of the hardest pieces to play for a wind ensemble, and even professionals have trouble with it.
Movement 1
Movement 2
Movement 3
Movement 4
Movement 5
Movement 6

Grainger's music is absolutely incredible, and he created the idea of elastic scoring, so you can find almost any of his pieces scored for wind band, orchestra, choir, piano, and sometimes chamber ensembles without having to look for a transcription.

My favorite Grainger piece is Irish Tune from County Derry, which is his arrangement of "Danny Boy". After hearing and playing Irish Tune, all other arrangements of Danny Boy just fall short to me. Grainger was a master of manipulating timbre.

Foyes36
Oct 23, 2005

Food fight!

Saxotillery posted:

My favorite Grainger piece is Irish Tune from County Derry, which is his arrangement of "Danny Boy". After hearing and playing Irish Tune, all other arrangements of Danny Boy just fall short to me. Grainger was a master of manipulating timbre.

That piece alone made me happy I played french horn in high school concert band.

Edit: Another great HS concert band song that made me a happy horn player - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzcoUDRR_7s

Foyes36 fucked around with this message at Feb 15, 2011 around 04:37

Hawkgirl
Jun 20, 2003

Jesus Died for Your Songs

Pfirti86 posted:

Edit: Another great HS concert band song that made me a happy horn player - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzcoUDRR_7s

Thanks for the memories I haven't heard Alfred Reed in a LONG time. My favorite Reed piece has got to be Russian Christmas Music though. I'm a huge sucker for epic Romantic-style pieces that take a long time to build, but are so goddamn awesome when they get there. I'm looking for music that fits that bill BUT under 8 minutes. I'm a middle school music teacher and my poor 6th graders just aren't at the point where they can concentrate for 12 minutes on an instrumental piece. And once you lose that focus, the climax isn't as interesting. If I could just find a good 5-6 minute Romantic-style epic piece...

Fid
Dec 2, 2010

'Bout time this town had
a new Sheriff


Morten Lauridsen really is one of the best

This piece made my morning

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHgPzvta4cE

Oromo
Jul 29, 2009



I really like contemporary atonal classical music, though finding good pieces requires digging through a pile of poo poo. So I really hope someone here can share his findings.
Here are some I've found that really achieve being perfectly original, something you've never heard before, and genius, but are also touching, something you can connect to and understand emotionally (an aspect most music of this type lacks).

Grisey - Partiels: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX77MC5oXDY
Berio - Sequenza nr. 7 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kf90X0CNxcI
Gubaidulina - Seven words: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g33S4XQ7qWs

Dr. Witherbone posted:

Ah, good, a classical thread! I was hoping one of these would turn up.

So, who's down for a little bit of baroque silliness with good old Handel? I'm going to ignore Water Music, just because everybody knows it.

Zadok The Priest is pretty great if you ask me. Take a listen:
http://listen.grooveshark.com/s/Zad...st/1eVRSY?src=5

While we're with Handel, have some Gloria In Excelsis Deo Trump, one of my personal favorites: http://listen.grooveshark.com/s/Glo...rump/TzMP?src=5

Any other Handel fans out there? This is barely scratching the surface of his works.

Handel is really amazing. His Fireworks music is really what set my passion for classical music aflame, though I must admit I never delved into his music, so your links were most interesting. The only "non-mainstream" Handel piece I know that is great is his Dixit Dominus, a piece he wrote only 21 years old, studying in Italy. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axW9...feature=related

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CowOnCrack
Sep 26, 2004

Cocaine bitches.

My personal all time favorite:

Busoni Piano Concerto - Marc Andre-Hamelin and the Lahti Symphony Orchestra

Mvt 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rFV_g6T5lM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhn7...feature=related
Mvt 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXl7...feature=related
Mvt 3:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RIi...feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqGw...feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5Jn...feature=related
Mvt 4:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zEZ...feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7DD...feature=related
Mvt 5:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_q9y...feature=related

Dozens of people dedicating their lives to their art and then coming together for one special moment. It makes me so sad that it is going, and will be soon be gone forever.

This concerto feels over the top but not over the top at the same time - because it is so beautiful I am so happy Busoni decided to go ahead and do whatever the hell he was trying to do here.

edit: still like 5000 views, god damnit. Tell your friends to watch it because it's probably a leading contender for the most difficult piano piece that can actually be played without major flaws by humans. What better way to entrap some new classical fans than showing Hamelin's blurred hands playing apreggios and 5-note chords faster than most popular musicians can play sixteenth notes

CowOnCrack fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2011 around 03:56

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