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Money Bags
Jun 27, 2013

I've got mouth to feed

Aging Millenial posted:

What do you guys think of Mahler?

Give him a patient chance and you will be rewarded for your efforts. I started with his 5th symphony which is the best imo. I had to listen to it a few times to get used to it though I was soon hooked. The 4th is my favorite though.

Mahler's excessive and over the top style can be off putting at first, but it's the logical conclusion of trends in western classical music that started long before him with composers like Bach, Mozart and Beethoven.

Listen to his 9th symphony. The scherzo in particular is

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Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

Kindertotenlieder is a haunting piece of music by Mahler... Would recommend

Mahler
Oct 30, 2008

He does the crossword every day.

Fave movement is tough, but I really like the first movements of the 7th and 9th symphonies. First and last parts of Das Lied Von der Erde. Seeing Resurrection tomorrow with the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra and preparing with this excellent version conducted by Abbado: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MPuoOj5TIw

Kytrarewn
Jul 15, 2011

Solving mysteries in
Bb, F and D.


I really like the first movement of Mahler 6, myself.

And then, of course, the third movement of Mahler 1.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Not to interrupt Mahler-chat, but I listened to Camille Saint-Saësans Symphony No. 3 in Minor C for the first time today, and holy poo poo.

I've only tried the Kansas City Symphony on Spotify because they don't have any Chicaco Symphony performances, which has been touted as the best to me.

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.


Franchescanado posted:

Not to interrupt Mahler-chat, but I listened to Camille Saint-Saësans Symphony No. 3 in Minor C for the first time today, and holy poo poo.

I've only tried the Kansas City Symphony on Spotify because they don't have any Chicaco Symphony performances, which has been touted as the best to me.

*Brass fanfare drowns out your post, ending with a low, sustained E minor by the Tubas.*


Mederlock posted:

Kindertotenlieder is a haunting piece of music by Mahler... Would recommend

Once I had kids I never played that piece again. Call me superstitious ~Frank Sinatra~

Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

By the way here's an excellent recording of the Totenlieder song cycle with orchestra https://open.spotify.com/user/meder...AAU6eB1FxZm385z . I would highly recommend checking out the lyrics as you listen

cebrail
May 9, 2014



Franchescanado posted:

Not to interrupt Mahler-chat, but I listened to Camille Saint-Saësans Symphony No. 3 in Minor C for the first time today, and holy poo poo.

I've only tried the Kansas City Symphony on Spotify because they don't have any Chicaco Symphony performances, which has been touted as the best to me.

They do though? The Barenboim/Litaize/CSO version is on spotify. Or is it a region thing?
https://open.spotify.com/album/13scX9tl2O6rBShU2KOMhx

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


cebrail posted:

They do though? The Barenboim/Litaize/CSO version is on spotify. Or is it a region thing?
https://open.spotify.com/album/13scX9tl2O6rBShU2KOMhx

I swear, nothing I searched gave me this result. Thank you.

cebrail
May 9, 2014



Probably due to their tags being utterly useless for classical music. I usually pick what I want to listen to elsewhere and then search for conductor and composer on Spotify, e.g. "Barenboim Saint-Saëns" in this case.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Any notable performances of Má Vlast by Smetana on Spotify?

Money Bags
Jun 27, 2013

I've got mouth to feed

Here's some Parsifal for your Good Friday courtesy of Franz Liszt. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y-xxhBia0s (Wagner/Liszt - Feierlicher Marsch zum heiligen Graal aus "Parsifal", S.450 1/2)

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Can anyone recommend any good Tone Poems? I'm already pretty familiar with Gershwin.

Kytrarewn
Jul 15, 2011

Solving mysteries in
Bb, F and D.


Strauss is the usual tone poem suggestion. Death & Transfiguration, in particular.

krampster2
Jun 26, 2014



Just had the pleasure of watching the second ever performance of Philip Glass's 11th symphony (after it's debut at Carnegie Hall). Queensland Symphony Orchestra did a good job and the piece was pretty great. It was really visual and sounded like it would accompany an adventure film well. The piece would start with a melody and then build on it, changing slightly with each repetition until it had become quite different, then it would quickly move on to something else and build on that and then bring it all together at the end of a movement.

Hope it gets recorded soon so I can listen to it again!

E: Oh and they also played the crowd favourite, Rachmaninoff's 2nd piano concerto. The 15 year old Russian protégé Alexander Malofeev was very expressive for a young pianist.

krampster2 fucked around with this message at Apr 22, 2017 around 13:32

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010

Actually, Lucy, my trouble is football. I just don't understand it. Instead of feeling happy, I feel sort of let down.

Go Lions.


Fun Shoe

Forgot to mention that we picked up another piece for our concert in June: Peer Gynt Suite No. 1 by Edvard Grieg, AKA the piece you've heard excerpts from a hundred times but never knew the name-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyM2AnA96yE

This might've been the first classical piece I ever heard. Certainly the first one I have clear memory of hearing in music class all the way back in 1st grade(!)

E: Our full rep for this concert, if you need stuff to listen to-

C-Euro posted:

Symphony No. 8 "Unfinished"- Schubert
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWnKMzAedK4

Hebrides Overture (Fingal's Cave)- Mendelssohn
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcogD-hHEYs

Radzetsky Marsch- J. Strauss Sr.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eab_eFtTKFs

C-Euro fucked around with this message at Apr 25, 2017 around 03:09

Doctor Malaver
May 23, 2007
The day before that I was wed - she went upstairs and she cut her head away. I' amazed!

Beethoven's 6th, 7th and 9th playing in my town in the next month! I plan to see all three. The 7th is played by a chamber orchestra but hopefully they will be as powerful as a symphonic orchestra.

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010

Actually, Lucy, my trouble is football. I just don't understand it. Instead of feeling happy, I feel sort of let down.

Go Lions.


Fun Shoe

Fellow brass players- any advice on the best way to clean out your slides at home? The tuning slides on my horn look a little gunky so I want to give them a really good cleaning but I'm worried about damaging the pipes by exposing them to the wrong chemical(s).

Kytrarewn
Jul 15, 2011

Solving mysteries in
Bb, F and D.


Just use valve oil and a snake for now. Your tech can use muriatic acid or some other lime-dissolving chemical (I can't remember the acronym for the stuff my guy used) but I wouldn't touch it for myself.

Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

Simple Green or just regular dish soap is perfect for cleaning out a horn, with a snake with a rubber tip. I do this all the time. Just make sure to let the slides dry out, then put a few drops of oil down the lead pipe, hold down the valves and blow the oil through, then work valves while blowing. That'll help coat them a bit, and may help with valve smoothness too.

By the way, when you wash the slides, you should wash the valves too. They pick up deposits too, and scrub in soapy water with a bristle brush can do wonders for keeping them smooth and clean. Just make sure to not get the felts wet, or take them off before you do the wash.

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



C-Euro posted:

Fellow brass players- any advice on the best way to clean out your slides at home? The tuning slides on my horn look a little gunky so I want to give them a really good cleaning but I'm worried about damaging the pipes by exposing them to the wrong chemical(s).

*snickering* Hey everyone! This guy's got gunk on his horn!

Cobaltshift
Jul 15, 2013


For your tuning slides you can submerge them in Luke warm water in a bathtub and run the snake through them in there. That's actually what I'm doing with my entire tenor trombone tonight.

david crosby
Mar 2, 2007



This is cool: Nikita Koshkin - Prelude and Fugue in a Minor

It's from a series of 24 preludes and fugues for the guitar (!)

Sibboleth
Jul 10, 2014


Franchescanado posted:

Can anyone recommend any good Tone Poems? I'm already pretty familiar with Gershwin.

Tapiola (Sibelius)

Sibboleth
Jul 10, 2014


Aging Millenial posted:

What do you guys think of Mahler?

On his deathbed Jascha Horenstein (who was always good for a quote) said that "the saddest thing about leaving this earth is never to hear Das Lied von der Erde again" and if you can get yourself really deep into Mahler that isn't that much of an exaggeration...

Money Bags
Jun 27, 2013

I've got mouth to feed

I attended a Jewish food and cultural festival in my city today and they had a klezmer band playing. Gave me a strong hankering for Mahler's first.

Sibboleth
Jul 10, 2014


Listening to Peter Grimes and struck at quite how perfect the combination of words and music is when Balstrode sings that "Grimes is weatherwise and skilled in the practice of his trade..."

david crosby
Mar 2, 2007



I've been listening to a lot of Sibelius lately, I don't think his 3rd symphony gets the recognition it deserves. I think it's really catchy basically all the way through, which is rare, IMO. Here's a youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2Qq-8rI34Q

ol yeller
Feb 20, 2015



its the 106th anniversary of mahlers death so im going to listen to all his symphonies. thank you

Money Bags
Jun 27, 2013

I've got mouth to feed

Going to see The Barber of Seville with my dear old mom this evening and I'm pretty stoked.


ol yeller posted:

its the 106th anniversary of mahlers death so im going to listen to all his symphonies. thank you

Right on.

Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!


I'm looking for some classical recommendations (shocking, I know), I really want to expand my literacy of classical music, but I find a lot of it is a little to airy and polite for me (I've already written off Mozart completely for this reason (I know he was anything but polite but his music is so loving insipid)), my background has a lot of really heavy music and minor keys in it, I love swells and dramatic dynamics. Things I know I love are Vivaldi's Winter movement, Beethoven's fifth, large chunks of Carmina Burana, Toccata and Fugue in D. Basically I'm looking for the music that post-rock ripped off.

Hawkgirl
Jun 20, 2003

Jesus Died for Your Songs

Cymbal Monkey posted:

I'm looking for some classical recommendations (shocking, I know), I really want to expand my literacy of classical music, but I find a lot of it is a little to airy and polite for me (I've already written off Mozart completely for this reason (I know he was anything but polite but his music is so loving insipid)), my background has a lot of really heavy music and minor keys in it, I love swells and dramatic dynamics. Things I know I love are Vivaldi's Winter movement, Beethoven's fifth, large chunks of Carmina Burana, Toccata and Fugue in D. Basically I'm looking for the music that post-rock ripped off.

You want the Romantic period. Like, probably basically anyone in the Romantic period. See if you like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITTbY1n3Iz8

edit: Also, before you totally count out Mozart, try listening to Lacrimosa, it might be your thing.

Hawkgirl fucked around with this message at May 21, 2017 around 20:22

Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

Hawkgirl posted:

You want the Romantic period. Like, probably basically anyone in the Romantic period. See if you like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITTbY1n3Iz8

edit: Also, before you totally count out Mozart, try listening to Lacrimosa, it might be your thing.

Mozart's Symphony No. 40 and Symphony No. 25 (both in G minor) are good for some good sturm und drang as well. https://open.spotify.com/user/meder...CjK8PDj9cNIhP6o

As for other recommendations, I think I got something up your alley with Brahm's 1st Symphony, it's fuckin nice as heck. This is the Staatskapelle Dresden orchestra, conducted by Kurt Sanderling for RCA's classical navigator series. https://open.spotify.com/album/3CZ8EhRE4YI2N9EfOtWLZ0

Mederlock fucked around with this message at May 21, 2017 around 21:51

Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!


Hawkgirl posted:

You want the Romantic period. Like, probably basically anyone in the Romantic period. See if you like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITTbY1n3Iz8

edit: Also, before you totally count out Mozart, try listening to Lacrimosa, it might be your thing.

Sibelius was awesome for like 80% of it but I found the two thirds mark really hard to care about. Lacrimosa was great as well so thank you for that.

Hawkgirl
Jun 20, 2003

Jesus Died for Your Songs

Cymbal Monkey posted:

Sibelius was awesome for like 80% of it but I found the two thirds mark really hard to care about. Lacrimosa was great as well so thank you for that.

I really hate violin concertos in general but the first movement of the Sibelius is my jam, man. I think you'll probably hit that 80% figure for most symphonies in general; symphonic form calls for a change in mood in the 2nd or 3rd movements and if a piece is largely emotional and big that tends to mean it gets a little less expressive and emotional and a little more classical (classical like the time period that Mozart was around, not the whole genre). This is of course an oversimplification, but the Romantic Era was basically a rebellion against all the stuff that you don't like much in say, Mozart's music. Before the Romantic Era, it wasn't common to write formal music to elicit emotional reactions, per say. It was more about the technical beauty of the composition and the juxtaposition of creativity and adhering to strict musical forms. Things like that one Bach tocatta and Mozart's Lacrimosa are almost accidents in how much emotion they elicit, and modern performances tend to interpret them more romantically, much to the chagrin of my early music professors. In the Romantic Era and especially in the Modern Era, people started messing with the structure of music more, so you might like some modern stuff even more. Like maybe try Firebird Suite/Stravinsky next: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGnsqTDY9Tw

It's a slow burn (and don't turn up the volume too much at the beginning, fair warning), but oh man it's got one of the best finales in music, period. Anyhow, since you mentioned wanting to be more literate in classical music, I just thought I'd point out that you saying "I am a great fan of the (late) Romantic Era" is a pretty good shorthand for your tastes.

Money Bags
Jun 27, 2013

I've got mouth to feed

In an attempt to liven up this thread, here's Nino Rota's bassoon concerto.

https://youtu.be/xBU_EkKsCho

Mahler
Oct 30, 2008

He does the crossword every day.

I made a musical animation thing of a John Adams piece (Slonimsky's Earbox for Orchestra). It's midi audio quality and my mouse shows up a few times (lol) but gives you an idea of how he makes his big groovy ostinato. Colour coded by pitch.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyRY0WZ_THo

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XBenedict
May 23, 2006



Someone had posted a question a few months ago about streaming classical services. Naxos is too pricey, and Grammofy is too limited.

Today, I discovered, quite by accident, Primephonic. They have a huge catalogue. It seems to be well organized. The music is available as 16-bit FLAC.

Winner.

Edit: Also, you can buy the albums if you so desire.

XBenedict fucked around with this message at Jun 25, 2017 around 00:56

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