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zenguitarman
Apr 6, 2009

Come on, lemme see ya shake your tail feather


The March Hare posted:

Hi thread, I've been really enjoying Veljo Tormis for the past week or so after learning that he had passed earlier this year and wanting to get more of a feel for him. He did a lot of work from and or inspired by Finnish epics (I think he was Estonian though), but the songs I've been listening to so far all have a really great feel to them. Has been nice to listen to some contemporary (western) choral music that isn't explicitly in the Christian tradition and or corny as gently caress. Anyone else have maybe some slightly more fringe stuff they could share that is in a similar vein?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJMLIZjpKmw

This isn't really in a similar vein and I have no idea if this is up your alley, but this old dude is the poo poo and is still making music.

Epitaph For Moonlight - R. Murray Schafer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzUXzu7JYFc

Lots of cool tone clusters and his scores are awesome to look at.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOlxuXHWfHw

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Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


Just subscribed to the Met HD on demand service because I enjoy burning money, what are the unmissable opera classics?

cebrail
May 9, 2014



Out of all of them?

Mozart - The Magic Flute, Cosi fan tutte, The Marriage of Figaro
Puccini - La bohème
Verdi - La Traviata, Nabucco, Aida
Bizet - Carmen
Rossini - Il barbiere di siviglia
Beethoven - Fidelio
Wagner - Ring der Nibelungen

XBenedict
May 23, 2006



Magic Hate Ball posted:

Just subscribed to the Met HD on demand service because I enjoy burning money, what are the unmissable opera classics?

I'm also a money burner, and the Cav/Pag from last season is exquisite.

Also the Marriage of Figaro from the last year or two was also delightful.

Basically any of their productions are worth watching, but those two from the Met stand out to me.

cebrail posted:

Out of all of them?

Mozart - The Magic Flute, Cosi fan tutte, The Marriage of Figaro
Puccini - La bohème
Verdi - La Traviata, Nabucco, Aida
Bizet - Carmen
Rossini - Il barbiere di siviglia
Beethoven - Fidelio
Wagner - Ring der Nibelungen

Also this.

empty whippet box
Jun 9, 2004
A perfectly acceptable Southern gentleman


Magic Hate Ball posted:

Just subscribed to the Met HD on demand service because I enjoy burning money, what are the unmissable opera classics?

Gorge yourself on Puccini and Rossini to really get yourself in the mood, if you try to start with poo poo like Wagner you'll be like 'jesus christ is this actually going anywhere" and the answer is no, not really, hope you packed a lunch. Italian opera is ridiculously melodic and full of ear worms that'll stick with you for life. So is anything Mozart did. Bonus points to Mozart operas for having ridiculous bullshit in them like a character who hosed thousands of women who is a rather obvious Mozart mary-sue.

My personal favorite is Alban Berg's "Wozzeck" though, I think it is shamefully underperformed and under-listened to. Kinda depressing though, but that's opera for you, and also serial compositions in general.

No idea if the Met has done it, though.

Money Bags
Jun 27, 2013

100% DE AGAVE

Magic Hate Ball posted:

Just subscribed to the Met HD on demand service because I enjoy burning money, what are the unmissable opera classics?

I bought the Met's production of Wagner's Die Meistersinger on DVD and it's one of my most treasured possessions. Check it out if you have the time. It's almost five hours long so you might want to spread it out over a few days.

smug n stuff
Jul 21, 2016

The power of chops compels you!

Been listening to some Poulenc motets and I really like them.
I'm super unfamiliar with him though, what by him do y'all like?

James The 1st
Feb 23, 2013


A lot of his stuff is cool, I like his concertos.

Cobaltshift
Jul 15, 2013


smug n stuff posted:

Been listening to some Poulenc motets and I really like them.
I'm super unfamiliar with him though, what by him do y'all like?

His Sextet for Piano and Quintet is one of my favorite pieces. You can also check out his Trio for Horn, Trumpet and Trombone, it's a fun little piece and a historically significant piece of repertoire for brass.

empty whippet box
Jun 9, 2004
A perfectly acceptable Southern gentleman


smug n stuff posted:

Been listening to some Poulenc motets and I really like them.
I'm super unfamiliar with him though, what by him do y'all like?

Poulenc's clarinet sonata is great, I played it on one of my undergrad recital. I never get tired of playing that piece.

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.


empty whippet box posted:

Gorge yourself on Puccini and Rossini to really get yourself in the mood, if you try to start with poo poo like Wagner you'll be like 'jesus christ is this actually going anywhere" and the answer is no, not really, hope you packed a lunch. Italian opera is ridiculously melodic and full of ear worms that'll stick with you for life. So is anything Mozart did. Bonus points to Mozart operas for having ridiculous bullshit in them like a character who hosed thousands of women who is a rather obvious Mozart mary-sue.

My personal favorite is Alban Berg's "Wozzeck" though, I think it is shamefully underperformed and under-listened to. Kinda depressing though, but that's opera for you, and also serial compositions in general.

No idea if the Met has done it, though.

This is a great post.


:encore:

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


So far I've watched:

Eugene Onegin - I love Tchaikovsky and this did not fail to disappoint! I loved the mirror set, particularly during the duel sequence, and though I was left kinda cold by the "letter" sequence, the burning, organic poetry that foams up elsewhere is really stunning. The guy who played Onegin looked kinda like Walter Matthau and he was loving amazing.

La Cenerentola - omg I loved this! I had Rossini music in my head for days afterwards, I woke up hearing Rossini music. The production was a little heavy-handed (the big wedding cake is cool but tbh it just felt like a dark, empty room) but Joyce DiDonato was so impossibly endearing and wonderful, like an Italian Emily Watson. The Magritte flourishes were cool.

Hansel and Gretel - I loved this too. I'm a huge fan of folk-inspired music, and the set design was terrific, particularly in the forest sequence. I really want to see this again, and I'm now agonizingly sad that I missed the Seattle Opera's production of it. The melodies are so charming and beautiful.

La Traviata - I have to admit I found this to be kind of a snooze, but straightforward romances kind of lose me. I liked the set (the use of the huge clock was neat), and the music was pretty good, but something about it just didn't grab me.

I also watched part of Madama Butterfly but Kristina Opolais looks like the terrifying evil villain in a movie about children trying to save puppies so I put it on the backburner. I'm really looking forward to this season's production of The Exterminating Angel, which is one of my favorite movies and I like new opera (Breaking the Waves is amazing).

Sadly, there's no video of Wozzeck, which I was hoping for (Sondheim calls it his favorite opera) but they do have Lulu.

Money Bags
Jun 27, 2013

100% DE AGAVE

Mozart in the Jungle is good

Cobaltshift
Jul 15, 2013


Money Bags posted:

Mozart in the Jungle is good

My orchestra director/conducting teacher from my undergrad directs the orchestra used in the show (the Chelsea Symphony.) He is also a horn player in the show and had some fun stories from filming!

Money Bags
Jun 27, 2013

100% DE AGAVE

Cobaltshift posted:

My orchestra director/conducting teacher from my undergrad directs the orchestra used in the show (the Chelsea Symphony.) He is also a horn player in the show and had some fun stories from filming!

Do please share any stories. I'm having a huge amount of fun watching this show.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


Money Bags posted:

I bought the Met's production of Wagner's Die Meistersinger on DVD and it's one of my most treasured possessions. Check it out if you have the time. It's almost five hours long so you might want to spread it out over a few days.

I watched this like a miniseries and loved it! The characters and story move in a way that feels so contemporary, almost like a Bergman film that's blown up to zeppelin proportions. That burst of Hitlery nationalism at the end was a little startling but a) sort of expected and b) a fitting ending. One of the most intriguing things a story can portray is craft, and while that includes broader terminology (eg Kieslowski's "Blue" could be construed as depicting the craft of grief), it's also just fun and engaging to watch a story detail and inform you about an actual craft, or trade, or skill. It's why I like upstairs-downstairs stories, and backstage movies. The craft of the master singers was so well detailed and explicated, and I'm glad Wagner had the guts to spend so much of his five hours on the ins-and-outs of it. Beckmesser's humiliation reminded me of Frasier botching Buttons and Bows.

I also watched La Nozze Di Figaro, which I enjoyed but didn't love - the plot moves like a Swiss watch, which I appreciated, but the music didn't lift me. After that, I watched the other version of Madame Butterfly, which I had a similar reaction to. The music is terrific (the humming chorus is incredible) but the story felt too languid, and when the tragedy finally strikes it was too little too late. I think I was just kind of distracted by the yellowface casting and the slightly overbaked production - the black-on-black mirrors remind me of the bathroom in a fancy Japanese restaurant we used to go to when I was growing up, which was done entirely in glossy black, even the toilets. I enjoyed Patricia Racette well enough, she has a certain innocent motherly look, though I was still craving the true childishness that I imagine is required to make the role pop. At least she didn't look like a witch, though having to see the child puppet in so much detail via camera close-up was unsettling.

Since I can't do anything without overdoing it, I also watched Capriccio, which is apparently an opera for devoted opera buffs only but wow, I loved it! Again there was the concept of craft put to the forefront, and the debate was spirited, lively, and engaging. The production feels a little dusty, though - it's set in a 1920s villa, which I think I prefer to the 1700s setting suggested by the libretto, but it was premiered in the 90s and it really feels like it, lots of clashing muted colors. There were also moments of weird comedy that felt out of place. Most of the opera is really witty and kind of understated, which I liked, but the bits with the ballet dancers and the opera singers were done in a bizarre, broad style.

zenguitarman
Apr 6, 2009

Come on, lemme see ya shake your tail feather


Saw Britten's War Requiem performed tonight and the performance was sadly underwhelming... it just wasn't as visceral as it should have been, especially the tenor soloist and the choir. The baritone was world class though and the children's choir was great too. Oh well, it's a huge undertaking, so kudos to them. It just didn't grab me like I thought it would.

Also I never noticed how Britten quotes himself during the Abraham and Isaac bit. Goddamn Britten is good.

cebrail
May 9, 2014



Don't die, thread.

I've been on a Monteverdi binge today, here's a music video (yes, really) of Anna Prohaska singing Lamento della ninfa

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHRjvK9syQc

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The March Hare
Oct 15, 2006

Je rêve d'un
Wayne's World 3


Buglord

zenguitarman posted:

This isn't really in a similar vein and I have no idea if this is up your alley, but this old dude is the poo poo and is still making music.

Epitaph For Moonlight - R. Murray Schafer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzUXzu7JYFc

Lots of cool tone clusters and his scores are awesome to look at.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOlxuXHWfHw

Oop, hey, thanks for this - Schafer is great. The father of soundscapes! I've also been on a major Monteverdi kick, glad I'm not the only one.

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