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XBenedict
May 23, 2006

YOUR LIPS SAY 0, BUT YOUR EYES SAY 1.



Man Musk posted:

couldn't find the jazz megathread but u.s. classical music makes me want hang up on people without saying goodbye. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFyuOEovTOE#t=30s

Sadly, it died a quiet death: Jazz “Megathread”

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Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Like a month late here because I forgot about this thread, but despite a huge budget and pretty decent ticket sales and donations, the Met is pretty much always in mediocre to terrible financial shape, and (like every house in NYC) very heavily union and those union employees are expensive af. Obviously I'm sympathetic to the people laid off, but I think for the continued financial viability of the met it was probably the right decision, especially since most of their patrons are old/at risk, and whenever theaters are allowed to reopen (and I imagine they will be among the very last places) I would imagine a whole lot of their usual patrons don't show up.

A friend of mine works at the Goodman in Chicago and was telling me about their trials and tribulations, and I hadn't really processed the full impact of the 'rona on live theaters/the performing arts at all. They would love to stream past performances etc. to their season ticketholders and donors, but their agreement with Actor's Equity won't let them without paying royalties they can't really afford right now to the actors, who I am sure need them just as badly. They're trying to fund-raise with no season and 2 shows they've paid for but been unable to perform (and sell tickets too), no idea what/if their season is going to be next yr and oh yeah all their donors' stock portfolios just shrunk by 25%.

It's always hard times for performing arts organizations, but it's really hard times now, so throw them some dollars for making the world a more beautiful and bearable place if you can!

...and that concludes the spring pledge drive here on WVXY, your local public radio and classical music station.

Anyway, I'm listening to Beethoven's String Quartet no. 15 and it's one of my favorite pieces of music, and here is a really great and interesting Goldberg Variations by Sokolov that you can't gt a real damned recording of:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RWfJR31XwU#t=8s

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.




Was listening to the amazing Brahms Cello Sonatas by Jacqueline du Pre last night and this morning Dvorak's Cello Concerto, recalling what an amazing talent she was. And incidentally, coming up during the Beatles' heyday, and the golden age of Rock n Roll.
https://www.amazon.com/Jacqueline-D...ps%2C186&sr=1-1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvPza4XosW4

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






There is an incredible recording of her playing something by Haydn? IIRC and it is the prettiest/saddest cello music ever, but I can't remember what it is

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

There is an incredible recording of her playing something by Haydn? IIRC and it is the prettiest/saddest cello music ever, but I can't remember what it is

What you're thinking of may be Disc 3 of the set, I believe, one of these concertos-
Playlist:

[01] - Monn Conc in g Allegro.flac

[02] - Monn Conc in g Adagio.flac

[03] - Monn Conc in g Allegro non tanto.flac

[04] - Haydn Conc in D Allegro moderato.flac

[05] - Haydn Conc in D Adagio.flac

[06] - Haydn Conc in D Rondo Allegro.flac

[07] - Haydn Conc in C Moderato.flac

[08] - Haydn Conc in C Adagio.flac

[09] - Haydn Conc in C Allegro molto.flac

I'm listening to the Concerto in D now, I'd call it rather wistful. The one in C is more rambunctious. You know her life story was an epic tragedy, right?

Doc Fission
Sep 10, 2011



Fun Shoe

I don't have a background in music - can't even read sheet music - but piano compositions have really been comforting to me during quarantine. I've been listening to Rachmaninoff's piano sonatas a lot. Does anyone have any recommendation for piano compositions?

Background info would also be helpful. I don't even know where to start

Oromo
Jul 29, 2009



Brahms Intermezzos are very soothing and nice. Composed near the end of his life, they are some of the most intimate and mature music there is. Best recording IMO is by Glenn Gould, but there are many good ones.

Schumann is also really great. I recommend Fantasie Op. 17 (particularly the last movement). Composed upon Beethoven's death as a hommage to him, but dedicated to Liszt, it's a cornerstone piece for the romantic movement. Best recording is by Pollini, nobody else comes even close.

Man Musk
Jan 13, 2010



https://twitter.com/richardscheinin...4999045120?s=21

zenguitarman
Apr 6, 2009

Come on, lemme see ya shake your tail feather





I mean are we talking Bitches Brew Miles or Someday My Prince Will Come Miles? Also what era Beethoven, because I'd think they get down with the presto from op 131. Seeing a lot of holes in this study.

OneSizeFitsAll
Sep 13, 2010

Du bist mein Sofa


Doc Fission posted:

I don't have a background in music - can't even read sheet music - but piano compositions have really been comforting to me during quarantine. I've been listening to Rachmaninoff's piano sonatas a lot. Does anyone have any recommendation for piano compositions?

Background info would also be helpful. I don't even know where to start

Piano has possibly the broadest repertoire of any solo instrument, so there's a huge and diverse range of stuff out there, depending on what you like stylistically. The cornerstones are often considered to be Bach's Well Tempered Clavier and Beethoven's 32 sonatas. The WTC consists of 48 preludes and fuges. They're very much rooted in the baroque style, but each set of 24 has a prelude in fugue in each major and minor key and the works as a whole cover a huge amount of musical ground within those forms.

Beethoven's sonatas showcase his development from the composing purely in the Classical style to the more bombastic, technical middle period stuff which influenced the begininng of Romantic era, to his late era stuff which is no less technical than the middle period but also has more moments of introspection and is probably his most sophisticated era (you can see the same development with some of his other compositions, notably his string quartets ((which are HIGHLY recommended))). Some of my favourites of his 32 are No 21 (Waldstein), No 23 (Appassionata) and the late ones (No 28 onwards), but they are all superb, in truth, and cover so much ground; one of things which makes Beethoven so magnificent is the range of emotions - he can cover the entire human condition in a single work, with stunning articulacy.

Beyond that, most pianists/fans of piano music (myself included) love Chopin. He composed some of the most exquisitely beautiful piano music in history, but his work also veers into heavier and more tempestuous areas at times. I'd particularly recommend looking at his nocturnes and ballades, but again there's gold everywhere you look.

For other romantic repertoire I would also recommend taking a look at Brahms - really any of it, but off the top of my head I'd suggest the intermezzos and rhapsodies.

As you like Rachmaninoff, I'd also recommend looking at his preludes. I learned his Prelude in D major, Op. 23 No. 4 a while back and it's ridiculously beautiful.

There's plenty more one could recommend (Schubert, Schumann, Liszt and many more), but what I've suggested already covers a huge amount of ground, so maybe dip in and see what you like.

Personally, if I could choose just one composer's piano repertoire to take to a desert island it would be Beethoven's.

80k
Jul 3, 2004

careful!

Doc Fission posted:

I don't have a background in music - can't even read sheet music - but piano compositions have really been comforting to me during quarantine. I've been listening to Rachmaninoff's piano sonatas a lot. Does anyone have any recommendation for piano compositions?

Background info would also be helpful. I don't even know where to start

Solo Piano music is my favorite classical music to listen to.

If you like Rachmaninoff's piano sonatas, definitely try his piano concertos 2 & 3. Also, try Shostakovich's 24 Preludes and Fugues for more good Russian modern music. Look for a good recording of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition (the original solo Piano, not the orchestral rearrangement)... I can recommend Mikhail Pletnev's and Sviatoslav Richter's Sofia Recital.

For Romantic and other later period stuff, I love Ravel's piano works. Generally 2 CD's worth will cover the repertoire, and plenty of pianists have done great recordings. I particularly like Casadesus and Bavouzet.

And Chopin, of course, is a must-listen. Try his Nocturnes, Preludes, Etudes, Polonaises.

For Baroque, try Bach. His French Suites, English Suites, 6 Partitas, Well Tempered Clavier, Inventions & Sinfonias are all awesome. Glenn Gould's recordings are a great place to start.

For Classical period, I absolutely love Mozart's Piano Sonatas. So many of them will be familiar to you already. As a whole, they are probably the piano music I listen to the most. Lots of great entire cycles to choose from, though my current favorite set is Alicia De Larrocha's. Mozart has a lot of wonderful Piano Concertos too.

Beethoven's Piano Sonatas, too:
  • Try Pletnev's recording of the Waldstein, Apassionata, and Moonlight on a single disc.
  • Pollini's Late Piano Sonatas (a 2CD set) is amazing, and includes Beethoven's last 5 sonatas.
  • Youra Guller's No. 31 is one of my favorites.
  • For complete cycles, so many to choose from... the classic recordings (Brendel, Arrau, Fischer) are great, as are some of the more modern recordings (I love Jumppanen's set)

Brahms' Piano Sonatas are great. My absolute favorite Brahms' work is actually his Sonatas for Piano and Violin. Breaks the "solo piano" theme, but as a pianist myself, I appreciate these piano pieces just as much as anything.

Schubert has some great piano sonatas, but I tend to appreciate his piano music when accompanied with his Lieder songs (Die Schone Mullerin, Winterreise), if you enjoy some German classical vocal work. My favorite solo piano Schubert are in the Sviatoslav Richter collections (which also includes amazing Chopin, Lizst, Beethoven, Mussorgsky, and more).

These are some of the ones that come immediate to mind.

OneSizeFitsAll
Sep 13, 2010

Du bist mein Sofa


80k posted:


For Classical period, I absolutely love Mozart's Piano Sonatas. So many of them will be familiar to you already. As a whole, they are probably the piano music I listen to the most. Lots of great entire cycles to choose from, though my current favorite set is Alicia De Larrocha's. Mozart has a lot of wonderful Piano Concertos too.

K310 in A minor is my favourite. And one of only two minor key sonatas he wrote!

quote:

[*]Pollini's Late Piano Sonatas (a 2CD set) is amazing, and includes Beethoven's last 5 sonatas.

This is indeed great. I have it complement/complete the wonderful Gilels *almost* complete set, which has a lot of my favourite renditions. I love Richter for Beethoven too, though there are unsurprisingly a lot of wonderful interpreters of Beethoven's 32 sonatas.

80k
Jul 3, 2004

careful!

OneSizeFitsAll posted:

This is indeed great. I have it complement/complete the wonderful Gilels *almost* complete set, which has a lot of my favourite renditions. I love Richter for Beethoven too, though there are unsurprisingly a lot of wonderful interpreters of Beethoven's 32 sonatas.

Richter is my favorite for Beethoven, as well. His recordings are so scattered throughout different collections, and often out of print, that it's hard to recommend them. My favorite of his is the late Beethoven sonatas he did in the Historic Russian Archives - Sviatoslav Richter in Concert 5CD set. Out of print now, and I know those recordings are available elsewhere. I just can't get enough of those last few sonatas he did... I always go back to Richter, Pollini, and the Guller.

The Youra Guller recording is available on Youtube. The CD, coupled with No. 32 is worth hunting down.

80k fucked around with this message at 00:32 on May 23, 2020

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Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

80k posted:

Richter is my favorite for Beethoven, as well. His recordings are so scattered throughout different collections, and often out of print, that it's hard to recommend them. My favorite of his is the late Beethoven sonatas he did in the Historic Russian Archives - Sviatoslav Richter in Concert 5CD set. Out of print now, and I know those recordings are available elsewhere. I just can't get enough of those last few sonatas he did... I always go back to Richter, Pollini, and the Guller.

The Youra Guller recording is available on Youtube. The CD, coupled with No. 32 is worth hunting down.

Oh my lanta. That Guller recording is sublime!

Oh, as for bombastic piano works, I have to recommend Cecile Ousset's rendition of the Edvard Grieg's Piano Concerto No.1 with the LSO and Sir Neville Marriner. It's incredible https://open.spotify.com/album/7wRr...aR9actUoquKClEw . A search for it on youtube will bring up the individual movements too if Spotify isn't your thing.

Mederlock fucked around with this message at 15:13 on May 23, 2020

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