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80k
Jul 3, 2004

careful!

algebra testes posted:

Piano Sonatas. I'm digging Schubert and Beethoven.

What else do people like?

Brahms' is usually known for his other piano works, but he has 3 excellent piano sonatas. I like his sonatas for piano and violin even more.

Rachmaninoff's piano sonatas are incredible... plenty of great recordings out there.

Mozart's are among my favorites. I own more complete collections of Mozart's piano sonatas than anyone else.

Prokofiev also has some awesome piano sonatas. His 6/7/8 are referred to as his war sonatas and are all excellent.

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Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



algebra testes posted:

Piano Sonatas. I'm digging Schubert and Beethoven.

What else do people like?

Haydn for that general period.

For fun, try the Ives "Concord" sonata.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




I accidently spent all afternoon with the Haydn trumpet concerto in E- flat on in the background and it was wonderful. I listen to NPR classical like Performance Today alot and I can occasionally get into more modern or romantic stuff, but really the 18th C. is my jam.

I love Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and to a lesser extent Bach and Beethoven, but I really haven't listened to a ton besides them, and even within their work my knowledge is definitely not broad-mostly operas, symphonies and string quartets and quintets. What else should I check out? I've listened to a bit some Italians of the same period-Locatelli, Scarlatti and Veracini I think, and I think I've really liked stuff by one of Bach's sons but I can't remember which.

Is there a good Great Courses or youtube or something on audible that's like a music history/appreciation/theory book/class/lecture I should know about, preferably with bits of the music in it? Like what makes Bach sound like Bach and Baroque and what makes Mozart sound like Mozart? It would be neat to understand why I like XYZ music so much.

The March Hare
Oct 15, 2006

Je rêve d'un
Wayne's World 3


Buglord

Popping in to share a couple of youtube accounts. Ever since john11inch (I know) got his account shut down I've been looking more and more for prolific uploaders to do music discovery with.

--
Ran across this account while looking for some Ifukube stuff:
https://www.youtube.com/user/kukikei/videos

It is more or less entirely Japanese classical, some really good/interesting stuff I hadn't ever heard of.

--
I listen to a lot of eastern-Euro choral stuff and this guy has an unbelievable amount of very good recordings for tons of it (and also lots of other mostly choral music).
https://www.youtube.com/user/VitaliyGR/videos

--
This account is also good for (I think exclusively?) eastern orthodox choral stuff, but I don't speak Russian so I have no idea if there is any secular music in here.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJf0VJStxY9HmgFANMr_0pQ/videos


What I would like to find is either john11inch's new account (provided he has one) or a similarly scoped account for borderline unlistenable contemporary classical.

Would also accept links to prolific Balkan or Persian Gulf uploaders. I've been looking for more بحري stuff like https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3S_G6xlrEWU but searching "nautical music" in arabic seems to return a lot of lovely live recordings and I've yet to find a channel that is a repository of good recordings (even good field recordings would be nice).

So if anyone knows where I could get my fix for any of the above, or has links to other good channels to click around, please let me know :)

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I accidently spent all afternoon with the Haydn trumpet concerto in E- flat on in the background and it was wonderful. I listen to NPR classical like Performance Today alot and I can occasionally get into more modern or romantic stuff, but really the 18th C. is my jam.

I love Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and to a lesser extent Bach and Beethoven, but I really haven't listened to a ton besides them, and even within their work my knowledge is definitely not broad-mostly operas, symphonies and string quartets and quintets. What else should I check out? I've listened to a bit some Italians of the same period-Locatelli, Scarlatti and Veracini I think, and I think I've really liked stuff by one of Bach's sons but I can't remember which.

Is there a good Great Courses or youtube or something on audible that's like a music history/appreciation/theory book/class/lecture I should know about, preferably with bits of the music in it? Like what makes Bach sound like Bach and Baroque and what makes Mozart sound like Mozart? It would be neat to understand why I like XYZ music so much.

Seeing you mention it made me wonder too, so I went and found this: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-great-composers-podcast-a-classical-music-podcast/id1125785164
The guy's delivery is not great, very much music history TA vibes, but I'm two episodes in and enjoying it so far.

Wrt, what makes Bach sound like Bach (et al), you might like Nahre Sol's youtube channel?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPvAqyDd1aI

Oh also, on the off chance you're interested in more complex analysis of orchestral stuff I really like this guy's channel:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBB9UDpLfIA

Stringent fucked around with this message at 02:59 on May 19, 2021

Siivola
Dec 23, 2012



Robert Greenberg has a bunch of Great Courses on classical music. I really enjoyed his How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, 3rd Edition, it’s available on audible.

Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

Siivola posted:

Robert Greenberg has a bunch of Great Courses on classical music. I really enjoyed his How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, 3rd Edition, it’s available on audible.

Can confirm that this is an amazing program

Health Services
Feb 27, 2009


I'll throw in a recommendation for Gould's album, "A Consort of Musicke Bye William Byrde and Orlando Gibbons.

Separately, there's a lot of really good recorder music out there. Vivaldi concertos are always spectacular, and there's a very good baroque repertoire from Handel, Corelli, Sammartini, Telemann, Quantz, and others.

Dan Laurin is one of the best players in the world, here he's playing Marais's theme and variations on the Spanish Follies. It was a popular piece centuries ago and many composers have written their own versions, for pretty much every instrument and combination of instruments out there. Laurin's playing a voice flute, which is a recorder keyed in D, sitting between an alto and tenor in range.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=no4bWpbRBKs

Health Services fucked around with this message at 15:12 on May 21, 2021

XBenedict
May 23, 2006

YOUR LIPS SAY 0, BUT YOUR EYES SAY 1.



Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I accidently spent all afternoon with the Haydn trumpet concerto in E- flat on in the background and it was wonderful. I listen to NPR classical like Performance Today alot and I can occasionally get into more modern or romantic stuff, but really the 18th C. is my jam.

I love Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and to a lesser extent Bach and Beethoven, but I really haven't listened to a ton besides them, and even within their work my knowledge is definitely not broad-mostly operas, symphonies and string quartets and quintets. What else should I check out? I've listened to a bit some Italians of the same period-Locatelli, Scarlatti and Veracini I think, and I think I've really liked stuff by one of Bach's sons but I can't remember which.

Is there a good Great Courses or youtube or something on audible that's like a music history/appreciation/theory book/class/lecture I should know about, preferably with bits of the music in it? Like what makes Bach sound like Bach and Baroque and what makes Mozart sound like Mozart? It would be neat to understand why I like XYZ music so much.

You should definitely add Classical Classroom to your podcast rotation.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Thanks for all the great recommendations-I'm checking a bunch of them out!

I also found a 180hr long, complete works of Mozart playlist on spotify and that's been my jam lately, lol.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Why does spotify make trying to find classical music so difficult? Is there a better streaming thing for classical? It has lots of great recordings but makes them impossible to find because it doesn't distinguish between composer and performer

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Why does spotify make trying to find classical music so difficult? Is there a better streaming thing for classical? It has lots of great recordings but makes them impossible to find because it doesn't distinguish between composer and performer

i've not actually tried this, but it was getting promoted a while back, might be worth a shot?

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/idagio-classical-music/id1014917700

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



The main problem Spotify has is being unable to search by record label. I believe the dedicated classical streaming services have that, but usually I can find things reasonably easily with both the performer/conductor and composer in a search.

Primephonic is the "dedicated" one that gets a lot of press - it advertises its search feature on the website.

https://www.primephonic.com/


e) lol Primephonic doesn't let you search by record label either. Incredible.

Siivola
Dec 23, 2012



Spotify's syntax for label searches is label:"label name here". For example, label:naxos or label:"blue note".

Siivola fucked around with this message at 16:54 on Jul 7, 2021

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



that is extremely good to know, Primephonic doesn't give me a standard advanced search thingy so "Naxos Ives" was popping up with a bunch of recordings of Ariadne auf Naxos before a single Charles Ives Naxos disc.

XBenedict
May 23, 2006

YOUR LIPS SAY 0, BUT YOUR EYES SAY 1.



Feels Villeneuve posted:

The main problem Spotify has is being unable to search by record label. I believe the dedicated classical streaming services have that, but usually I can find things reasonably easily with both the performer/conductor and composer in a search.

Primephonic is the "dedicated" one that gets a lot of press - it advertises its search feature on the website.

https://www.primephonic.com/


e) lol Primephonic doesn't let you search by record label either. Incredible.

Neither does Idagio , but I like the app a lot better than Primephonic.

Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


XBenedict posted:

You should definitely add Classical Classroom to your podcast rotation.

I didn't come in here looking to have yet another podcast to be eternally behind on, but here I am. Listened to the first few episodes on my commute last week and it's good. Local to me, too, which caught me by surprise (although I understand the host has relocated to Seattle in the intervening years).

Peggotty
May 9, 2014



Idagio is so much better than Spotify for finding classical music, it's like Spotify isn't even trying (because it isn't). However, I feel like Idagio is still not good enough. When I tried it out, I still felt like manually finding a recording via google and then looking for that specific recording on my streaming app was the way to go.

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



XBenedict posted:

Neither does Idagio , but I like the app a lot better than Primephonic.

why do they do that, god


am I the weird one here? Like I usually can't be bothered to remember a specific year of release or recording, when it's an artist who's recorded the same work multiple times it's usually "Bernstein's DG recording of Mahler 4" or something.

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



anyway i've been on a small Rzewski kick since he died a few weeks back. this one is fun, other than The People United... (which is close to a repertoire piece these days) Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues gets played sometimes as an encore- his North American Ballads are all great, though this one is the most famous by a good margin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYT_XmJKp_o

though if you haven't heard The People United Will Never Be Defeated! you really should


(if you want a recording it's a really common coupling to discs of The People United Will Never Be Defeated! - Rzewski's own recording on North American Ballads and Squares is also great, and on streaming)

Feels Villeneuve fucked around with this message at 15:05 on Jul 12, 2021

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



sorry to gush about Rzewski again but Down By The Riverside from his North American Ballads is also amazing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hE7sdiZe6UM

I dunno if it's at all practical to get the physical CD nowadays but really, really love this entire disc

https://www.amazon.com/American-Ballads-Squares-Frederic-Rzewski/dp/B013I9UF90

and wrt "The People United..." - like a lot of 20th century stuff it's really, really good to follow along with the score

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvestPHTuWc

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



crossposting - but since it's related to Rzewski, anyone have any favorites when it comes to (post)modernist pianist-composers from the 20th/21st century? Really want more stuff in that vein- especially his mixing of atonal "tropes" into tonal music in a way that doesn't come across as a gimmick.



also i am really sorry for the quad-post, lmao

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA



Does opera go in here? Not sure, but holy CANNOLI I was looking up a singer and found this recording on youtube and that might be one of the best baritones I've ever heard:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eX0bQsW0uA

It is criminal that such voices were active before we could get really hi-def recording equipment

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





StrixNebulosa posted:

Does opera go in here? Not sure, but holy CANNOLI I was looking up a singer and found this recording on youtube and that might be one of the best baritones I've ever heard:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eX0bQsW0uA

It is criminal that such voices were active before we could get really hi-def recording equipment

I'm not a big opera knower, but I feel like an idiot now never having heard this guy before. Holy cannoli is right.

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



yeah i like chamber music

https://youtu.be/9UoJMB5_sGY

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



been streaming this - this is my favorite Mahler set, though the Leonard Bernstein ones are both classic in their own way. Gielen is really good at bringing out the dark, bleakest aspects of Mahler.

book
Nov 29, 2014


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsbA5KDChZw

Always been a fan of Vengerov's master classes. A lot of insightful commentary, and you can really hear the difference between a world-class violinist like Maxim, and a "regular" professional like Brett.

Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

book posted:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsbA5KDChZw

Always been a fan of Vengerov's master classes. A lot of insightful commentary, and you can really hear the difference between a world-class violinist like Maxim, and a "regular" professional like Brett.

I'm a huuuuge fan of his concerto performance off this album, they are jaw-droppingly good. https://open.spotify.com/album/1V7zFNRL3sJLmTpzEHA3NV?si=rCmi2ETSTJmw35diGhyDdg&utm_source=copy-link&dl_branch=1

landgrabber
Sep 12, 2015



does this thread cover operas?

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



yup, go for it, it could use the activity

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





Feels Villeneuve posted:

been streaming this - this is my favorite Mahler set, though the Leonard Bernstein ones are both classic in their own way. Gielen is really good at bringing out the dark, bleakest aspects of Mahler.



Not a fan of Bernstein. I thought his version was lightweight, which Mahler definitely isn't. Much prefer Chailly, even Gilbert Kaplan lol.

Feels Villeneuve
Oct 7, 2007

Kanye West - Touch the Sky



The hammers in Gielen's 6th knocked poo poo off the top of my speakers lol

80k
Jul 3, 2004

careful!

Feels Villeneuve posted:

The hammers in Gielen's 6th knocked poo poo off the top of my speakers lol

Gielen's Mahler is awesome. The first movement of the 3rd might be the best I've ever heard (though, the remaining movements are not my favorite). Chailly's cycle might be my overall favorite.

Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

I'm a huge fan of Mariss Jansons's take of the 6th with the LSO https://open.spotify.com/album/4YbXWJkll5hAhN9Rzk3eKl?si=30CkpH9ZQeuqnqK5nEKYuw&utm_source=copy-link&dl_branch=1

landgrabber
Sep 12, 2015



i'm kinda just wondering how i should listen to opera to begin with.

should i look up translated words to it all and read it along with the music? should i watch recordings? how do i know what a good recording of one is?

kind of a similar thing with swan lake, though i've gotten into it more since i know the plot outline and the music itself is just so good. but figure i'm missing something.

swan lake bangs btw. operawise right now i want to check out tosca and the valkyrie

webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005



landgrabber posted:

i'm kinda just wondering how i should listen to opera to begin with.

Opera is as visual a medium as it is musical. Find a video recording of whatever seems interesting, read a concise plot synopsis first, pour a glass of wine, and enjoy the show.

Tosca is a great one to start with. Walküre is more of an undertaking if you don't like Wagner already. I like to recommend Tannhäuser, which is a bit shorter than Walküre, and has more bangers.

DaWolfey
Oct 24, 2003



College Slice

Ah yes, Opera - only enjoyable if you already know the story, have a translation of the words to hand, and are drunk

webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005



if you've read a synopsis and the singers are good, translations are unnecessary. Wine is good for watching a facsimile at home, but really the medium is Live Theater. I don't know anyone who watches archival recordings of plays in their free time

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




I just listen to all the pretty music and don’t really care about the plot. Mozart’s operas all have very nice music to listen to and are very accessible-the plots are mostly pretty silly anyway. Find a recording that cuts out all the spoken parts and just has the real music parts if that’s what you want to do.

Most visual recordings of performances have subtitles, and live performances sometimes even have a translation projected in English somewhere.

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Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it

Grimey Drawer

Yeah, it's a lot like musicals. A lot of people just love the music and only listen to the soundtracks/albums, but it's widely recognized that to actually experience it fully you've gotta be there at the live theater production. I /liked/ The Phantom of the Opera when I had just heard some of the songs, but it wasn't till it came to my local city and I saw the entire 2 story stage rotating with the lights, music, fog, everything while the Phantom led Christine to his lair that I actually understood the appeal. It was cool as gently caress. It was the same thing with the first opera I went to, Turandot. Most people would know a few arias from it, mainly Nessun Dorma, but it was the production, setting, Live subtitles/translation above the stage, the performance from the singers/chorus, and the music combined that turned it into a very compelling evening.

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