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OneSizeFitsAll
Sep 13, 2010

Du bist mein Sofa

The Wiggly Wizard posted:

Not sure how I feel about hearing ragtime on what I assume is a 9 foot Steinway

Happens whenever someone performs the 2nd movement of Beethoven's 32nd piano sonata. :dance:

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webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005
2023 Classical Music Grammy nominees:




zenguitarman
Apr 6, 2009

Come on, lemme see ya shake your tail feather


Just sang Turandot and man it kinda takes a dive where Puccini died, doesn't it. Otherwise, goddamn that's some good music.

saladscooper
Jan 25, 2019

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2019
I caught the Met Live in HD presentation of X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X in a local theater yesterday and really enjoyed myself. Funnily enough there was a little bit of Turandot in it (the opening scene especially) but the primary influence I heard was John Adams, which is weird considering I learned this morning that Malcolm X premiered a whole year before Nixon in China. The score has lots of moments, at least one or two per scene, that are all about Groove - there's a bass line and ostinati and improvisation over top, repeat ad nauseam. My favorites were the aria for Malcolm that closes Act I and the scene in Mecca in Act III.

Really it deserves to be done all over the world, but maybe in a better reading than I heard yesterday. I thought the tenor Victor Ryan Robertson did a phenomenal job in both his roles, and Will Liverman's voice seems to have improved a lot since Fire Shut Up a couple years ago, though I wasn't really taken with his acting. The orchestra sounded fantastic and I loved the inclusion of the saxes whenever they showed up, but I got the sense a lot of the groove moments weren't worked out as well as they could've been; especially in Act II they trended towards the cacophonous. But overall! Good poo poo!

zenguitarman posted:

Just sang Turandot and man it kinda takes a dive where Puccini died, doesn't it. Otherwise, goddamn that's some good music.

it's so funny how stark the contrast is. though i'm not sure even puccini could've made us believe in this particular love story.

Buttchocks
Oct 21, 2020

No, I like my hat, thanks.
I heard a great performance of Mahler 5 recently. I enjoy listening to Mahler, but it just goes in one ear and out the other. I can't remember a thing about the piece other than I liked it. I couldn't hum a single melody from it to save my life. I'm not even sure Mahler wrote melodies.

webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005
you have to play Mahler for it to really stick in your ear

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010

:science:
Soiled Meat

Buttchocks posted:

I heard a great performance of Mahler 5 recently. I enjoy listening to Mahler, but it just goes in one ear and out the other. I can't remember a thing about the piece other than I liked it. I couldn't hum a single melody from it to save my life. I'm not even sure Mahler wrote melodies.

Bucket list piece for me performance-wise, especially if I managed to sit Horn 1 on it. The top orchestra at my high school had a couple of excerpts from the final movement as their audition requirements.

Also speaking of which I just got out of seeing Mahler 1 performed, pretty dope stuff.

The Wiggly Wizard
Aug 21, 2008


Had a great time playing Saint Saens 3rd Symphony last night. The composition is flawless and the bass part was challenging in a good way. Unfortunately our organist kind of blew his big moment by tapping the keys a few beats early for the famous C Major chord

webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005
lol

I was supposed to perform Shostakovich Op. 79 next week, but one of my colleagues is sick so I spontaneously agreed to perform Schumanns «Dichterliebe» as a substitute program. Last time I did it was 2009

saladscooper
Jan 25, 2019

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2019

webcams for christ posted:

lol

I was supposed to perform Shostakovich Op. 79 next week, but one of my colleagues is sick so I spontaneously agreed to perform Schumanns «Dichterliebe» as a substitute program. Last time I did it was 2009

lol i just got done writing a paper about dichterliebe

good luck, may your A on "herzen" be blessed

zenguitarman
Apr 6, 2009

Come on, lemme see ya shake your tail feather


That piano postlude at the end gets me every time.

webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005
first rehearsal was last night. the pianist has never played it before but she's a young artist / accompanist for Opernhaus Zurich and is super responsive. trickiest to put together are #3 and #8, but I'm pretty hyped

here's a recording I like for those of you itt who haven't ever given the cycle a listen

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2klB9WebbSk

HisMajestyBOB
Oct 21, 2010


College Slice
My son had his first piano recital yesterday. He played confidently and did well, and I couldn't be more proud of him. :3:
He was really inspired by watching the older students play, and now his goal is to play Beethoven's Pathetique someday.

Buttchocks
Oct 21, 2020

No, I like my hat, thanks.

HisMajestyBOB posted:

My son had his first piano recital yesterday. He played confidently and did well, and I couldn't be more proud of him. :3:
He was really inspired by watching the older students play, and now his goal is to play Beethoven's Pathetique someday.

Awesome!

I know there are some differences between the Disney version and the original Russian, but I did not expect to see King Kong in a ballet production of Cinderella. Yes, it moves.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6G0WG6YwBo&t=2957s

Modal Auxiliary
Jan 14, 2005

To this day no piece of classical has ever done it for me quite like this performance of Handel-Halvorssen Passacaglia. I love the intensity (gimme that accelerando), I love the distinct vibes of each movement, and most importantly I love the counterpoint and the way the instruments play with one another. Any recommendations for similar uptempo minor-key classical stuff?

tristeham
Jul 31, 2022
Probation
Can't post for 3 hours!
going to a bach & mendelssohn violin concerto recital tonight :letsgo:

Mederlock
Jun 23, 2012

You won't recognize Canada when I'm through with it
Grimey Drawer

Modal Auxiliary posted:

To this day no piece of classical has ever done it for me quite like this performance of Handel-Halvorssen Passacaglia. I love the intensity (gimme that accelerando), I love the distinct vibes of each movement, and most importantly I love the counterpoint and the way the instruments play with one another. Any recommendations for similar uptempo minor-key classical stuff?

This live rendition of the Schubert String Quintet at the '09 Aldeburgh Festival by the Arcanto Quartet with Marron(2nd Cello) is my favourite performance of the piece, and I think you'd like it. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00ldtgd . You can't actually buy this recording anywhere so this shouldn't be considered :filez: , so here's a link to it I found online from someone who captured it live off the BBC radio performance when it was aired back in the day

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2ewsE4RAcjjdktlcWZMb3hYbHM/view?usp=sharing&resourcekey=0-UnSyeiSUTikbi5YAyCbMFA

e: I should note that it's not uptempo the entire piece, it's very much a push-pull, slow-fast with intensity and rubato just littered throughout it. It starts slow and lyrical and does lots of evolutions of the same motifs with changes in instrumentation and colouration throughout. Lol, it occurs to me now that I'm reading more about it again that it's not even predominately in a minor key but it still feels intense and dark despite that

Mederlock fucked around with this message at 04:04 on Dec 17, 2023

Buttchocks
Oct 21, 2020

No, I like my hat, thanks.

Mederlock posted:

This live rendition of the Schubert String Quintet at the '09 Aldeburgh Festival by the Arcanto Quartet with Marron(2nd Cello) is my favourite performance of the piece, and I think you'd like it. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00ldtgd . You can't actually buy this recording anywhere so this shouldn't be considered :filez: , so here's a link to it I found online from someone who captured it live off the BBC radio performance when it was aired back in the day

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2ewsE4RAcjjdktlcWZMb3hYbHM/view?usp=sharing&resourcekey=0-UnSyeiSUTikbi5YAyCbMFA

e: I should note that it's not uptempo the entire piece, it's very much a push-pull, slow-fast with intensity and rubato just littered throughout it. It starts slow and lyrical and does lots of evolutions of the same motifs with changes in instrumentation and colouration throughout. Lol, it occurs to me now that I'm reading more about it again that it's not even predominately in a minor key but it still feels intense and dark despite that

Years ago I read a book called Ensemble that is a bunch of essays about various chamber music works, and one of the chapters was about that Schubert quintet. I was pleased to discover it's still available on Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/Ensemble-Rehearsal-Guide-Thirty-Chamber/dp/0931340454

Rinkles
Oct 24, 2010

What I'm getting at is...
Do you feel the same way?
I didn't realize Rachmaninoff and Horowitz ever played together

    In Los Angeles in the early 1940s, just before Rachmaninoff's death, he and Vladimir Horowitz were at a party and played the piece [Suite No. 2, Op. 17], the only time they ever did.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_No._2_(Rachmaninoff)

zenguitarman
Apr 6, 2009

Come on, lemme see ya shake your tail feather


saladscooper posted:

lol i just got done writing a paper about dichterliebe

good luck, may your A on "herzen" be blessed

Yo, did your paper include this



because what the gently caress, Robert. Why?? Why did you throw that Eb next to the D? WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfL5D_MN5bE

My favorite.

saladscooper
Jan 25, 2019

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2019

zenguitarman posted:

Yo, did your paper include this



because what the gently caress, Robert. Why?? Why did you throw that Eb next to the D? WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

ok so i look at this and i think "this has to be a Db right. like this edition hosed up somehow." so i go and check the barenreiter and nope this was intended.

thanks robert ???

BWV
Feb 24, 2005


Finally listed to Vikingur Olafsson's recording of the Goldberg Variations from this year and it's already one of my favourite versions in recent memory. His piano is so warm, almost too mellow at the start, but then once it gets going he really makes it his own. It's much less percussive than Gould and you miss the low end in some parts, but on the whole it's a brilliant recording and brings a fresh approach that is always tender and often playful. Very much looking forward to seeing him play the entire set in person come February as he's on a massive tour for it at the moment.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.
\
RIP to a real one: https://www.classical-scene.com/2024/01/17/peter-schickele-88/

The obits are naturally more focused on PDQ Bach, but if you're old enough (and enough of a nerd), his Schickele Mix on public radio was probably more important to you.

webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005
o7 Maestro

cloudchamber
Aug 6, 2010

You know what the Ukraine is? It's a sitting duck. A road apple, Newman. The Ukraine is weak. It's feeble. I think it's time to put the hurt on the Ukraine
RIP

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiXn8jMlvh8

Buttchocks
Oct 21, 2020

No, I like my hat, thanks.
That's a bummer. I enjoyed a lot his non-PDQ stuff too. I used to record episodes of Schickele Mix while it was still on the air. Looks like most of it's on google podcast and podcast addict now.

zenguitarman
Apr 6, 2009

Come on, lemme see ya shake your tail feather


I have a bunch of his weird rear end tunes in my choral library at school, maybe I'll program something by him this spring. RIP

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.
\

zenguitarman posted:

I have a bunch of his weird rear end tunes in my choral library at school, maybe I'll program something by him this spring. RIP
We did this in my HS glee club. The parents got a kick out if it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0TujWPfxSk

Blurred
Aug 26, 2004

WELL I WONNER WHAT IT'S LIIIIIKE TO BE A GOOD POSTER
Random question, but let's say you're really good at composing: what are your chances of having that composition performed? Do people write symphonies for fun, or do they only do that when they know they have a particular orchestra at their disposal? Was Henryk Gorecki a nepo baby or what?

webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005
it's not that different from film directing. anyone can go to film school, and you can get quite good and maybe be the best in your class. that doesn't mean you'll have a huge career.

without connections, many would be happy to be paid a living wage to shoot commercials that appear on YouTube. maybe you crowd-fund and go into debt to do an indie-film. maybe you give up on directing and take a steady job as a 2nd DP for a soap opera which still puts you in like the top 1% of people who have a film degree

without money and connections, it's hard to imagine producers handing you the reins to direct a Hollywood feature film. it's hard to get producers to know you even exist.

likewise performing a symphony at an international level is extremely capital intensive (operas even more so). classical music institutions run on tight budgets and have to sell tickets.

there's certainly infrastructure to bring up the next generation of composers, and it's facially "meritocratic" but it's really difficult without a safety net / Patrons / trust fund to spend all your time composing, doing competitions, working with young artists and chamber ensembles who can't afford to pay much for a commission, and doing tons of self-promotion and networking.

if the bar is to get a symphony performed, period. then study composition and get a job teaching high school or middle school orchestra

webcams for christ fucked around with this message at 21:59 on Jan 20, 2024

The Wiggly Wizard
Aug 21, 2008


A lot of community orchestras are eager to play world premier compositions and will even pay a modest commission. Not exactly prestigious or high-paying, but it’s something.

Also when I was in youth orchestra, we played a fair number of world premiers. Young and or local composers, mostly. Not sure if we paid them

Buttchocks
Oct 21, 2020

No, I like my hat, thanks.
That reminds me a story I heard about a youth choir that wanted to commission a chorale from Arvo Pärt. They got in touch with him and Mr. Pärt asked how long they need it to be. The director asked what his rates for commissions are and he said £1,000/minute. So the director said, "Great, we'd like a 1-minute chorale."

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webcams for christ
Nov 2, 2005
drat that's a steal. then they get to advertise their concert as a Pärt world premiere which would have a very good chance of paying for itself. I feel like if that rate is true it must have been a while ago

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