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oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


For anyone in the Western United States; tickets have gone on sale (and have been for a little while) for the Aspen and Jackson Hole Music Festivals. Both of them are pretty good; the Jackson Hole one has a Mauler Symphony and a few other interesting shows, and the Aspen festival has top notch stuff like they always do.

The one in Aspen is probably better, but is also more expensive.

Edit: In actual music-chat; I have been listening to Charles Griffes a lot in the last few days. He died very young, so his body of work is very small. He's an American from the early 20th century, before Ives/Copeland etc., and the music is very much indicative of that time. I would call it schizophrenic: on one hand strangely evocative of a country that is unsure of itself and its place in the world, and on the other, very imitative of the impressionistic and romantic traditions of France and Russia.

His Sonata is very much his magnum opus-- a very disturbing and evocative work, but I would suggest listening to part of his roman suites here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSwu...eature=related, and his scherzo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0BmQGzYG34 to get a small handle on his music before taking it on.

Sonata pt 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbLA6nwjeJY
pt 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHIf...feature=related

oilcheck my ass fucked around with this message at May 5, 2011 around 21:22

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SpeedoJoe
Feb 23, 2006


I've been listening to Beethoven's 9th symphony on and off for the last couple of months now. Cycling to work, at the gym, walking down the street. It makes me care about my future.

It is his greatest work.

Edit: At times listening to Stars of the Lid I sometimes feel like I'm listening to some kind of neo-classical music. Anyone else get this?

SpeedoJoe fucked around with this message at May 8, 2011 around 22:33

stringstheory
Mar 3, 2005

if you wish to roll a joint from scratch you must first invent the universe


SpeedoJoe posted:

I've been listening to Beethoven's 9th symphony on and off for the last couple of months now. Cycling to work, at the gym, walking down the street. It makes me care about my future.

It is his greatest work.

I love the 9th, but I have to say that I really feel like the 8th is a little hidden treasure that I've been listening to a lot lately; it's probably my favourite work of the bunch. What's neat about it is that you can hear a short "preview" of the 9th's last movement sorta make an appearance about 4 minutes into the 8th's last movement. If you haven't give it a listen, I think it's far too underrated.

What makes me chuckle is that when asked why the 7th was more popular than the 8th Beethoven replied, "because the 8th is so much better".

I just love Beethoven.

SpeedoJoe
Feb 23, 2006


Just finished listening to the 8th, it's good and it may grow on me in the future, but it doesn't have that feeling of awe and inspiration I get so much from the 9th.

Listening to the 7th now. I can see why it was more popular at the time. It seems more readily digestible.

Edit: Got them mixed up.

SpeedoJoe fucked around with this message at May 9, 2011 around 18:54

An Enormous Boner
Jul 12, 2009



This is an excerpt one of my favorite 20th-century pieces.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hg_foLznbLY


Here's something that's fun to see from this perspective. It shows how idiomatic this music is for the instrument.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxnQL8QpTTE

Smoove J
Sep 13, 2003

yeah Meade's ok I spose

Would anyone be so kind as to name the piece being played in this clip from 'La Pianiste' ?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4pD123Q7kE
From context, I believe it is Schubert or Schumann or someone.

The section from 0:33-1:24 is particularly beautiful. I'm almost given the impression that, throughout the short clip, small sections from three different movements are being played, but I wish I knew...

Dr. Witherbone
Nov 1, 2010

CHEESE LOOKS ON IN
DESPAIR BUT ALSO WITH
AN ERECTION


Smoove J posted:

Would anyone be so kind as to name the piece being played in this clip from 'La Pianiste' ?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4pD123Q7kE
From context, I believe it is Schubert or Schumann or someone.

The section from 0:33-1:24 is particularly beautiful. I'm almost given the impression that, throughout the short clip, small sections from three different movements are being played, but I wish I knew...

I think there's multiple pieces being played. Here's one of them, anyways:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXU7...D48FE1849775F5A

Smoove J
Sep 13, 2003

yeah Meade's ok I spose

That's it! Thank you, very helpful. I haven't been interested in classical music since my piano days, but this has brought about a resurgence of interest. Time to go through this thread and find some new faves.

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


Dr. Witherbone posted:

I think there's multiple pieces being played. Here's one of them, anyways:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXU7...D48FE1849775F5A

Yeah, Rachmaninov and Schumann I think.

As a side note: that guy's hair is absolutely hilarious. He's like that in every single video I've seen of him.

I'd listen to this instead: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CLYvsX88gU

Horowitz's interpretation (wrong notes aside in the middle) is pretty much perfect. His ability to keep the left hand to a subtle ripple while bringing out the bell-like qualities of the melody is amazing.

Also, as Rubenstein liked to say "Horowitz wins the octave contest." Those runs.

Smoove J
Sep 13, 2003

yeah Meade's ok I spose

Herr Napalm posted:

I'd listen to this instead: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CLYvsX88gU

I've been listening to Richter's interpretation, but Gilels and Horowitz seem to play with more feeling (on this particular prelude, at least).

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


Smoove J posted:

I've been listening to Richter's interpretation, but Gilels and Horowitz seem to play with more feeling (on this particular prelude, at least).

Richter's interpretations of Rachmaninov tend to draw vehement reactions in one direction or the other. He's arguably the best interpreter of Debussy to have ever recorded or performed, but the sort of fire that you find in the Russian romantics seems to be slightly out of his purview. [As an interesting side note, the only other person with an argument, Walter Gieseking, had much the same problem. He did a recording of some Rachmaninov that was definitely met with mixed reviews. When he was asked why he decided to record it, he replied "I just got tired of playing soft all the time."]

If you want to hear Richter in his chosen element, youtube has pretty good recordings of him playing the complete Debussy preludes. Start here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFVSI7SLH4k

KrzysztofKomeda
Jan 5, 2009


Herr Napalm posted:

If you want to hear Richter in his chosen element, youtube has pretty good recordings of him playing the complete Debussy preludes. Start here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFVSI7SLH4k

Incidentally, my favourite Richter moment is his interpretation of the Scriabin 6th Sonata. I really thought I'd heard that piece before; and then I heard Richter's.

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


KrzysztofKomeda posted:

Incidentally, my favourite Richter moment is his interpretation of the Scriabin 6th Sonata. I really thought I'd heard that piece before; and then I heard Richter's.

Richter's Scriabin interpretations are very very good. I'm unsure if he did the 8th or not (by far the most difficult, and, incidentally, the last Scriabin actually completed) but it and no. 7 seem to be the one that would lend themselves best to his incredible talent.

Lorcrimes
Jul 22, 2007
The Lor on Terror

I have another ID request if anyone would be kind enough to help me out - in a clip from an old Brazilian movie. The song is a Waltz, maybe Chopin (but doesn't seem to be any of his most famous as I checked). It might also be in A-flat major but I really don't know what I am talking about.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toqT...outu.be&t=6m19s

I am absolutely positive I have heard this elsewhere before but I'm stumped...

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


Lorcrimes posted:

I have another ID request if anyone would be kind enough to help me out - in a clip from an old Brazilian movie. The song is a Waltz, maybe Chopin (but doesn't seem to be any of his most famous as I checked). It might also be in A-flat major but I really don't know what I am talking about.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toqT...outu.be&t=6m19s

I am absolutely positive I have heard this elsewhere before but I'm stumped...

Sounds a lot like Chopin's A-flat major one, but it's not a Chopin Valse that I'm aware of. Don't think its Brahms either.

Lorcrimes
Jul 22, 2007
The Lor on Terror

Herr Napalm posted:

Sounds a lot like Chopin's A-flat major one, but it's not a Chopin Valse that I'm aware of. Don't think its Brahms either.

Thanks, that's the closest I've been able to get as well. Maybe it's some sort of obscure variation on Chopin's, certain parts are verbatim.

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


Lorcrimes posted:

Thanks, that's the closest I've been able to get as well. Maybe it's some sort of obscure variation on Chopin's, certain parts are verbatim.

Yeah; might just be a variation. They did that often for movies.

o.m. 94
Nov 23, 2009



nigga plays a disjointed ligeti. ill let him off.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5IKiMM0I0w

again a disjointed pace but hell, what can you do
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkGpYoRKvS8

Jinnigan
Feb 12, 2007

We shall pay him a visit. There will be a picnic. Tea shall be served.

I've been listening to a lot, a lot of Piazzolla. This might apply to a lot of artists (?) perhaps but I really enjoy his mix of melody and dissonance as well as his fun sense of timing and tempo. I also listen to some classically-inspired metal if that helps at all.

Anyways I was hoping for some more recommendations along this line? The Rachmaninoff posted earlier was really good. If someone could make a few specific recommendations of Rachmaninoff's work, that'd be great - dude just has a huge body of work and I don't know where to start! Same for Stravinsky - I've got Rites of Spring, but other than that I'm lost.

Dr. Witherbone
Nov 1, 2010

CHEESE LOOKS ON IN
DESPAIR BUT ALSO WITH
AN ERECTION


Jinnigan posted:

I've been listening to a lot, a lot of Piazzolla. This might apply to a lot of artists (?) perhaps but I really enjoy his mix of melody and dissonance as well as his fun sense of timing and tempo. I also listen to some classically-inspired metal if that helps at all.

Anyways I was hoping for some more recommendations along this line? The Rachmaninoff posted earlier was really good. If someone could make a few specific recommendations of Rachmaninoff's work, that'd be great - dude just has a huge body of work and I don't know where to start! Same for Stravinsky - I've got Rites of Spring, but other than that I'm lost.

Seconding this. I know of both composers, but all I only know their hits and what's played by my local symphony, which isn't exactly anything obscure.

For content, I suppose I'll keep on pimping out Salieri. His overtures are pretty wonderful, if you ask me, and history seems to agree. In fact, this one was so great it inspired Hector Berlioz to drop medical school and compose music:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4gN...D48FE1849775F5A

Dr. Video Games 0081
Jan 19, 2005

He tries to tell people that he is alone, all by himself; he wants to love and be loved. His music is a call for acceptance, respect, love, underst

For Stravinsky ballets a nice one is Petrushka from a few years before Rite of Spring.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkg_lJeHmjs

Agon is a neat late ballet after he had adopted twelve-tone writing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jz0mqFnZhLk

He has some sick symphonies, the Symphony in C

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUfjcqg07M8

and the Symphony in Three Movements

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIrlgRt8Dg8

Lots of good religious choral music like the Symphony of Psalms

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JN__SpkeFEU

or the Requiem Canticles, another twelve-tone piece from later in his life

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=668QWMK-maQ

Some Stravinsky links earlier in the thread: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...3#post386881294

Speaking of religious choral music Szymanowski's Stabat Mater totally owns

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZ-wUTycX8Y

KrzysztofKomeda
Jan 5, 2009


Jinnigan posted:

Anyways I was hoping for some more recommendations along this line? The Rachmaninoff posted earlier was really good. If someone could make a few specific recommendations of Rachmaninoff's work, that'd be great - dude just has a huge body of work and I don't know where to start!

Here's a good few starters for Rachmaninoff:

Piano Concerto 2 in C minor
Piano Concerto 3 In D minor - Martha Argerich soloist
Symphony No. 2 in E minor
The Isle of the Dead
Cello Sonata in G minor
Rhapsody on a theme of Paganini - Vladimir Ashkenazy soloist
Preludes (Piano) op23 and op32

I couldn't find the best interpretations on youtube so I gave them a skip. I stuck in names where particularly important. The Argerich Rach 3 in particular is as good as unparalleled.

Hope this helps. Oh, and if you're getting into Stravinsky be sure not to ignore Prokofiev, without even mentioning his ballets or symphonys; his 2nd and 3rd piano concertos are incredible and don't get me started talking about his violin sonatas - I'd be here all day.

oilcheck my ass
Mar 8, 2006

Well, hello ladies.


KrzysztofKomeda posted:

Here's a good few starters for Rachmaninoff:

Piano Concerto 2 in C minor
Piano Concerto 3 In D minor - Martha Argerich soloist
Symphony No. 2 in E minor
The Isle of the Dead
Cello Sonata in G minor
Rhapsody on a theme of Paganini - Vladimir Ashkenazy soloist
Preludes (Piano) op23 and op32

I couldn't find the best interpretations on youtube so I gave them a skip. I stuck in names where particularly important. The Argerich Rach 3 in particular is as good as unparalleled.

Hope this helps. Oh, and if you're getting into Stravinsky be sure not to ignore Prokofiev, without even mentioning his ballets or symphonys; his 2nd and 3rd piano concertos are incredible and don't get me started talking about his violin sonatas - I'd be here all day.

Also: all of his etudes tableaux. As far as interpretation goes: look for anything by Ashkenazy, Horowitz, or Agerich. They tend to be among the best interpretations and are relatively easy to find on youtube. For any of his real virtuosic piano stuff [some of the preludes, couple of the etudes, the completely loving awesome moment musicaux no. 4, etc. etc.], I would also suggest Marc-Andre Hamelin.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


I found a soundboard recording of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue a little while ago and now I'm kinda going nuts for Bernstein. What're some of his best works? I'm familiar with 1600 (and the thorougly un-fun White House Cantata), Candide, and West Side Story but really nothing else.

Also, 1600's not a bad show at all. I wish it hadn't crashed and burned like it did, because then we might have a proper recording of Patricia Routledge singing Duet For One.

Juanita Xtreme
Jul 17, 2010


I would definitely recommend Englishman Ralph Vaughan Williams, he is one of my favourite composers, and is influenced by a lot of English folk music and hymns. A lot of his stuff kind of contradicts against typical structures and involves strange modes and key changes but it's all done extremely well. A lot of it invokes images of the traditional English countryside:

The Lark Ascending:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5yPdAjzihY
My all-time favourite piece, I have never heard someone make a violin sing like that before. Absolutely beautiful.

Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkMI...feature=related (part I)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Nxj...feature=related (part II)

There's a section in part II at around 2.50 which is just incredible, so unexpected and I really enjoy the uplifting feel of it. Also in this recording I love how the large hall is changing the acoustics.

There is also the third movement in his Fifth symphony, Romanza which is lovely:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AP_desQX68

But I definitely recommend listening to the whole thing if you have time

Juanita Xtreme fucked around with this message at Jun 20, 2011 around 12:26

KrzysztofKomeda
Jan 5, 2009


Juanita Xtreme posted:

I would definitely recommend Englishman Ralph Vaughan Williams, he is one of my favourite composers, and is influenced by a lot of English folk music and hymns. A lot of his stuff kind of contradicts against typical structures and involves strange modes and key changes but it's all done extremely well. A lot of it invokes images of the traditional English countryside:

The Lark Ascending:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5yPdAjzihY
My all-time favourite piece, I have never heard someone make a violin sing like that before. Absolutely beautiful.

Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkMI...feature=related (part I)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Nxj...feature=related (part II)

There's a section in part II at around 2.30 which is just incredible, so unexpected and I really enjoy the uplifting feel of it. Also in this recording I love how the large hall is changing the acoustics.

There is also the third movement in his Fifth symphony, Romanza which is lovely:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AP_desQX68

But I definitely recommend listening to the whole thing if you have time

Went through a month or so phase of listening to nothing but Vaughan Williams a few years ago. Those pieces indeed sweep you off your feet. I have an abnormally large collection of Vaughan Williams work now and would definitely consider him a favourite of mine.
He was a fantastic symphonist and I agree that his 5th is phenominal but I still rate his 8th and 6th as his best. He has a great amount of underappreciated lesser pieces too such as his fantastic String Quartet No.2 or the Oboe Concerto.
Great composer who I really enjoy seeing other people appreciate!

Juanita Xtreme
Jul 17, 2010


^^^ Admittedly I think I need to listen to more of his works. I'm mainly only familiar with the 5th Symphony as i'm currently studying it in my A Level course and it's really interesting

Your post has reminded me of a few more I forgot to add!

Vaughan Williams' Phantasy Quintet is also pleasant to listen to and relatively digestible if you are not used to listening to long pieces of music:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TiW1TrFtrGI Part I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5feS8QD8oo Part II
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_3pJUZUd2s Part III

I also discovered a Youtube playlist of his today, and I found a pastoral poem he has arranged into piece of choral music, 'Linden Lea' (which I am usually not a fan of):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvoYHwYDYLA


On the subject of choral music, I am more of a fan of relatively modern arrangements, with composers such as Eric Whitacre:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1sYkJHipvg 'Lux Aurumque', The passage at 1.20 is beautiful.

Also I am not sure whether any of you watched the Royal Wedding, but a man named Paul Mealor contributed an arrangement of 'Ubi Caritas et Amor', set to another arrangement of his called 'Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal'.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQE4ryqdvMg
I'm not sure why, but the image of the two standing at the altar, almost suspended, while set to this piece gives me chills every time I see it. I also recommend watching some kind of space visuals video while it's playing, it's really relaxing!

And for comparison, "Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal" -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEIY...feature=related


This post ended up being longer than I wanted it to be, I apologize!

Juanita Xtreme fucked around with this message at Jun 20, 2011 around 13:55

TIGER HOODZ
Aug 3, 2009

Bitches ain't shit but hoes and tricks


Whoa wait. Has the 2nd movement of Beethoven's 7th Symphony been intentionally left out? I feel like I got mega-trolled. Some big wigs (Franz Schubert, Richard Wagner) called it the best piece of music ever written.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7F4z8FV6ME

BrilliantFool
Jan 23, 2007

Bravo.


Hello, fellow classical music loving goons! If you haven't already, go watch The Red Violin! And if you don't like movies, then just listen to some of these awesome songs from the soundtrack, with solos played by the esteemed Joshua Bell (there's some talking in the first video, but I can't find a version without it):

http://youtu.be/NoFT5Kr3pRA
http://youtu.be/jZ5EX4VF9EI

Also, I am a harpist, so I figure that means I have to share my favorite harp songs.

Handel's Harp Concerto in B-Flat Major:
http://youtu.be/b8vMHTvdoEQ

Mozart's Harp and Flute Concerto:
http://youtu.be/9EsR0Fy5Ic4

Faure's Sicilienne for Harp and Flute:
http://youtu.be/KweXColOsgQ

And if you like listening to songs with lots of harp in them I'd also suggest Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet and Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus.

Jinnigan
Feb 12, 2007

We shall pay him a visit. There will be a picnic. Tea shall be served.

just wanted to throw out these videos because i loving love these things!! hell yeah visual representations of music that aren't just a score (as great as a traditional score is it's just not the same)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhXHMzSOK5c

these videos are basically orgasms on demand. imo

Jinnigan fucked around with this message at Jul 27, 2011 around 00:47

Mahler
Oct 30, 2008

He does the crossword every day.

Cross posting from a thread in PYF.

Mahler posted:

I'm gonna post some stuff that has been impressing me for a while.

First off is a piece by Leos Janacek. My interest to date has mostly been in his straight-up orchestral works like Sinfonietta and Taras Bulba. More recently I've been checking out orchestral excerpts from his operas. The Overture to "The Makropulos Affair" has my favorite type of stylistic blend, a kind of Urban Ruckus mixed with intense lyricism.

Here's the best version I could find on you tube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbA1...nel_video_title

Arthur Honegger is mostly remembered for his spiky sound poems like Pacific 231 (which actually has little to nothing to do with trains, according to the composer) and Rugby, but I find his First Symphony more to my liking. Again, I'm running with the theme of "Urban-ness" meets lyrical, which is my impression of what's going on in this piece.

Here's the first movement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xLbg1lei6c

And here's Pacific 231 for good measure: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COhy...feature=related

Dispensing with the lyrical, lets move on to 1920's Russia, where all sorts of awesome business was going on before Stalin hosed everything up in the following decades. Alexander Mossolov's Zavod (Foundry, from his lost ballet "Stal")is a fascinating piece that keeps piling on parts to an already dissonant ostinato. Combine this with an aggressive melody.

Pretty overpowering stuff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq1-_UPwYSM

I see that some of you have posted Prokofiev's piano concertos. But wait, there's more! The Second and Third Symphonies are busy essays in badassery.

Second Symphony (!) First movement (!!!): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZ6_SOag3pE

That's it for now, I might post more later.

tuckfard
Dec 8, 2003

Just chillin

This thread needs some more band music.

Behold the greatest band piece of all time, Holst's First Suite in Eb
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ehb6IiMp9d8

(Here's the Second Suite in F for the losers who like this one better): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6AMkKsPams


Lots of Grainger talk already which is cool. Sucks that he was a lovely guy because he made some great music.

Paul Hindemith is also pretty badass. For winds he has Symphony in Bb which is definitely worth checking out.
1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63mpGEpbVxk
2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnXk...feature=related
3. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDqt...feature=related

Very important piece in the band world.

He is also super well known for his Symphonic Metamorphoses on Themes by Carl Maria von Weber of which I think the march is one of the best things: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpxVGaq5TBI


And finally, a lesser known band piece that I'm incredibly fond of is Symphony No. 3 "Slavyanskaya" by Boris Kozhevnikov. Definitely check this out if you want to get pumped up to conquer the world: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0zEe8Bfees

tuckfard fucked around with this message at Jul 29, 2011 around 20:12

Harminoff
Oct 24, 2005

listerine and mr. green

Any of you pick up Kashiwa Daisuke's new album 88? Just wanted to share this, and figured you guys would enjoy it the most.

Here is a select track from it, but the whole album is amazing. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5X5X0thXPCU

Foyes36
Oct 23, 2005

Food fight!

I can't stop listening to John Adams' Nixon in China, especially this aria:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwHx...feature=related

Live performance:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mtMI_huRtY

Opus125
Jul 29, 2011

by Y Kant Ozma Post


For those of you looking for a lot of great discussion of classical music, this is probably the best online forum for the genre (that I know of):

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php

I started reading it in 2004 and it's always been a pretty active forum (and it's off-topic forum is pretty great.) Lots of eloquent discussion in that place and members are often intimidatingly knowledgeable and fanatic about classical music.

I myself discovered classical music after (what else?) seeing the film Amadeus in 2003 and discovering that a friend of mine was already very knowledgeable about the subject. Within two weeks I went from not knowing what a concerto was and thinking the whole of Beethoven's 9th was the Scherzo to owning most of the man's symphonies and concerti. I would make weekly trips to Tower Records to buy new CDs, and boy did that store have a decent classical isle. I've become familiar with the most composers from the baroque to the late romantics.

My favorite piece is the Sibelius Violin Concerto, which I accidentally discovered after it came bundled with a CD of the Tchaikovsky violin concerto.

Unfortunately my listening and passion has waned over the years due to other interests, though I did catch two great performances last year of Mahler's Resurrection symphony (which was sublime) and Beethoven's Opus 125 (a performance I was underwhelmed by but oddly enough mesmerized by when I caught it again on radio).

CowOnCrack
Sep 26, 2004

Cocaine bitches.

My piano instructor just introduced me to the modern composer Alfred Schnittke and I'm really, really starting to like this guy and his boldness. He is the inventor of 'polystylism' and makes use of just about everything from every era of classical era to create strange and beautiful music. In addition to sounding just like classical music should, it's music that reflects the backdrop of the mid-late 20th century - the disconnected, jaded, and terrible era that it was.

Also, for those interested in musical history, Alfred Schnittke might end up being the last great classical composer. His works are mostly from the 60s/70s and are featured heavily in television and cinema. There hasn't been a composer in the 40 year gap since then who has been prolific enough to have written works for every instrumental arrangement and style (Orchestral, Concerto, Choral, Chamber, Opera, Ballets, and Solo Instrumental).

A lot of of Alfred Schnittke's music is hyper-intellectual in its how it is composed, and therefore can be an acquired taste appealing to experienced classical music listeners, but much of it also AT THE SAME TIME attempts and succeeds at being great for casual listening as well! For starters, I would check out his Piano Concertos - his first is recognizable and enjoyable by anyone with any background, while his second and third are more an acquired taste. His Viola Concerto is the clear winner for the best of that kind with incredibly lush and dark melodies that explore the darker character of this instrument (which is rarely featured as the center-stage instrument in a concerto). Finally, his Concerti Grossi (especially #1) are some of the strangest and most beautiful pieces in modern music, and it's in these compositions especially where the music wears its eclecticism, intellectualism, and anachronism proudly.

Schnittke is might just be the incredibly rare musical genius of his time who will only later be appreciated as a towering figure in classical music. Or he may just be a composer with limited popular appeal who will fade into obscurity. In any case, his style of music is idiosyncratic in the truest sense of the word - totally and uniquely his. Structurally, it is extremely intelligent and innovative which makes him quite popular with other composers and hardcore classical music buffs. Yet, at the same time it has had the appeal to become soundtracks for many famous movies. As he put it, "The goal of my life is to unify serious music and light music, even if I break my neck in doing so." I think this music has wide appeal to anyone who loves music and loves something different. I hope that he will exert his influence much more broadly in years to come and his works will become more widely appreciated outside of his contributions to cinema.

Mahler
Oct 30, 2008

He does the crossword every day.

Check out Schnittke's Third Symphony if you can. I find the second movement to be one of his better polystylistic statements. I once got a copy of the score shipped to me from California, it's frickin' huge! The opening movement has a 64 voice cannon for the string choir that is just absolutely nuts. Even the huge oversized score (about 50CM) was not tall enough to contain all the staves. Some parts of the symphony require you to take out loose leafs that extend the score to 3-4 feet in height. Pretty loving impractical.

Here's a youtube of it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RWe...tailpage#t=712s

Mahler fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2011 around 15:05

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



CowOnCrack posted:

Also, for those interested in musical history, Alfred Schnittke might end up being the last great classical composer. His works are mostly from the 60s/70s and are featured heavily in television and cinema. There hasn't been a composer in the 40 year gap since then who has been prolific enough to have written works for every instrumental arrangement and style (Orchestral, Concerto, Choral, Chamber, Opera, Ballets, and Solo Instrumental).

Lachenmann, Rihm, Saariaho and Neuwirth (at least) fit this in spirit if not in letter.

Dr. Witherbone
Nov 1, 2010

CHEESE LOOKS ON IN
DESPAIR BUT ALSO WITH
AN ERECTION


CowOnCrack posted:

Also, for those interested in musical history, Alfred Schnittke might end up being the last great classical composer. His works are mostly from the 60s/70s and are featured heavily in television and cinema. There hasn't been a composer in the 40 year gap since then who has been prolific enough to have written works for every instrumental arrangement and style (Orchestral, Concerto, Choral, Chamber, Opera, Ballets, and Solo Instrumental).

Philip Glass fits your criteria pretty well. I don't know if there will ever really be a "last great classical composer", I don't see the genre ever completely dying.

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Pork Pie Hat
Apr 27, 2011

by Shine


Dr. Witherbone posted:

Overture to 'Cublai, gran kan de' Tartari' This piece was never played during his lifetime due to political reasons I don't fully understand.

Essentially this is because the opera in question was seen as being far too liberal and satirical by both Leopold II and subsequently Francis II, both Holy Roman Emperor.

Both of these chaps were very keen on keeping the established order as just that, established, so an opera satirising court intrigue and autocracy was not going to go down too well.

It's worth bearing in mind that Leopold II's sister was Marie Antoinette, and what was soon going to happen to people like her in France...

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