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Pork Pie Hat
Apr 27, 2011

by Shine


Bondage posted:

I'm really digging Baroque. Currently my favorites are Johann S Bach, Locatelli and Corelli. Also have listened to Telemann and Purcell. Can anyone recommend some decent Baroque?

If you liked Purcell you won't go far wrong with Orlando Gibbons, Thomas Tallis, John Blow and William Byrd.

If you only listen to one thing by any of those four, make sure it's Tallis' Spem In Alium.

Pork Pie Hat fucked around with this message at Oct 18, 2011 around 20:37

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fuf
Sep 12, 2004

haha

Hello old thread.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a book (or maybe a documentary series?) that explains the basic concepts behind classical music and especially Baroque music?

I'm reading a book about Leibniz's philosophy and the author has a torturous analogy to Baroque music, so I need to know what stuff like 'Basso continuo' means, and also more basic stuff like harmony and counterpoint.

I want a 'mid-level' kind of book: I don't really know anything about music theory but I'm not an idiot and I'm prepared to put some effort in.

crazyvanman
Dec 31, 2010


fuf posted:

Does anyone have a recommendation for a book?

I don't know if this is really what you're after and it might seem like a bit of an obvious answer, but if you don't mind something that's not prose you could go for the Oxford Dictionary of Music. It has all the definitions you could need for musical terms as well as fairly detailed information on plenty of composers. My piano teacher bought it for me after 10 years of lessons with her, and it's a really excellent book with a lot more detail than you would expect.

KrzysztofKomeda
Jan 5, 2009


I love Schnittke. I'll just jump in to recommend his Piano Quintet to chamber music fans who want somewhere to start with him, it's incredible. If you like dark, melancholic, morbid and often creepy; and if you love a composer who can brilliantly contrast eerie serenity with cacaphonic power then this deserves your time.

thunderspanks
Nov 5, 2003

crucify this

Every couple of weeks I'll hit up the local thrift stores searching for old vinyl records to add to my growing collection. I noticed pretty fast that there are always heaps of classical records being donated and a few weeks ago I decided it was time to start taking advantage of that. I'm currently listening to Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, having just finished Tchaikovsky's sixth, and up next is Stravinsky's Petrouchka. I also just found out that the local symphony is putting on Beethoven's 7th in April and I can go at 60% off ticket price because I'm under 30 (!). I didn't realize they were so desperate to widen their demographics but gently caress if I'm going to complain.

AARO
Mar 8, 2005


Górecki's Symfonia III (Symfonia pieśni zalosnych) Pieśń II is maing me pretty happy to be alive these days.

http://youtu.be/brotY-aMCBE

Stuporstar
May 5, 2008

Where do fists come from?


fuf posted:

Hello old thread.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a book (or maybe a documentary series?) that explains the basic concepts behind classical music and especially Baroque music?

I'm reading a book about Leibniz's philosophy and the author has a torturous analogy to Baroque music, so I need to know what stuff like 'Basso continuo' means, and also more basic stuff like harmony and counterpoint.

I want a 'mid-level' kind of book: I don't really know anything about music theory but I'm not an idiot and I'm prepared to put some effort in.

Watch the four-part BBC documentary How Music Works. It doesn't explain everything, but it covers the basics in a really engaging way.

I have that series to thank for introducing me to Vaughan Williams. My 30 CD set, with everything he's ever done, just came in the mail today, and I spent three hours ripping it. I'm now ready to settle into musical bliss.

timebandit
Mar 22, 2004


Wow I'm insanely jealous, Vaughan Williams is my absolute favorite of all time. Symphony No. 5, specifically the last climax of the first movement, will always be my number one.

Stuporstar
May 5, 2008

Where do fists come from?


Argh, I know. I say "Argh" because it's just taken me another hour to find it and rename half of them, parsing the stupid crap people have inputted into iTunes. I eventually found that one searching via. runtime. It would have taken me three times longer to name them all manually as I ripped them though.

Ok, NOW I can settle into musical bliss.

Seriously though, buy this freaking set. You won't find a better Vaughan Williams collection anywhere. It's amazing.

Stuporstar fucked around with this message at Jan 13, 2012 around 08:18

Mellomeh
Jun 12, 2006


Speaking of Vaughan Williams, a pair of excellent documentaries aired the other night on BBC4 and are available on iPlayer now. There's The Lark Ascending which features a full performance of the original violin and piano arrangement. And there's The Passions of Vaughan Williams which is more of a biography of the man himself.

Mellomeh fucked around with this message at Jan 14, 2012 around 06:56

ProperGanderPusher
Jan 13, 2012


I had the pleasure of finding Kyril Kondrashin's recording of Shostakovich's Execution of Stepan Razin on Youtube a while back. It is, without a doubt, the single most underrated work by the composer. Kondrashin really manages to add a certain "coarseness" to the work that makes it stand out from other recordings and make it sound more authentically Russian:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPlBykom2CQ

Admiral Goodenough
Nov 5, 2008

Ta gueule, laisse-moi finir.

What good pieces with clarinets are there? I just heard a film score that used one extensively, and it struck me as having the loveliest sound in the world.

CRISPYBABY
Dec 15, 2007

*~ayoo comin thru~*


Scope the Mozart clarinet concerto.

Admiral Goodenough
Nov 5, 2008

Ta gueule, laisse-moi finir.

attackmole posted:

Scope the Mozart clarinet concerto.

This is exactly what I was looking for. Anything else?

vv Love it.

Admiral Goodenough fucked around with this message at Jan 18, 2012 around 21:39

littlewashu
Nov 25, 2007

Charles Carmichael always comes quickly.


There's a lovely clarinet solo near the beginning of the third movement of Respighi's The Pines of Rome that always gets me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4k45YTpnx4

taser rates
Mar 30, 2010


Clarinet solo in Rachmaninoff's 2nd Symphony, 3rd movement, one of my favorite moments.

Mellomeh
Jun 12, 2006


Vaughan Williams again, his Six Studies in English Folksong (although originally for the cello) sounds at its best when performed by a clarinet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8oODQzY9tCI

sharktamer
Oct 30, 2011

Shark tamer ridiculous

Stuporstar posted:

Watch the four-part BBC documentary How Music Works. It doesn't explain everything, but it covers the basics in a really engaging way.

Seconding this recommendation. One of my favourite TV series ever.

nakoprex
Aug 30, 2011


Ages ago, I saw an amazing 8-10min clip of animated summaries of various famous operas. The art was very Terry Gilliam-esque with cutout figures moving jerkily and the narrator was a woman who delivered these summaries of all of these tragic operas in a very deadpan voice.

I believe I saw this on either Ovation or one of those public access/university sponsored networks (in the NY metro area.)

Anyone know where this might reside online?

regulargonzalez
Aug 18, 2006

More pretentious than thou


nakoprex posted:

Ages ago, I saw an amazing 8-10min clip of animated summaries of various famous operas. The art was very Terry Gilliam-esque with cutout figures moving jerkily and the narrator was a woman who delivered these summaries of all of these tragic operas in a very deadpan voice.

I believe I saw this on either Ovation or one of those public access/university sponsored networks (in the NY metro area.)

Anyone know where this might reside online?

This one?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vNReqUGtsc

nakoprex
Aug 30, 2011


bingo. thank you regular

Tgent
Sep 6, 2011


oilcheck my rear end posted:

Godowsky is also awesome: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWZLx4a_Dss -- This is a wonderful piece of music. Godowsky was said to have some of the greatest technical ability of any pianist ever, but he never really performed, so it's more just hear-say and stories from his students.

Anyone have an alternate link for this? That link is now "removed" . The piece is The Java Suite X: In The Kraton. If not, can someone recommend a recording to buy online? I'm quite interested in hearing this.

Tgent fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2012 around 04:19

Rogue1-and-a-half
Mar 7, 2011


This past Christmas, I dug out Messiaen's Vingt Regards sur l'Enfant Jesus. The recording by Steven Osborne. Weirdest Christmas music ever. I think at least some of it may be a put-on, like a lot of modernist stuff, but the parts that aren't a put on are some of the most amazing piano composition I've ever heard. There's just a strange, haunted sound to some of the stuff. And on others, the notes are so high and so fast that they actually sound like electronic music. You know, bleeble blurble and all that. It's pretty breathtaking. It's my first Messiaen, but it won't be my last.

Slimchandi
May 13, 2005
That finger on your temple is the barrel of my raygun

Try his Preludes as well, a bit more accessible than the Vingt Regards but still have some great moments. I think Messiaen wrote them as his graduation piece from the Conservatory in his late teens. I received Peter Hill's biography of Messiaen for Christmas and it's fantasticly helpful for putting his compositions in context.

Have you listened to much of his orchestral music?

TheQuietWilds
Sep 8, 2009


I just went on a huge binge of downloading Erik Satie piano pieces. Can you guys recommend any other composers that have a similar sort of style?

Opus125
Jul 29, 2011

by Y Kant Ozma Post


I used to listen to the Concierto de Aranjuez by Rodrigo pretty regularly a few years ago, and today a particular section from the middle movement kept going through my head. It's the conclusive virtuosic solo section which leads to an intense and searing restatement of the movement's theme from the orchestra. The section lasts a couple of minutes starting here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOdw...related#t=13m7s

Well, it was mostly the orchestra section that kept haunting me but it only really works because of the solo build up.

Rogue1-and-a-half
Mar 7, 2011


Slimchandi posted:

Try his Preludes as well, a bit more accessible than the Vingt Regards but still have some great moments. I think Messiaen wrote them as his graduation piece from the Conservatory in his late teens. I received Peter Hill's biography of Messiaen for Christmas and it's fantasticly helpful for putting his compositions in context.

Have you listened to much of his orchestral music?

I have not. The Vingt Regards was the first thing by him that I'd heard. I want to hear the, um, Requiem for the End of Time or something like that. I forget the title.

Anime_Otaku
Dec 6, 2009


I'm hoping for some advice on some albums I found on iTunes. I found a set called "Seven Deadly Sins in Classical Music". I'm looking for opinions from those of you that know more about it weather you'd recommend taking the plunge and getting all 7 albums or just the compilation album which does have the few pieces I already recognised (Dies Irae and O fortuna particularly).

Dr. Video Games 0081
Jan 19, 2005

He tries to tell people that he is alone, all by himself; he wants to love and be loved. His music is a call for acceptance, respect, love, underst

I wouldn't really buy any of them because I think it's frustrating to listen to those collections that just compile a bunch of individual movements from larger works, which is what it seems these collections are. I'd much rather buy a recording that has the entire work on it.

However, if you're just getting into classical it might be useful to hear collections like that to get a sense of pieces you might want to check out more. Collections like this are a dime a dozen though, I don't know that you'd need this specific set.

Also, if you want to hear a lot of classical movements and just kind of see what you might like, there are a lot of other options, like Spotify, Pandora, Youtubes, the radio, your local library, etc.

dutch wife abc
Apr 25, 2012


Brilliant thread. This should help me get into classical that isn't Arvo Pärt.

Speaking of which, "Fratres" is mabye my favourite piece of music ever.

Incredulous Dylan
Oct 22, 2004



Fun Shoe

Opus125 posted:

For those of you looking for a lot of great discussion of classical music, this is probably the best online forum for the genre (that I know of):

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php

I started reading it in 2004 and it's always been a pretty active forum (and it's off-topic forum is pretty great.) Lots of eloquent discussion in that place and members are often intimidatingly knowledgeable and fanatic about classical music.

Hello classical thread - it's been too long! I wanted to thank you for bringing this excellent resource to my attention. In return watch this great candid session with Vladimir Horowitz. He acts like a goofball between pieces while talking about hanging out with Rachmaninoff. I always love how Horowitz could play a stunningly beautiful piece and then come right out of it going 'I am like Mozart!' while laughing like a maniac

Vladimir Horowitz The Last Romantic (1985)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gY_N_8AuDns

As a super amateur piano player I can't be thankful enough that giants like him could live to be filmed in this way. He's just so candid and human - like any old man proud of how he lived and what he can do and just wanting to show off sometimes.

Chatetris
Jun 18, 2012


I'm surprised that not a lot has been talked about Minimalism in this thread, I find it takes much structure from the 19th century type of classical, but in turn makes it's really modern.

For anyone interested taking a dive into 20th century classical I would say try listening to compositions from Minimalist composers instead of Stockhausen,Cage and or Varese.
Music for 18 Musician: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NA2YrlfEe6Y

Boatswain
May 29, 2012


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MEUIGjfHNw

This or some of the Keith Jarrett videos from his Tokyo & Osaka (Radiance tour if I'm not mistaken) are probably my YouTube favorites. There's just so much dark, intense emotion.

Also Starker and Yo/Yo-Ma makes me wish I could play the cello.

Tgent
Sep 6, 2011


Tgent posted:

Anyone have an alternate link for this? That link is now "removed" . The piece is The Java Suite X: In The Kraton. If not, can someone recommend a recording to buy online? I'm quite interested in hearing this.

Here it is for anyone else that's interested:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ZGM_IY_Gug

Synival
Aug 14, 2012

Relax. It's still time for Klax.


Godowsky's studies on Chopin Etudes are pretty fearsome. In this one, he combined two pieces into one - the "black key" etude and the "butterfly" etude. It's pretty mind-boggling if you're familiar with the two pieces:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8U1s57ror8

Here's what he combined:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4pyqLbi2wLU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKeley78hM4

Oh, and while we're on the subject of piano music, ever since Diablo 3's Whimseyshire came out, I've wanted to post this. It's the original piece called 'Gaspard de la Nuit' by Maurice Ravel, in full:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKgcHjq1xKQ

Pretty much everything Ravel wrote is amazing, I'd check out all of it :P

Foyes36
Oct 23, 2005

Food fight!

This piece has been rattling around in my head this week:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1shHPcmNqTw

But goddamn, I seriously love Brahms. I can play it and work for hours.

Synival posted:

Godowsky's studies on Chopin Etudes are pretty fearsome. In this one, he combined two pieces into one - the "black key" etude and the "butterfly" etude. It's pretty mind-boggling if you're familiar with the two pieces:

gently caress yes, Godowsky is the loving best. I'm a huge fan of the Java Suite - there used to be a bunch of it on youtube but most has been taken down. I was able to find my favorite piece though:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ZGM_IY_Gug

(skip past the dumb intro)

Edit: Haha, looks like some already posted it. Here's something else from the suite: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Dw1Huh_Tfg

Foyes36 fucked around with this message at Aug 15, 2012 around 18:17

o.m. 94
Nov 23, 2009



Rogue1-and-a-half posted:

I have not. The Vingt Regards was the first thing by him that I'd heard. I want to hear the, um, Requiem for the End of Time or something like that. I forget the title.

"Quatuor pour la fin du temps" or "Quartet for the end of time". Written during the war in a German prisoner-of-war camp. The chief guard was fond of music and allowed him to compose. He & musicians performed the debut with some knackered old instruments in a freezing cold block in front of 100 odd people (IIRC); it's essentially about the biblical angels heralding the end of time and it's got serious backstory cred

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-augc3hjk8

Easily the best thing I've ever heard of his. Sorrowful, yearning, uplifting and every other emotion, the sort of thing I imagine playing as the edifice of western capitalism collapses around us

dromer
Aug 19, 2012

THUNDERDOME LOSER

Does anyone have recommendations for good brass pieces to listen to? While I love listening to symphonies and piano pieces, too much of the same timbre tends to make me zone out.

Also, I've been looking into non-minimalist modern composers. Does anyone have recommendations?

hawk989s
Feb 13, 2003

  • 244 Points
  • 226 Minutes
  • 6 Overtimes
  • 2 Days
  • One for the ages


Check out Eric Ewazen's work for brass quintets. The American Brass Quintet has recorded a bunch of pieces. Shadowcatcher and Colchester Fantasy come to mind. Amazing brass writing.

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Mahler
Oct 30, 2008

He does the crossword every day.

For non-minimalist modern, I'd suggest you check out the 7 solos for Orchestra by Dusapin. Lots of interesting stuff going on in these pieces!

Here's one of them: "clam" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gvhs_TVPQRY

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