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thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


The broadcast compressor preset in Audition is what I use, with an identical preset with a lower volume output for recordings that came out a little too hot for the full compressor. Is there a similar preset for Audacity?

Bit of EQ can help as well sometimes but if your mics are decent that shouldn't need playing with.

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Jick Magger
Dec 27, 2005


Grimey Drawer

Just wanted to say a quick thanks to you guys, there was a lot of helpful info in this thread, it really helped us get over ourselves and just start recording.
Anyway, our podcast just went live yesterday. It's basically an excuse for me and a friend to relive some nostalgia and pretend like we're not both turning 30 next year.



Kamehamayhem!
iTunes | RSS | Website | Twitter

Genre
TV/Entertainment

Release Schedule
Weekly

Goons
Jick Magger and falconblade

Description
Kamehamayhem! is the only podcast with a power level high enough to handle all 291 episode of Dragonball Z. Join Andy and Mike on their nostalgic journey through a world full of aliens, talking animals, powering up, and lots of shoulder pads. Each episode of the podcast will cover one episode of the show, continuing until we get to the end or die trying. It's gonna be a hell of a journey.

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


If anyone here wants to record live events with an audience, I had the opportunity to ask an ex-BBC Radio 4 comedy producer about how he does it. He produces the excellent comedy podcast Do The Right Thing. Which I absolutely guarantee will be the funniest thing you've ever heard.

https://www.comedy.co.uk/podcasts/dotherightthing/

It's all in multiple Twitter threads so I can assemble it here if anyone is interested?

PS, will check your podcast out tomorrow! ^^^^

8one6
May 20, 2012

When in doubt, err on the side of Awesome!


Grimey Drawer

thehustler posted:

If anyone here wants to record live events with an audience, I had the opportunity to ask an ex-BBC Radio 4 comedy producer about how he does it. He produces the excellent comedy podcast Do The Right Thing. Which I absolutely guarantee will be the funniest thing you've ever heard.

https://www.comedy.co.uk/podcasts/dotherightthing/

It's all in multiple Twitter threads so I can assemble it here if anyone is interested?

PS, will check your podcast out tomorrow! ^^^^

I would be interested in reading that.

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


8one6 posted:

I would be interested in reading that.

OK, I just collated all of this together in order and added some explanatory notes in square brackets:

I initially asked about recording audience reactions while not getting the feedback possible from mics near PAs and in the middle of the room etc. I am tempted to just stick an extra mic pair on stage at my event pointed at the crowd and behind the PA at my event so I asked about that.

quote:

I use my own mixing desk. Output signal minus audience to house desk. Record signal with audience. So no feedback probs.

That in particular sounded like a great idea if you have the kit to hand. Most of the time you have to use the venue kit, so it may be worth plugging any audience mics into your recorder directly - bypassing the house desk - if you have no second mixing desk.

On the subject of PA bleeding into your audience mics...

quote:

Well, I'm mixing live with good headphones, I do try to just add in enough audience. Inevitable you'll get PA bleed. I used to rec and edit thousands of R4 comedy shows. Do The Right Thing is much more 'live' sounding because you get much more 'room' in the mix.

(Which makes sense, it's a live comedy show with a raucous audience and you want that to come across in the mix)

quote:

BH [Broadcasting House, BBC Radio Theatre] has about 12 audience mics and 12 audience mini speakers in addition to main PA. I think impossible to match that sound with a stereo pair. Even I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue [Classic BBC radio show] shows recorded in theatres [it tours around the country] use 6-8 audience mics.

So they can filter out selected bits of the room to change the tone. Many small mics better than a few big mics. Sounds so obvious now that you think about it...

quote:

Also radio shows the SM [Sound Mixer or Studio Manager, not sure which] is in a different room or in a van outside. I use headphones sitting under a PA speaker! Inevitably a more lo-fi sound overall. But I'm at peace with that. Also what I do in post production v diff to R4 shows... I use much more compression on podcasts. And much harsher EQing.

I found this bit particularly amusing, since I use tons of compression to get that classic bassy overly-loud FM sound and I probably shouldn't. All of my podcasts are recorded with nice Shure SM58s and then I whack the broadcast compressor preset from Audition over the top. I probably mix my average voice levels a bit higher than is recommended because I want it to stand out more and have some punch.

Kinda tempted to not do that so much but I think it's a good thing because of where people listen to podcasts in noisy environments etc.

Anyway, would love to hear people's thoughts on this topic or anything to do with processing/EQ/etc.

Here's an example of Ben's work (I just picked a random episode): http://feeds.soundcloud.com/stream/...isode-06-01.mp3

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


Jick Magger posted:




Kamehamayhem!

Oki doki, the subject matter isn't for me but technically, not too bad. May be worth EQing a bit of bottom end onto the vocal tracks though, they sound a little tinny.

Good job though.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Anyone got advice on doing a podcast without being in the same room as my cohost? Should we not bother (is it gonna sound terrible no matter what?)

What should we use? I've listened to some podcasts where a guest is using Skype and it sounds like absolute garbage.

King Lou
Jun 3, 2004
They say the fittest shall survive, yet the unfit may live



ravenkult posted:

Anyone got advice on doing a podcast without being in the same room as my cohost? Should we not bother (is it gonna sound terrible no matter what?)

What should we use? I've listened to some podcasts where a guest is using Skype and it sounds like absolute garbage.

Record the tracks locally and marry them later. That's what I've done on plenty of podcasts where people are remote.

Jick Magger
Dec 27, 2005


Grimey Drawer

thehustler posted:

Oki doki, the subject matter isn't for me but technically, not too bad. May be worth EQing a bit of bottom end onto the vocal tracks though, they sound a little tinny.

Good job though.

Thanks for the feedback.

So you're saying they need a little more bass to them? They're recorded on lovely headset mics so I'm not surprised to hear they sound kinda tinny. I'll play around with it a bit.

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


King Lou posted:

Record the tracks locally and marry them later. That's what I've done on plenty of podcasts where people are remote.

This is the best thing to do. They used to do television like this in Australia before the cities were linked up.

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


Jick Magger posted:

Thanks for the feedback.

So you're saying they need a little more bass to them? They're recorded on lovely headset mics so I'm not surprised to hear they sound kinda tinny. I'll play around with it a bit.

Aye basically. Headset mics are very bad for that. Just a bit of light EQ on the low frequencies, don't go too nuts

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


Hoping to revive this thread. How are we all doing? Are our listening stats going up? Any lessons learnt?

I'm going from 100-120 per episode in the first week to 150-200. And I'm at 17,000 total downloads now. That's a lot of episodes though so maybe not that good a tally...

Lots of things I've done though to improve it. We put our podcast details on our flyers for our events and we announce it at our events too. Also we've done some interviews and guest spots on similar podcasts and that always gets us a bump.

Still wishing I could make a breakthrough though. Our podcast is pretty niche I guess.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast...d988018626?mt=2

8one6
May 20, 2012

When in doubt, err on the side of Awesome!


Grimey Drawer

thehustler posted:

...
Still wishing I could make a breakthrough though. Our podcast is pretty niche I guess.
...

Yeah. Our numbers on UnderDiscussion are holding steady at 150-200 per episode. We're not niche enough to get the dedicated game system listeners and we're not famous so we can't really bump it up by being just a geek culture podcast either.

Not that I'm complaining. I love the listeners we do have and they apparently love us. All of the ones I've talked to have mentioned how they love our rambly, conversational style.

Over Memorial Day weekend we're actually putting on a gaming convention with our sister podcast Preferred Enemies here in KC. UnderCon. We've been running the gaming at a local sci-fi con for a few years now, but breaking the gaming off into its own convention will give us a lot more flexibility in promoting the gaming (and let us give out free badges to the game masters like every other gaming con under the sun.)

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


That sounds cool do let us know how it goes.

I'm working on something really cool. I'm doing a Radio 4-style comedy panel show all about skepticism and science etc. Like a low-rent QI for the radio. We'll have comedians on and famous skeptic and science types which will hopefully draw in the crowns and I think I have the tech all sorted out:

1 mixer sending to my zoom H5 in mono
5x sm58 mics for the talent
A shotgun mic plugged directly plugged into the H5 so it doesn't come out of the PA.
Multitrack record so I can adjust both later.

I'm hoping to shoot for the moon with the gusts and maybe make the podcast as good as Do The Right Thing. We'll see. I got inspired after talking to that Radio 4 engineer

8one6
May 20, 2012

When in doubt, err on the side of Awesome!


Grimey Drawer

thehustler posted:

That sounds cool do let us know how it goes.

I'm working on something really cool. I'm doing a Radio 4-style comedy panel show all about skepticism and science etc. Like a low-rent QI for the radio. We'll have comedians on and famous skeptic and science types which will hopefully draw in the crowns and I think I have the tech all sorted out:

1 mixer sending to my zoom H5 in mono
5x sm58 mics for the talent
A shotgun mic plugged directly plugged into the H5 so it doesn't come out of the PA.
Multitrack record so I can adjust both later.

I'm hoping to shoot for the moon with the gusts and maybe make the podcast as good as Do The Right Thing. We'll see. I got inspired after talking to that Radio 4 engineer

Nice!

Rabble
Dec 3, 2005



Pillbug

A friend and I were watching poorly rated movies on netflix and decided to make a podcast out of it. $50 later and I own the domain Bad Netflix for 5 years...



BadNetflix
iTunes | Website | Facebook

Genre
Movies

Release Schedule
Weekly

Goons
Rabble

Description
Once a week we talk about a movie that's rated less than three stars on Netflix. It's a real freeform structure; which just means we have no idea what we are doing, don't plan or edit, and talk over each other constantly. At the end we come up with a drinking game, which is the one area of the podcast I think is actually getting better.

What I need
We're not really looking to do this for profit or anything, just a fun side hobby. But it would be nice if I could finally get a set-up that didn't make it sound like amateur hour.

My current set-up is:
Behringer B-1 Condenser Mic (new for the last podcast...judge dredd)
Behringer 302usb mixer
Apple Garageband
2x over the ear headphones and splitter (so we can hear our voices)

All of this is set up in my living room, on the coffee table. I'm planning on getting a second mic eventually but that would require me to get a mixer with 2+ mic ports that can output to USB...those aren't exactly cheap. I'm not sure what to do, any advice would be appreciated.

codyclarke
Jan 10, 2006

IDIOT SOUP

Rabble posted:

Once a week we talk about a movie that's rated less than three stars on Netflix.

Not sure if you already know this, but the star ratings that appear on Netflix are based on your own taste as determined by other films or shows you've rated on there, not based on all ratings the film or show has received. So, they aren't necessarily poorly-rated films or shows, Netflix just doesn't think you'll like them.

Sounds like a fun premise for a show though, and I wish you success with it!

Rabble
Dec 3, 2005



Pillbug

codyclarke posted:

Not sure if you already know this, but the star ratings that appear on Netflix are based on your own taste as determined by other films or shows you've rated on there, not based on all ratings the film or show has received. So, they aren't necessarily poorly-rated films or shows, Netflix just doesn't think you'll like them.

Sounds like a fun premise for a show though, and I wish you success with it!

Yeah I heard that this was the case. I'm using a blank profile without rating anything so hopefully I'm getting base ratings...who knows. However, I can confirm that the movies we watch are pretty drat bad.

Rabble fucked around with this message at 20:04 on Dec 6, 2016

dogmother1776
Apr 16, 2016





THE TIMEBAT SHOW
Website | iTunes | Twitter | RSS

Genre
Talk, Comedy, Question/Answer

Release Schedule
Weekly

Goons
dogmother1776

Description
Me and my longtime friend are doing a podcast. I think we have interesting and funny ideas sometimes.

dogmother1776 fucked around with this message at 19:57 on Dec 9, 2016

mincedgarlic
Jan 4, 2005

I've been blown up, take me to the hospital.


I'm hoping this thread is best place to ask this question...

My daughter and I are working on starting a podcast. Thus far I've been doing some sample recordings and have been playing with Audacity and Garageband to see which I prefer. I have 2016 MacBook Pro and a gaming PC as far as hardware is concerned. My preference would be to mix/edit on the Mac if possible. I was hoping to use two USB mics by creating an Aggregate audio device on the Mac and almost immediately I ran in to an issue. We have to Blue mics and because both have the same 'fingerprint', OSX only recognizes one. Thus, you can't aggregate for two mic recording. Blue has acknowledged this issue and you can send one mic in to them to be reprogrammed or something like that but that seems like a bridge too far.

So, before I consider buying another brand USB mic, I'm thinking I should just bite the bullet and get an XLR mic setup. I'm anticipating have 2 - 3 people recording at most and was hoping someone could recommend some affordable hardware. I've read quite a bit and from what I can tell I will need a mixer, USB interface and mics of course. There are some packages like this on Amazon but $89 seems too cheap.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...pf_rd_i=desktop

Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. We're just wading in to this hobby so I don't necessarily want to go full on pro gear but I also don't want something that's going to sound cheap or significantly limit what we can do.

SwitchbladeKult
Apr 4, 2012



"The warmth of life has entered my tomb!"


mincedgarlic posted:

I'm hoping this thread is best place to ask this question...

My daughter and I are working on starting a podcast. Thus far I've been doing some sample recordings and have been playing with Audacity and Garageband to see which I prefer. I have 2016 MacBook Pro and a gaming PC as far as hardware is concerned. My preference would be to mix/edit on the Mac if possible. I was hoping to use two USB mics by creating an Aggregate audio device on the Mac and almost immediately I ran in to an issue. We have to Blue mics and because both have the same 'fingerprint', OSX only recognizes one. Thus, you can't aggregate for two mic recording. Blue has acknowledged this issue and you can send one mic in to them to be reprogrammed or something like that but that seems like a bridge too far.

So, before I consider buying another brand USB mic, I'm thinking I should just bite the bullet and get an XLR mic setup. I'm anticipating have 2 - 3 people recording at most and was hoping someone could recommend some affordable hardware. I've read quite a bit and from what I can tell I will need a mixer, USB interface and mics of course. There are some packages like this on Amazon but $89 seems too cheap.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...pf_rd_i=desktop

Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. We're just wading in to this hobby so I don't necessarily want to go full on pro gear but I also don't want something that's going to sound cheap or significantly limit what we can do.

The VO thread has a lot of good information in the OP. While it's targeted at doing voice work a lot of it is just good general audio recording advice.

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3461287

klapman
Aug 27, 2012

this char is good


My friends and I have been running a podcast over at https://soundcloud.com/shareware-316798169 for almost a year now, though we can't boast even 30 listeners per episode on average. We have a steady base, so I'm confident that our content is at least good enough to keep people around, but getting our name out there is proving a little difficult. Do you guys have any tips on how to boost the signal or however you want to phrase it? We're on iTunes, we've got an RSS feed, we even have a Stitcher and I don't know what that is.

For those interested in giving it a listen, we basically choose one game every "Season" to dissect piece by piece, doing one segment of the game per week. We also have an introductory part of the show that's more generally appealing, where we all come up with one gaming-related topic and talk about it. We have two near constant hosts, Josh and myself, with an almost constantly rotating third chair.

Here are the games we've done so far:

Event[0] - Recommended for first time listening
Max Payne 3
Oxenfree
The Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay
Uplink
Dark Messiah of Might and Magic
Inside
Deus Ex: Human Revolution
A Story About My Uncle
Binary Domain
Cibele (this one really sucked honestly)
Jet Set Radio
The Graveyard
Alpha Protocol - Also recommended for first time listening, Episode 11 is probably our funniest
Ori and the Blind Forest
Mirror's Edge
Enslaved: Odyssey to the West

I've been going around doing a little bit of shilling and so has Josh, but it doesn't seem to be giving us huge returns, really. Should we shell out for advertisements, or is there a better alternative?

codyclarke
Jan 10, 2006

IDIOT SOUP

klapman posted:

My friends and I have been running a podcast over at https://soundcloud.com/shareware-316798169 for almost a year now, though we can't boast even 30 listeners per episode on average. We have a steady base, so I'm confident that our content is at least good enough to keep people around, but getting our name out there is proving a little difficult. Do you guys have any tips on how to boost the signal or however you want to phrase it? We're on iTunes, we've got an RSS feed, we even have a Stitcher and I don't know what that is.

The audio quality of your podcast is quite low. That you have even 30 listeners per episode is great, actually. That means you have 30 diehards who don't care about your low production values. That's a solid base. But if you want to start expanding and reaching more people, the best thing you can do is create a more listenable podcast. You'll have a much easier time getting new listeners that way.

If you don't already have one, I'd say start a Patreon and see if any your 30 listeners want to throw a couple bucks your way so you have money for better equipment. Plug the Patreon every episode. Even if you only raise like $30 a month, that's $360 you'd have towards equipment that you didn't have before.

Best of luck!

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


Best thing to do that I've found is market directly to groups that deal in what your podcast is about, and also make some relationships with other podcasts in the same genre/field.

mincedgarlic
Jan 4, 2005

I've been blown up, take me to the hospital.


codyclarke posted:

The audio quality of your podcast is quite low. That you have even 30 listeners per episode is great, actually. That means you have 30 diehards who don't care about your low production values.

Could you possibly expand more on this? I gave the show a listen and while I didn't go through a whole episode, the audio didn't seem terrible. I'm asking because I'm in the process of getting a podcast off the ground as a hobby and our first episode sounded somewhat similar to this from an audio standpoint. I tried using USB mics as a way of wading in to the hobby but it seemed to be more hassle than it was worth for multiple hosts. I ended up buying a a couple of dynamic mics and a Behringer Xenyx 1204 USB mixer. I have a long way to go in terms of understanding how to use the mixer properly and how to edit the sound quality in Garageband.

Anyway, I would be interested in reading more detailed thoughts on where you thought the quality needed help.

klapman posted:

My friends and I have been running a podcast over at...

Started listening to episode 11 and you guys seem to enjoy talking to each other, which is good! Will finish the rest tonight.

codyclarke
Jan 10, 2006

IDIOT SOUP

mincedgarlic posted:

Could you possibly expand more on this?

People like to listen to stuff that sounds good. It's kinda like how a crappy pop song with amazing production values can become a hit. A more relatable example, at least for me: I have absolutely no interest in cars, but I've seen over a hundred episodes of Top Gear, because I really like how the show is produced, and the dynamic of the hosts.

The best thing a niche podcast can do is sound really good. For one, it puts you ahead of sometimes literally all of your competition within your niche, or at least most. If you're a knitting podcast, for example, and the big knitting podcast sounds like garbage but has a lot of listeners, if you have the host as a guest on an episode of your podcast and your podcast is better audio quality than theirs, you're gonna grab a LOT of their listeners. WAY more than if your podcast has similar audio quality or worse than theirs. People crave things that sound good.

The great thing about podcasting is that it doesn't actually cost that much to up production values. Sometimes your main competition is literally just a bunch of guys sitting vaguely near one microphone, and they do no editing or processing whatsoever. In a case like that, simply buying designated microphones (even $20 ones) for the people on your show and a mixer can put you way ahead of the pack. Think of it like this: what other medium can you be instantly ahead of almost ALL your competition, production values-wise, simply by spending $500 or so? It's insane, it's unheard of. There's no excuse for a podcast to not sound incredible. And yet so few beef up their production values.

Equipment I swear by, to get people started:
- MDX4600 (cuts down on background noise, makes any mic sound way better)
- MDR1064 (inexpensive mixer that doesn't sacrifice useful stuff like inserts for the channels)
- literally any $15+ dynamic cardioid mic with 4 1/2 stars or more on Amazon (they're all good when used in combo with an MDX4600)
- Tascam DR-05 (cheapest portable audio recorder, just as good as $100 or $150 ones)

codyclarke fucked around with this message at 07:02 on Jan 14, 2017

klapman
Aug 27, 2012

this char is good


Wow, thanks a ton for the links! You've definitely started a lot of fevered discussion on our part, especially with the Patreon idea. We were making jokes about it when we first started, but now that we've been at it almost a year it might be worth giving it a shot. We've been thinking up tiers, poster possibilities, etc. We're also looking at that equipment now - the costs are making our wallets scream, but I think we're invested enough at this point to go for it if we can get a little help from our fans.

As for the post production end of things, I'd like to think we're making the best of it. We have a 100$ Yeti we're making do with, and do roughly 90 minutes to two hours of editing per episode. Sometimes, like the Event[0] episode, there's just very little we can do because of external factors, unfortunately. We used to record at my place, but my computer blue screened after we recorded one episode and we had to do the whole thing over - that really put a sour note on my place as a recording spot.

One thing that Josh suggested when I mentioned I posted in this thread was asking how you guys handle listener participation. We've managed to scrounge together some in the time we've been doing it, but a big part of what we want the Game Club to be involves people writing in with their own takes on whatever game we're playing, and despite fairly aggressive shilling it's proven hard to come by. Do you guys know of any subtle, elegant ways to get more people watching? So far we've been doing giveaways, reading listener emails, and posting on popular forums for the games we play.

mincedgarlic posted:

Started listening to episode 11 and you guys seem to enjoy talking to each other, which is good! Will finish the rest tonight.

Cool, hope you like it. Feel free to hit us with some criticism - even though it's been a while since then and we've improved quite a bit, it's still enough of a standout episode that any criticism would still be more than valid.

codyclarke
Jan 10, 2006

IDIOT SOUP

klapman posted:

One thing that Josh suggested when I mentioned I posted in this thread was asking how you guys handle listener participation. We've managed to scrounge together some in the time we've been doing it, but a big part of what we want the Game Club to be involves people writing in with their own takes on whatever game we're playing, and despite fairly aggressive shilling it's proven hard to come by. Do you guys know of any subtle, elegant ways to get more people watching? So far we've been doing giveaways, reading listener emails, and posting on popular forums for the games we play.

With Smug Film we tried having a Skype phone number people could call from their phones or from Skype and leave voicemails with questions/comments that we'd play on the show. Worked out pretty well, but a problem we ran into was that we often had the same people calling over and over, because I think a lot of our fans were nervous to call in and have their voice heard on the show. Leaving voicemails in general is awkward for most people, let alone knowing a lot of people will hear it. It was $60 a year for the phone number, which our Patreon covered (as well as all our site costs), but I don't know that we'd do it again. However, having that call-in number did save our rear end on two separate occasions when we had high-profile guests that we could only get on the show via phone, not Skype.

If you have a particularly charismatic or animatedly voiced guy in your group, I'd say every episode encourage people to write in with questions or comments, and he can read them. They'd probably be interested in doing so so they can hear said guy read their words. Maybe even ask a special question at the end of each episode, so they have a topic for their comments.

GIveaways I've never had any luck with whatsoever. We've given away DVD's, signed merch, etc. and I'm always flabbergasted by how few people enter into the drawings. They assume they have a 1 in 1000 or whatever shot of winning, but based on people that would actually put their name in the hat, they often really had like a 1 in 5 shot. It was really that few.

Are there are any people related to the games you talk about on the show that you could have on? Maybe some programmers or designers? It's a lot easier to get people to listen to the show if you say 'hey, you might like this episode, we had [guy you people like] on' rather than 'hey, you might like me and my friends' podcast'. But, make sure the interview will actually sound good. Have the kinks all worked out with equipment.

Another important think to remember is that podcasting is like the greatest networking tool around. If you ask somebody established in your niche if they wanna meet up and talk for an hour, you'll never get a response. But if you ask them to be on your podcast, more often than not they're gonna say yes. Do that over and over with tons of people within your niche and suddenly you're associated with or even friends with all these people you were once just fans of. It's incredible. Forget booze—podcasting is the new best social lubricant.

codyclarke fucked around with this message at 07:30 on Jan 14, 2017

mincedgarlic
Jan 4, 2005

I've been blown up, take me to the hospital.


Thanks codyclarke for all of the helpful input.

One rookie mixer question I'm trying to tackle is separating mics on to individual tracks. I'm not sure I need to do this for my purposes with two hosts but it seems like I should have the capability if I need to edit the commentary of one host. I'm using a mixer with a USB interface connected to my Macbook w/Garageband. I have two XLR mics connected to the mixer. In the Audio/Midi settings, the mixer appears as one device and thus anything coming in through is recorded on to one audio track. This may be how it's supposed to work but I was under the impression that I could record the mics each as an independent track in the software simultaneously. I've scoured the net and found a few suggestions about panning the mics hard left/right to send them to separate tracks but haven't had success. It seems like as long at the mixer is recognized by OS X & Garageband as one input, than it = one track.

I feel like I missing something elementary here. Any suggestions?

codyclarke
Jan 10, 2006

IDIOT SOUP

mincedgarlic posted:

Thanks codyclarke for all of the helpful input.

One rookie mixer question I'm trying to tackle is separating mics on to individual tracks. I'm not sure I need to do this for my purposes with two hosts but it seems like I should have the capability if I need to edit the commentary of one host. I'm using a mixer with a USB interface connected to my Macbook w/Garageband. I have two XLR mics connected to the mixer. In the Audio/Midi settings, the mixer appears as one device and thus anything coming in through is recorded on to one audio track. This may be how it's supposed to work but I was under the impression that I could record the mics each as an independent track in the software simultaneously. I've scoured the net and found a few suggestions about panning the mics hard left/right to send them to separate tracks but haven't had success. It seems like as long at the mixer is recognized by OS X & Garageband as one input, than it = one track.

I feel like I missing something elementary here. Any suggestions?

This is a bit out of my expertise (I record mono to a portable audio recorder) but I'm pretty sure that if you need each voice to be a separate track, you need a USB audio interface rather than a mixer, with enough channels for each person. I think that's overkill though—that's more what you'd need if you were a musician recording separate instruments at once. For what is essentially talk radio you really only need mono. I've had no problem editing out certain things said in post. Just try and keep crosstalk to a minimum, that'll make it easier. And encourage people to pause here and there, rather than feel the need to fill every possible moment with speaking. It's really easy to just cut dead air out in post since it's very visible when you look at the waveform. And no one will ever know. For instance: one of my podcast guests spoke with really long pauses every couple words. I cut most of them out in post because they ruined the pace of the show and made the episode like 20 minutes longer and the content seem way boring. Anyone listening to the finished episode would think he was the most articulate dude they ever heard in their life. He sounded incredible.

thehustler
Apr 17, 2004

I am very curious about this little crescendo


Pan one L and one R? Ghetto multitrack. Fix in post.

mincedgarlic
Jan 4, 2005

I've been blown up, take me to the hospital.


codyclarke posted:

This is a bit out of my expertise (I record mono to a portable audio recorder) but I'm pretty sure that if you need each voice to be a separate track, you need a USB audio interface rather than a mixer, with enough channels for each person. I think that's overkill though—that's more what you'd need if you were a musician recording separate instruments at once. For what is essentially talk radio you really only need mono. I've had no problem editing out certain things said in post. Just try and keep crosstalk to a minimum, that'll make it easier. And encourage people to pause here and there, rather than feel the need to fill every possible moment with speaking. It's really easy to just cut dead air out in post since it's very visible when you look at the waveform. And no one will ever know. For instance: one of my podcast guests spoke with really long pauses every couple words. I cut most of them out in post because they ruined the pace of the show and made the episode like 20 minutes longer and the content seem way boring. Anyone listening to the finished episode would think he was the most articulate dude they ever heard in their life. He sounded incredible.


thehustler posted:

Pan one L and one R? Ghetto multitrack. Fix in post.

Appreciate the suggestions. I think I'm going to stick to using one track until I get more comfortable with the hardware. To the points above, my editing needs aren't really that broad yet. I had originally planned on just buying a USB interface to enable the usage of XLR mics. I ended up getting a mixer w/a USB interface because of what I read about including guests via Skype. I spent a good few hours last night watching videos and at least the board looks less like a airplane cockpit now.

SwitchbladeKult
Apr 4, 2012



"The warmth of life has entered my tomb!"


thehustler posted:

Best thing to do that I've found is market directly to groups that deal in what your podcast is about, and also make some relationships with other podcasts in the same genre/field.

What is the best way to do this? I'm considering starting up podcasting again and would love to attract more than a handful of listeners.

8one6
May 20, 2012

When in doubt, err on the side of Awesome!


Grimey Drawer

SwitchbladeKult posted:

What is the best way to do this? I'm considering starting up podcasting again and would love to attract more than a handful of listeners.

Just record an episode or two and then just ask other podcasters to give it a listen. Most of the podcasting community is really friendly.

SwitchbladeKult
Apr 4, 2012



"The warmth of life has entered my tomb!"


8one6 posted:

Just record an episode or two and then just ask other podcasters to give it a listen. Most of the podcasting community is really friendly.

What is the best way to connect with other podcasters?

codyclarke
Jan 10, 2006

IDIOT SOUP

SwitchbladeKult posted:

What is the best way to connect with other podcasters?

Within whatever your niche is, 99.9% of them will have a twitter account for their podcast. So just search around on twitter, or first go on iTunes and find names of podcasts within your niche and then find their twitter.

Then follow them, and most will follow back since they usually follow back anyone who follows them (since it's just an account for their pod). When they do that you can DM them.

The best thing to say is something along the lines of 'hey, really dig your podcast, would love to have you guys on mine and vice versa, cross-promotion, blah blah blah'. But don't just say all that arbitrarily, actually familiarize yourself with what they do.

You can also just email them obviously, but I find that people are slower to email back than they are to respond to things on twitter.

The idea here is that their fans will hear your podcast, and vice versa. If your podcast has better audio quality than theirs and you're entertaining, you'll definitely get some of their fans to subscribe to yours. People are on an endless pursuit (that they are often not even conscious of being on) for better-sounding podcasts to listen to.

codyclarke fucked around with this message at 21:47 on Jan 16, 2017

SwitchbladeKult
Apr 4, 2012



"The warmth of life has entered my tomb!"


codyclarke posted:

Within whatever your niche is, 99.9% of them will have a twitter account for their podcast. So just search around on twitter, or first go on iTunes and find names of podcasts within your niche and then find their twitter.

Then follow them, and most will follow back since they usually follow back anyone who follows them (since it's just an account for their pod). When they do that you can DM them.

The best thing to say is something along the lines of 'hey, really dig your podcast, would love to have you guys on mine and vice versa, cross-promotion, blah blah blah'. But don't just say all that arbitrarily, actually familiarize yourself with what they do.

You can also just email them obviously, but I find that people are slower to email back than they are to respond to things on twitter.

The idea here is that their fans will hear your podcast, and vice versa. If your podcast has better audio quality than theirs and you're entertaining, you'll definitely get some of their fans to subscribe to yours. People are on an endless pursuit (that they are often not even conscious of being on) for better-sounding podcasts to listen to.

Awesome! Thank you! I guess time to start a twitter account.

DIEGETIC SPACEMAN
Feb 25, 2007

fuck a car
i'll do a mothafuckin' walk-by


I'm getting into the amateur podcast production business, because I have friends with nice mics who like to talk a lot but don't know jack about audio. Given the fact that I'm not actually doing this for myself and am not getting paid for it, does GarageBand do anything better/easier than Audacity that would be worth my $5? Or would I only really see a difference if I invested in something like Audition, Logic or Reaper? (Which I'm not going to do, because I'm not that nice of a friend.)

HOT! New Memes
May 31, 2006




What would be the best way to find a short (15-20 second) intro music for a podcast? I found a f few sites that offer free intros but nothing fits what I'm looking for. I wouldn't mind paying if I could find the right one but I'm not sure where to begin looking

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codyclarke
Jan 10, 2006

IDIOT SOUP

HOT! New Memes posted:

What would be the best way to find a short (15-20 second) intro music for a podcast? I found a f few sites that offer free intros but nothing fits what I'm looking for. I wouldn't mind paying if I could find the right one but I'm not sure where to begin looking

You've probably already been on here if you've been googling around, but I've found great stuff on here: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/

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