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elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


YES, WE KNOW THE STORY OF THE loving POLISH WWII BEAR

Thank you.


-----------------------------------



I love history, I love random facts, I love just sperging through wikipedia. You know what it's like to read stuff on wikipedia though, you start with an interesting topic and a few hours and numerous clicks later you end up at a weird article that you think is totally made up. Take for example the article about the franco-prussian war of 1870, wich brought me to Strasbourg which brought me to this article:

Dancing_Plague_of_1518

Yes, you didn't misread that, the dancing plague of 1518.

quote:

The Dancing Plague (or Dance Epidemic) of 1518 was a case of dancing mania that occurred in Strasbourg, France (then part of the Holy Roman Empire) in July 1518. Numerous people took to dancing for days without rest, and, over the period of about one month, some of the people died from heart attack, stroke, or exhaustion.

Now, I don't know about you, but I've never heard of that before and at first I thought this has to be made up, but it looks legit.

What other strange but true historical events have you found through wikipedia or whatever that you couldn't believe really happened?

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elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


In the same vein as the dancing plague:


Tanganyika laughter epidemic


The Tanganyika laughter epidemic of 1962 was an outbreak of mass hysteria, or Mass Psychogenic Illness (MPI), rumored to have occurred in or near the village of Kashasha on the western coast of Lake Victoria in the modern nation of Tanzania (formerly Tanganyika) near the border of Kenya.

The laughter epidemic began on January 30, 1962, at a mission-run boarding school for girls in Kashasha. The laughter started with three girls and spread haphazardly throughout the school, affecting 95 of the 159 pupils, aged 12–18. Symptoms lasted from a few hours to 16 days in those affected.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadaver_Synod

The Cadaver Synod is the name commonly given to the posthumous ecclesiastical trial of Catholic Pope Formosus, held in the Basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome during January of 897.

Before the proceedings the body of Formosus was exhumed and, according to some sources, seated on a throne while his successor, Pope Stephen (VI) VII, read the charges against him (of which Formosus was found guilty) and conducted the trial.


Click here for the full 702x531 image.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pig_War

The Pig War was a confrontation in 1859 between the United States and the British Empire over the boundary between the US and British North America. The specific area in dispute was the San Juan Islands, which lie between Vancouver Island and the North American mainland. The Pig War, so called because it was triggered by the shooting of a pig, is also called the Pig Episode, the Pig and Potato War, the San Juan Boundary Dispute or the Northwestern Boundary Dispute. The pig was the only casualty of the war, making the dispute otherwise bloodless.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


Did you know that not only is the german autobahn awesome for not having a general speed limit (sadly there are more and more temporary limits), but also that large parts are build as makeshift landing strips for military aircrafts and temporary airports?



At the end of ww2 and during the cold war parts of the autobahn were build in a way that they could be transformed to airfields within 24 hours. A power network was installed during construction of the autobahn, a mobile tower and mobile radar where always nearby and the divider between the lanes could be dismantled within hours. If you drive along the autobahn and you come to large straight parts without concrete barriers between the central reservation and two big rest areas on each end, chances are that that is an old emergency airfield.

link (in german)

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


You know you live in a country formerly divided by the iron curtain when street signs like this are still found all over the place in the country:

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


seems not to work, so another try

Only registered members can see post attachments!

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


It's a sign in front of bridges. If there is oncoming traffic you are only allowed to cross the bridge if your vehicle does not exceed 30 tonnes (trucks) or 30 tonnes (tracked vehicles like tanks). Without oncoming traffic obviously 90 respectively 70 tonnes.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


Nessus posted:

Does anyone know more about the history of the German welfare state? I remember hearing broadly that Bismarck implemented it, more or less by his supreme mustache fiat, because he wanted to cut the socialists off at the dick.

A good start is the wikipedia article on Bismarck:


Health Insurance Bill of 1883

The first bill that had success was the Health Insurance bill, which was passed in 1883. The program was considered the least important from Bismarck’s point of view, and the least politically troublesome. The program was established to provide health care for the largest segment of the German workers. The health service was established on a local basis, with the cost divided between employers and the employed. The employers contributed 1/3rd, while the workers contributed 2/3rds . The minimum payments for medical treatment and Sick Pay for up to 13 weeks were legally fixed. The individual local health bureaus were administered by a committee elected by the members of each bureau, and this move had the unintended effect of establishing a majority representation for the workers on account of their large financial contribution. This worked to the advantage of the Social Democrats who – through heavy Worker membership – achieved their first small foothold in public administration.


Accident Insurance Bill of 1884

Bismarck’s government had to submit three draft bills before they could get one passed by the Reichstag in 1884. Bismarck had originally proposed that the Federal Government pay a portion of the Accident Insurance contribution. Bismarck’s motive was a demonstration of the willingness of the German government to lessen the hardship experienced by the German workers as a means of weaning them away from the various left-wing parties, most importantly the Social Democrats. The National Liberals took this program to be an expression of State Socialism, which they were dead set against. The Center party was afraid of the expansion of Federal Power at the expense of States Rights. As a result, the only way the program could be passed at all was for the entire expense to be underwritten by the Employers. To facilitate this, Bismarck arranged for the administration of this program to be placed in the hands of “Der Arbeitgeberverband in den beruflichen Korporationen”, which translates as “The organization of employers in occupational corporations”. This organization established central and bureaucratic insurance offices on the Federal, and in some cases the State level to perform the actual administration. The program kicked in to replace the health insurance program as of the 14th week. It paid for medical treatment and a Pension of up to 2/3rds of earned wages if the worker was fully disabled. This program was expanded in 1886 to include Agricultural workers.

Old Age and Disability Insurance Bill of 1889

The Old Age Pension program, financed by a tax on workers, was designed to provide a pension annuity for workers who reached the age of 65 years. At the time, the life expectancy for the average Prussian was 45 years. Unlike the Accident Insurance and Health Insurance programs, this program covered Industrial, Agrarian, Artisans and Servants from the start. Also, unlike the other two programs, the principle that the Federal Government should contribute a portion of the underwriting cost, with the other two portions prorated accordingly, was accepted without question. The Disability Insurance program was intended to be used by those permanently disabled. This time, the State or Province supervised the programs directly.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


bamhand posted:

I thought there were tons of historical accounts of battles where knights would fall over and be unable to get up due to the weight of their armor?

Barbarossa

However, on 10 June 1190, Emperor Frederick drowned in the Saleph river as he was striding on his horse across the rocky waters.; Arab historians report that his servants had encamped before the river, and that the Emperor had gone to the river to drink and bathe, however, he forgot to take his armor off and he was carried away by the currents underwater and then he died. Some of Frederick's men put him in a barrel of vinegar to preserve his body.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


Hungry Gerbil posted:


Even wearing this symbol as a badge is verboten:



No, it's not.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


If someone wants to do a list of covered topics with links to the posts, I'll gladly post them in the op, but honestly it's a shitload of work.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


Kurtofan posted:

Yeah that happens occasionally , I live in a town that was razed to the ground during WWII and they found four war engines,including a 500 kg bomb(don't know much about bombs but that seems a lot) and had to evacuate the town each time.

Whenever there is (deep) roadwork in the city centre where I work, they usually find a ww2 bomb and have to evacuate.

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


FrozenVent posted:

Two weeks and eight pages.

Can we change the title to "History: YES, WE KNOW ABOUT THE loving BEAR"?


Do you know about Loukanikos, the greek protest bear...ahem dog?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-13802940

elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


SeanBeansShako posted:


German militarism is certainly dead and buried deep.

As a former conscript in the german Bundeswehr, it was rather pointless.

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elwood
Mar 28, 2001

by Smythe


And where would bums and hipsters get their old german bundeswehr parkas then eh?

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