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dyne
May 9, 2003
[blank]

How does that wrench work? The handle ratchets and closes the jaw? Looks pretty neat and I would love to have a replacement for my standard adjustable wrench (which I hate)

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Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



artificialj posted:

Bought a 3 lb. cross peen hammer there the other day. Was drawing out some steel, and on the 6th hit on the anvil the epoxy holding the head to the handle broke. I mean, I know all I need is to actually put a wedge in there, but why the hell wouldn't it already have one? Who just glues a hammer head on a handle with cheap glue?

On the up side, the hammer was only like $5...

The exact same thing happened to me, except the hammer was from House of Tools (a theoretically reputable dealer) and it cost me 20 bucks. The handle was only half inserted into the hafting hole and there was a 3/4" plug of epoxy on top.


I made it better though.



Also why don't you post in the blacksmith thread dammit?

Ampersand-e
Feb 25, 2007

Cinders and ashes bitch!
Yes Im fucking cross!


Everyone go do something really nice for your friends right now! Being recently divorced my ex got what friends I thought I had and while we were married we moved away from every one I know and somehow after being married for five years I am retarded around people now. Value your friends because work friends are only friends at work.

I'm trying to assemble my Ridgid R4512 and you have to be a body builder to assemble it yourself. Man, I suck.

artificialj
Aug 17, 2004

You're the gourmet around here, Eddie.


Slung Blade posted:

The exact same thing happened to me, except the hammer was from House of Tools (a theoretically reputable dealer) and it cost me 20 bucks. The handle was only half inserted into the hafting hole and there was a 3/4" plug of epoxy on top.


I made it better though.



Also why don't you post in the blacksmith thread dammit?

Yeah, I wish the HF hammer had 3/4 inches of epoxy on top - it was just a paper thin coating with black spray paint on it.

Also, just found the blacksmithing thread last week. Reading through it, only have like 5 pages left to read before I hit the end (I have a compulsive need to read an entire thread before posting in it.) I promise I'll be posting in there soon.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Slung Blade posted:

The exact same thing happened to me, except the hammer was from House of Tools (a theoretically reputable dealer) and it cost me 20 bucks. The handle was only half inserted into the hafting hole and there was a 3/4" plug of epoxy on top.

My HF drilling hammer (actually I may have got it from Northern Tool) was similar. Handle only halfway through, big plug of epoxy that broke. As a stopgap, I stuck the head on the handle upside-down (it fit better that way) to get through the day until I could shave the top of the handle down and fix it properly.

But now I can't get the head back off.


Click here for the full 800x600 image.

Error 404 NpH
Nov 26, 2000



jackyl posted:


[*]2.5 Horsepower 10" Industrial Tile/Brick Saw: Looks like the beefiest one they have, with 18" capability (12" diagonal).


This one is actually a very nice saw for the money. My brother picked one up and bought name brand blades for it for tile and bricks and it kicks rear end. We've done a kitchen, bath, and paver patio. The kitchen and bath were porcelean tiles too, the saw never bogged down just cut through it like butter.

Anubis
Oct 9, 2003

It's hard to keep sand out of ears this big.

Fun Shoe

Delivery McGee posted:

But now I can't get the head back off.

Sounds like it's fixed to me, then!

keykey
Mar 28, 2003

     


dyne posted:

How does that wrench work? The handle ratchets and closes the jaw? Looks pretty neat and I would love to have a replacement for my standard adjustable wrench (which I hate)

The head rotates upward and as it does, it opens further. That's how it's easier to loosen or get things tighter.

iForge
Oct 28, 2010

Apple's new "iBlacksmith Suite: Professional Edition" features the iForge, iAnvil, and the iHammer.

Anubis posted:

Here's something I think most home owners should own. RIDGID Power Spin Drain Gun http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...catalogId=10053

It's such a basic tool that I don't think the brand matters too much, but I really like this little drill attachment that I picked up a couple years ago. It always seems like the clog is a little past the 6' drain snakes and plunging is tiring. With this thing it's pretty straight forward, just put the drill on low and take it fairly slow or else the entire thing will tend to get tangled. Considering a visit from a plumber around here starts at $100 this guy has saved me something like $400 over 5 years between here and my wife's store.

Of course, latex or nylon gloves and safety glasses are highly recommended.

Going to second this. I have never used it on a drill but it is still boss. Much better than any other one that i have owned.

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


Anyone have any insight on http://www.gmctools.com/ ? I don't know anything about the brand and I've never seen it in any of the European webshops. A small Norwegian shop is selling GMC tools quite cheap (guessing for a reason). On the other hand the shop also sells Triton with decent prices so I figured I'd ask.

Thinking of buying one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Triton-SCA001...g/dp/B000CSRD28

Apparently the saw is discontinued as Triton is under new management. I'm thinking of buying a welder and I've always used angle grinders with cutting discs to chop metal. The only thing bothering me is that the miter angles are 90 or 45 degrees only. Maximum cutting size is 2x2".

let it mellow
Jun 1, 2000



Dinosaur Gum

Following up on my tile saw question from earlier, I ended up buying a Kobalt 7" tile saw from Lowes:




Over the weekend, we knocked out a kitchen / pantry / breakfast area with it. Overall, I am very happy with the saw. Assembly was straightforward and quick, calibration was fairly simple, and the stand folds down decently when not in use for storage.

It made all the cuts I needed and worked very well for plunge cuts. There is no way I could go back to a bench style saw after this - those were the easiest floor register and door jamb cut outs I ever had. It also did cut straight, which was the major complaint against the HD competitor. Finally, the measurements marked on the try were to the edge of the saw blade, which was very nice. I did end up using a tape for all intricate cuts just to be certain, but I probably could have gotten away with not doing that. The laser is useless unless maybe you're working at night, but that wasn't a surprise.

There are a couple of negatives, but I didn't consider any of them showstoppers for a $300 tile saw. First, the major complaint on Lowes.com reviews has to do with the stand not being sturdy. I didn't run into an issue with that, but it could definitely be sturdier. Someone else there complained about how the legs are assembled and how that allows water from the tray into them. That is accurate and I'll probably end up siliconing them like he mentions before the next job.

The largest issue is with the pump. The suction cups on it are worthless, so it ends up floating around in the tray, which in turn requires you to fill it with water more often. It also seized up on me once, requiring some small pump disassembly and manually moving the impeller to free what debris was blocking it. I am going to modify the set up a little bit, though, which should solve both of these issues. My plan is to get a 5' or 6' section of the 1/4" tubing the pump uses and just keep clean water in a 5 gallon bucket next to the saw. this should protect the pump and solve the suction cup issue.

I give it a thumbs up as long as you know what you are getting into with a $300 tile saw.

Error 404 NpH
Nov 26, 2000



If you put the pump in a bucket of water you'll overflow the pan. Unless youre just going to keep the tray dry and pump clean water till the bucket is empty, then dump the tray and start over with fresh water

let it mellow
Jun 1, 2000



Dinosaur Gum

Yeah, I was just going to have another bucket underneath the drain hole or occasionally take a cutting break and drain water from the hole back into the original bucket. I rented one a while back and that's how it was set up. It seemed to leave more debris in the tray and allow cleaner (although not completely clean) water only to escape.

Ampersand-e
Feb 25, 2007

Cinders and ashes bitch!
Yes Im fucking cross!



Dust separator lid for a 5 gallon paint bucket.
http://www.amazon.com/Big-Horn-1114...6720086&sr=1-71

I haven't used it enough to tell if it really makes that much of an improvement on vacuum filter life or anything like that, but it does catch any hardware or bits you might accidentally suck up which is nice.

inspire
Nov 24, 2004
Eyyy!

Iskariot posted:

Anyone have any insight on http://www.gmctools.com/ ? I don't know anything about the brand and I've never seen it in any of the European webshops. A small Norwegian shop is selling GMC tools quite cheap (guessing for a reason)
GMC is absolute garbage. I was given a GMC cordless from my stepfather and the batteries last about 10 minutes. Never was game to try anything else from them. You usually get what you pay for but my old boss bought an XU1(?) electric drill for $30 with a 1" chuck and it lasted forever.

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


inspire posted:

GMC is absolute garbage. I was given a GMC cordless from my stepfather and the batteries last about 10 minutes. Never was game to try anything else from them. You usually get what you pay for but my old boss bought an XU1(?) electric drill for $30 with a 1" chuck and it lasted forever.
Yeah, I figured as much based on the price. Still, worth asking.

Ridgid seems to be setting up shop in Europe. Toolstop(.co.uk) is already selling plumbing tools and I'm hoping they will introduce some powertools in the future. More competition can only be good.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Building my addition was a great excuse to buy a lot of new tools. My favorite powertool is my Milwaukee Sawzall- it's like duct tape, in reverse! There's virtually nothing it can't un-do; you just can't beat it for demo work. Clumsier than a jigzall for detail work in new construction, but far more versatile. A very DIY tool. I love my Hitachi 10" laser compound miter saw, too; I hardly ever use my radial arm saw now that I have it. Had to go out and buy a laser skillsaw, too (B&D firestorm).

I keep getting more and more tools; we have the "right tool for the job" now for virtually any job that comes up. (lathe, masonry saw, grinder, hammer drill, dado blade, torque wrench, etc.) I just wish my workshops weren't so cluttered...

As for advice: I've stopped buying cordless tools. I love the portability, but hate that they're worthless in 3 years and the jacked-up cost of replacement batteries seem to always cost more than just buying a new tool. I have one cordless drill left because I liked it enough to solder together a replacement battery pack for it (and lets face it- corded drills are nice for heavy work but a PITA for small jobs); the rest have gone into the garbage.

grover fucked around with this message at 17:06 on Feb 6, 2011

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


Interesting article from the Toolstop blog:

http://www.toolstop.co.uk/blog/2011...lus-mitre-saws/

The earlier Metabo mitre saws where rebranded Elektra Beckum saws and Metabo let some of their saws trail behind in quality and features. You still see these blue Metabo saws sold. They are good options if you're looking for a cheap and easy saw but not up to DW, Bosch, Makita, etc. in quality. I would imagine they out-preform green Bosch, B&D, Skil, etc. simply because they should be more durable.

These new, green Metabos look really nice. The dust extraction is probably the first to rival the omnipotent Kapex (Festool, sell your first-born and so on). No nifty solution to get rid of the long slide but you can't have it all. I'm loving the induction motor model. I'm thinking of trying that out with a Bosch mitre saw. The construction of the 10 and 12" dual-bevel models are just begging to have an induction motor.

Edit: Oh, yeah. This is also interesting: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xayc_0rB3es Not sure how the balancing bit works.

Iskariot fucked around with this message at 12:11 on Feb 11, 2011

GEMorris
Aug 28, 2002

Glory To the Order!


iForge posted:

Ridgid 18 volt cordless power tools ($300 for a set of 3 tools, 2 batteries, and a charger?)
The batteries had a very short life. After only maybe a dozen charge cycles I noticed a significant loss in life in the batteries and now they collect dust and the set is useless. I refuse to buy replacement batteries. My DeWalt batteries have held up 100X longer. Before the batteries were completely useless, the keyless blade release on the reciprocating saw broke and I had to use a screwdriver to change blades. Not recommended.

I just want to add in here that this has not been my experience with this set. I got a deal on them in jan of 2010 when they were clearanced after christmas, but regardless, the drill and impact driver are great. It did come with the low AH batteries, so if you want more runtime, then you need to buy a set with the larger (heavier) batteries. I don't run into much of a problem because Ridgid only makes qucik battery chargers, so I'm not waiting long if ever for charging. The one disappointment is the cordless version of the fuego small-sawzall. It tends to overheat quickly, so the control chip cuts power so there is no threat of lithium battery pack ignition (all lithium ion tools have a chip like this, but most don't overheat as fast as this saw). Regardless the saw still has its uses.

I might have a different opinion on the "value" if I had paid full price. But I'm more than happy with the quality of Ridgid drills and impact drivers.

iForge posted:

No. I believe that I purchased it before they offered that. This was 2005ish that I bought the set.

Nevermind, we have different sets. Also they have always offered the lifetime service agreement/warranty, ever since they started selling Ridgid power tools.

iForge posted:

Ridgid palm sander($60?)
Junk. I managed to destroy one before I had used up the first sheet of sandpaper on it. Evidently, I pushed too hard and locked up the internal mechanism. I have put other power sanders through 5x the abuse and they took it with no problem. I wasn't even pushing THAT HARD on it. Maybe a defective unit, but I will never buy another.

Oh god yes I completely agree, and let me expand this to all sheet sanders sold at the big box stores, they are all terrible. People stare wistfully at festool catalogs, usually eyeing the saws and routers. However IMHO, the most to be gained with a Festool tool over a "regular" tool is in the sanding department. I use a finish sander for hours on end, day after day during the busy season for my business. I went through three of the ridgid sanders in one year. The balance and vibration would get so bad that the clamps for holding sandpaper on could no longer do their jobs. I finally bit the bullet and bought a Festool finish sander. It's been running strong for two years and shows no signs of letting up.

GEMorris fucked around with this message at 19:02 on Feb 11, 2011

truncated aardvar
Jan 21, 2011

WARNING: Contents may contain traces of nuts.


jackyl posted:

Sweet, I was thinking about posting a question about a tool purchase I am considering, but I'll start with a review first.

I recently purchased a Demel Multi Max from Home Depot, since I was building a set of builtins and wanted a way to cut the existing baseboard and crown out without wrecking the drywall or hardwood I had installed last year. I have no idea how I made do without an oscillating tool before this. It was fantastic and I wish I had gotten one before hardwooding most of my house and cutting door jambs with the standard cut off wheel plus chisel plan. It is also great for cutting electric outlet boxes out of cabinet and thin wood insets.

As far as attachments go, I have just used the flush cut blade, wood / drywall saw blade, and sanding attachments so far but will be using more as I go. I've found that the flush cut blade is just as good as, if not better than, the saw blade, at least for drywall, moldings, and thin wood panels. It cut just as fast and offered tighter control. This is going to definitely become one of my go to tools. Other brands are probably better, but this was an impulse buy that I don't regret.

Iskariot posted:

Fein Multimaster is the same type tool as the Dremel Multi Max but industry quality. Fein sells an even stronger and more expensive version named the Fein SuperCut.

This is really the home improvement super tool. I bought the Top version with several sawblades, some fugue handling accessories, delta sanding plates, dust extraction device and a nice case. Expensive but superb quality.

Some of my future projects around the house include:

- Sanding and refinishing my window and door frames
- Removing the carpet from three bedrooms, the hall and lounge room and replacing with floating flooring, made of either hardwood, decent (thick) hardwood laminate or bamboo.
- Remodelling/re-tiling the bathroom and kitchen

I've never considered (or even been much aware of) these kinds of tools, but upon reading these posts and researching they look awesome and I'll probably pick one up when the time comes. I'll still probably get a random orbital for most of the sanding, but the profile sanding attachment looks pretty good. I wasn't looking forward to cutting the bottom trim from 10 doorways, some of them in really tricky spots, but the flush cut blades look like they'd be a snap. I'm sure there are a hundered different uses I could think of, especially working on stuff that's already in place. Hell, depending on how effective the tool is and where the nails are, I'd now consider trimming the bottom of the baseboard in place rather than prying it off and reattaching it on the wall to fit the flooring underneath.

Considering the amount of work I'd be doing would I be happy with the Dremel or should I upgrade to the Fein? If the Fein is going to last a lifetime I'm happy to pay the extra.

I don't consider Dremel a budget brand at all, mostly because I lusted after their rotary tool years ago when I was much poorer - I settled for a cheap knock off which hasn't served me too badly when I work around its limitations. As an aside, just looking around now the prices of the Dremel rotary tools seem to have come down in the last 10 years or so but that might be an illusion brought on by me being a little less poor than I used to be. I'm guessing the country of manufacture may have changed too.

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


Bosch has both the green DIY version and the blue professional grade version of this tool. They even have cordless versions in both segments. Protip: Don't buy a cordless version. They are usually 10.8 or 12V with 1-1.3 Ah and they under-perform.

http://www.axminster.co.uk/bosch-bo...ter-prod833182/

This is the corded, industrial strength version. I haven't actually used this but even the green Bosch are viewed as nice for beginners. The Fein is fantastic but expensive. I bought it before Bosch had a blue corded version. Now I may have reconsidered. Bosch generally make great tools.

The tool itself should have some weight. The green Bosch is quite light and will transfer more of the energy to your arms. The Fein is heavier and most of the energy will transfer to the work piece. The Fein is also a work beast. I've abused it to the point that the front end was too hot to touch and it kept going. After hours of scraping or sanding, you really want to have as little energy transfer to the arms as possible. Even with the heavy Fein, my fingers were tingling for a couple of hours. Had I done the same with a light tool, I fear my fingers would have fallen off.

If you plan to use this now and then, any oscillating multi-tool will do. If you are like me and do some rather hefty home-improvements from time to time, the Fein will be worth the investment. It also works wonders as a delta sander and can be hooked up to a vacuum unit. The top kits of the MultiMaster have a quick release of the work piece. I also recommend to get a Top kit as the attachments are rather expensive. I imagine the blue Bosch will have cheaper attachments.


TL;DR: Get the Fein or blue Bosch if you plan to use this for several hours. Don not get a cordless version. Get the Dremel if you plan to make a hole once a year or something.

truncated aardvar
Jan 21, 2011

WARNING: Contents may contain traces of nuts.


Thanks for that.

I still like the look of the Fein - the tooless changing of bit is almost worth the extra price of admission alone.

I looks like I'll be importing since the price difference is staggering between what I can find as a 'good' price in Australia and what I could find in the UK. Even factoring in freight (which will be largish due to the big case) and a new plug, I'll still be well ahead.

(EDIT) - ordered. They're going to advise me on freight costs before shipping.

truncated aardvar fucked around with this message at 22:08 on Feb 12, 2011

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


Welcome to the club. You won't be disappointed.

Fein seems to have dropped the price on the MultiMaster recently, especially on the Top kits. This is probably due to competitors launching their own tools. The only osculating multi-tool that can be said to be better is the Fein SuperCut. It's 400W instead of 240W (IIRC) but it costs an arm and a leg and is more of a specialist tool. You can see the SuperCut sold in special packages for carpenters, plumbers, electricians and so on. Prices I've seen start at around 1000 USD. I can live with my "cheap" MultiMaster.

Anubis
Oct 9, 2003

It's hard to keep sand out of ears this big.

Fun Shoe

Anyone have recommendations on chainsaws?

The one I have: http://www.poulanpro.com/node7967.aspx?pid=210963 is kinda poo poo. I mean, it works wonders if your just doing some branch trimming or taking down some 8-12" sapling but the moment you start getting into anything large it starts cutting like a hot knife into granite. Oh and just to give a full review on that chainsaw... It's fairly easy to start, engine holds up well but the chain has some real trouble staying tight. Luckily they knew about this flaw and provided a tool-less chain tightener that honestly is mediocre at best but at least convenient. Overall, if your not actually cutting large trees down you could do worse for the money. It just isn't big enough for the heavy jobs.

Is there anything better that won't run me over $400 or so?

Anubis fucked around with this message at 01:25 on Feb 13, 2011

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

Anubis posted:

Anyone have recommendations on chainsaws?

The one I have: http://www.poulanpro.com/node7967.aspx?pid=210963 is kinda poo poo. I mean, it works wonders if your just doing some branch trimming or taking down some 8-12" sapling but the moment you start getting into anything large it starts cutting like a hot knife into granite. Oh and just to give a full review on that chainsaw... It's fairly easy to start, engine holds up well but the chain has some real trouble staying tight. Luckily they knew about this flaw and provided a tool-less chain tightener that honestly is mediocre at best but at least convenient. Overall, if your not actually cutting large trees down you could do worse for the money. It just isn't big enough for the heavy jobs.

Is there anything better that won't run me over $400 or so?

Any non-big-box Husqy or any stihl. Most folks don't need anything bigger than 40-45 cc's. I've got a 345, a Rancher 44, and a 262XP. The 345 would be more than enough for 99% of people. I only use my 262 on really big poo poo (18+ inch diameter hardwood, or 24+inch softwood), and even that's really overkill.

The big-box store saws are complete crap, they have a lifespan of 1/10 that of a real saw. Head to your local Husqy dealer, and pick up a small saw. If you maintain it, it'll last you basically your entire life. My Rancher 44 is from 1979, and i rescued it from a shed. It still runs, and although parts are hard to find, its still a strong saw.

The other key is a good, sharp chain. Learn to sharpen your own, it only take me about 20 minutes to sharpen a 20" loop.

Error 404 NpH
Nov 26, 2000



Werner 4' fiberglass step ladder


I had been meaning to get a small step ladder and when lowes had this one on sale for $20 on black friday I couldn't pass it up. At 4' its the perfect ladder for around the house, its light and easy to move around and you can easily reach an 8' ceiling. I painted the whole inside of my house off this thing, its so much easier to work with than a 6' which is often overkill.

thegreatcodfish
Aug 2, 2004


If anyone was planning to get a Hakko 936 soldering station, now is the time. They have been discontinued and I know that Fry's dropped the price to clear them out.

quote:

Bulletin No: PB303

Issue Date: 1-17-2011

Effective Date: 1-17-2011

Product Description:
Hakko 936-ESD Soldering Station

Part No:
936-xx; 950-936; C1158

Specification:
DISCONTINUED

Comments:
The Hakko 936-ESD Soldering Station has
been discontinued and replaced with the
Hakko FX-888 Soldering Station. Replacement parts for the Hakko 936-ESD Soldering Station will still be
available only until the present parts supply is exhausted.

For more information, please visit our web site at https://www.hakkousa.com.

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!

thegreatcodfish posted:

If anyone was planning to get a Hakko 936 soldering station, now is the time. They have been discontinued and I know that Fry's dropped the price to clear them out.

How do these compare to Weller stations? I'm in the market.

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

I'll fulfill the bragging portion of this thread and let you all know I scored a Ridgid worm drive off Craigslist for 40 bucks. Going to officially retire my trusty but ragged Craftsman

GEMorris
Aug 28, 2002

Glory To the Order!


dwoloz posted:

I'll fulfill the bragging portion of this thread and let you all know I scored a Ridgid worm drive off Craigslist for 40 bucks. Going to officially retire my trusty but ragged Craftsman

Nice, that's a good saw and you saved $120. Heavy, but what worm drive isn't?

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


Perhaps a dumb question but what is the main purpose of a worm drive? Is it just a substitute for a circular hand saw (what you yanks call a Skilsaw, I guess) or does it preform another function?

Anyone got any experience with a Makita MLT100? I don't think it's sold in the US and it's unknown in Norway. Reason I ask is that it's relatively cheap compared to other contractor/table saws. Some claim the motor is slightly weak and the blade protection is flimsy. I can change the motor if it comes to it and the safety gear can be modded. It sports a very large table for a portable table saw and a bunch of neat features. The fence looks a bit small but people claim it's preforming decently. I can always upgrade to some Delta or Incra contraption later on. I'm not so keen on shelling out 1000-1200 USD for a DW745 or equivalent from Bosch or Makita. I think I saw a DW745 on sale at HD for like $200 this summer. The price gap is just insane.

I can't get a stationary table saw. I don't have a dedicated shop and I'm not able to get one anytime soon. I'm still on the lookout for woodworking machines that I can make portable but the largest units just have to wait.

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


D-D-D-D-DOUBLE POST!

On the subject of tools and woodworking, I recommend this blog: http://woodgears.ca/

Many articles on different woodworking stuff but some tool articles worth checking out as well. This: http://woodgears.ca/saw_arbor/index.html is probably worth checking out for all you table/contractor saw owners.

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

Bench saws like that are fairly mickey mouse and for the price, you can get a fantastic high quality stationary saw second hand. The table on that Makita is undersized, rip capacity is tiny, the fence looks like a joke, doesn't even extend the length of the table. My advice, spend your money elsewhere unless you absolutely need to have a portable job site saw
A stationary saw on a mobile base might be a good compromise for your situation


Edit: Re: worm drive
Instead of direct drive or belt drive, it uses a worm drive, helical gear in an oil bath. This does a few things: changes the orientation of the motor for different ergonomics/sight line, provides more torque/mechanical advantage and its a very durable long lasting drive system. Oh, and it weighs a poo poo ton

dwoloz fucked around with this message at 18:11 on Feb 15, 2011

dinozaur
Aug 26, 2003
STUPID
DICK


There are several tools that I use a couple times a week that have served me very well.

Echo CS-330T chainsaw w/ 14" bar: light enough that I don't mind carrying it for 8 hours, enough power to quickly chop through what I need(look to another saw for 24" oak logs.) Honestly only regret not having the Farmboss once every 25 times I'm chopping something down, and the smaller saw is so much more maneuverable.

Makita 7-1/4" magnesium-frame Hypoid saw: At 13lbs, its light enough to manage and also doesn't bog down cutting pressure treated lumber or 2" flagstone. The "hypoid drive" means I don't need to change oil like in a wormdrive saw.

Dewalt 13amp reciprocating saw: years of consistently tearing poo poo up without asking questions.

Dewalt 4-1/2" angle grinder: years of abuse and still running well.

HK Porter Wire Cutters http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...catalogId=10053: The only wire cutters I've found that have worked for over a full season without either the handle falling off, rusting to pieces, or the bolts holding the blades together backing out. Lowes has their own version as well that have performed equally well.

Stanley FUBAR: Need to tear apart crates/a bathroom/kitchen/anything? This and a 3lb mini-sledge made my life a lot easier.

dinozaur fucked around with this message at 22:21 on Feb 15, 2011

GEMorris
Aug 28, 2002

Glory To the Order!


Iskariot posted:

Perhaps a dumb question but what is the main purpose of a worm drive? Is it just a substitute for a circular hand saw (what you yanks call a Skilsaw, I guess) or does it preform another function?

Anyone got any experience with a Makita MLT100? I don't think it's sold in the US and it's unknown in Norway. Reason I ask is that it's relatively cheap compared to other contractor/table saws. Some claim the motor is slightly weak and the blade protection is flimsy. I can change the motor if it comes to it and the safety gear can be modded. It sports a very large table for a portable table saw and a bunch of neat features. The fence looks a bit small but people claim it's preforming decently. I can always upgrade to some Delta or Incra contraption later on. I'm not so keen on shelling out 1000-1200 USD for a DW745 or equivalent from Bosch or Makita. I think I saw a DW745 on sale at HD for like $200 this summer. The price gap is just insane.

I can't get a stationary table saw. I don't have a dedicated shop and I'm not able to get one anytime soon. I'm still on the lookout for woodworking machines that I can make portable but the largest units just have to wait.

Check the woodworking thread for my posts about Radial Arm Saws (which ones to buy, which ones to avoid, and why they are the perfect solution for a situation like yours.

A benchtop saw really isn't the answer to any question, if space and portability is the biggest consideration, get a track saw. If having the most capabilities in a given size, while costing the least is the main consideration, get a good old Dewalt or Delta radial arm saw.

Also: You live in Norway? Find me a job and a worker's permit, and I'll bring you tons of tools, promise

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


Way to crush my dreams, guys.

I know a contractor saw is far from ideal. My problem is that I have to wheel the saw outdoors from a small stall and everything has to fit through a 90cm door. I'm not so bothered that the table isn't comparable to a high end Delta. I just have to make due with something smaller and portable. The fence would probably be replaced at some point.

I'm not going to buy anything right now so I'm still watching listings for used machinery like a hawk. Problem is, I can't really get a 30 year old beauty with a big-rear end cast-iron table as I have nowhere to put it.

GEMorris: We discussed radials in the woodworking thread a little while ago. I'm still looking for one but the market for such tools is tiny in Norway. I had one prospect but I had to let it go due to having a 3-phase motor. A phase converter that can handle this would cost quite a bit.

The woodworking thread is also why I haven't invested in a table/contractor saw yet. Still trying to find something more suitable for detailed jobs.

Sadly no intel on Norwegian cabinet maker jobs. I found one though. Fancy building boats?

GEMorris
Aug 28, 2002

Glory To the Order!


Iskariot posted:

Sadly no intel on Norwegian cabinet maker jobs. I found one though. Fancy building boats?

Hah, no experience with that one, I doubt they'd hire a foreigner with no experience.

I'm actually a letterpress printer by day, I don't think I'd want to do woodworking to pay the bills.

Regardless, my point was that even though you have poor availability of tools and high prices, you could live in the US with tons of cheap tools and no social safety net, which would be worse.

What is involved with importing tools from the UK or Germany? I know Norway isn't in the EU but don't they have free trade agreements? Would you be looking at other fees on top of VAT? I've seen many Inca tools on ebay.co.uk that I would love to have, but can't afford shipping them across the atlantic.

Also, WRT 3-phase power and phase converters. If the RAS is 1.5hp and under, especially if it is 1hp and under, look into running it with a VFD rather than a rotary phase converter. The cost of small VFDs has dropped to where it is usually the cheaper option.

BrokenKnucklez
Apr 22, 2008

by zen death robot


To any one looking for a quality 2 cycle out door power tools make sure you give echo a good look. Great power, decent fuel consumption, and literally can be used for hours on end. I have a saw that is now almost 20 years old and still fires on the 3rd or 4th pull. The engines in the home owner tools are, for the most part, the same as the professional line engines.

Edit: They are backed by a 5 year warranty, one of the longest in the industry. The Home Depot ones are still even pretty good for big box store power tools.

BrokenKnucklez fucked around with this message at 04:00 on Feb 17, 2011

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


GEMorris posted:

Hah, no experience with that one, I doubt they'd hire a foreigner with no experience.

I'm actually a letterpress printer by day, I don't think I'd want to do woodworking to pay the bills.

Regardless, my point was that even though you have poor availability of tools and high prices, you could live in the US with tons of cheap tools and no social safety net, which would be worse.

What is involved with importing tools from the UK or Germany? I know Norway isn't in the EU but don't they have free trade agreements? Would you be looking at other fees on top of VAT? I've seen many Inca tools on ebay.co.uk that I would love to have, but can't afford shipping them across the atlantic.

Also, WRT 3-phase power and phase converters. If the RAS is 1.5hp and under, especially if it is 1hp and under, look into running it with a VFD rather than a rotary phase converter. The cost of small VFDs has dropped to where it is usually the cheaper option.
I import pretty much everything tool-related. Doing this you subtract the VAT, add shipping and then pay the Norwegian taxes on the total. As long as it's not too heavy or large, you can save up to half the cost. Sadly, larger items cost an arm and a leg in shipping alone. Axminster(.co.uk) will charge 200 to ship a Makita MLT100. So 250 in shipping alone after taxes. Importing from Germany will be roughly the same, I think.

I'll buy from Norwegian shops when they are roughly comparable in price. I get an extended warranty as long as it's not bought through a company. Some shops also give extended warranty as a sales pitch. But when stuff costs over twice the amount UK-based shops offer, with shipping and taxes, there's no way. Norwegian shops are stuck in pre-Internet times where you have no competition and customers came regardless. We have competitive IT shops in this country so it's not just national expenses that drive prices up. The general know-how in larger HD/Lowe's equivalents is nonexistent so they can't argue that either.

But, yeah. Minor annoyance for living in a safe and rich country.

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truncated aardvar
Jan 21, 2011

WARNING: Contents may contain traces of nuts.


I had no idea tools were so expensive in Norway - it's so close to everywhere, at least from an Aussie perspective. Comes from living in such a large country I guess. Looking at it on the map now it is deceptively large and the overland route to Europe looks like a bitch.

I feel for you on tool prices - I'm currently tracking that multimaster you kindly linked me to. It cost me 69 ($110) in shipping but I'm still saving at least $200. I might have even gotten it cheaper from the US but I was after a 240v unit. Here in Australia you don't pay the 10% GST on anything under $1000 when you import, which contributes to the savings.

Tools from Asia aren't so bad though - that MLT100 is only marginally cheaper in the UK than it is here. I guess if you can import container loads of stuff that sells in large quantities in Bunnings (our Lowes) then the prices come down.

On an aside note, I do love tracking parcels from overseas. It's like I get to go on holidays vicariously through my parcels Who wouldn't want to visit TNT's Liege Euro Hub in Belgium? Sounds exciting, although my impression of Belgium after driving through it to get to Amsterdam is just lots of flat. I have another parcel that just went through Memphis - the ghost of Evlis has laid down some good joojoo on my stuff.

truncated aardvar fucked around with this message at 19:09 on Feb 17, 2011

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