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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

taqueso posted:

Maybe I've been reading too many "make sure you take apart your HF <tool> and clean out the sand they call grease and replace with good grease so it will last more than a month" posts.

I just want to ensure it will be a trusted friend and not a future headache.

Not the same with compressor oil.

I mean, drain and fill if it makes you feel better. Always a good plan with a new one after break in, but in the end the most important thing is: is there oil in it? The second most important thing: is there ENOUGH oil in it?

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canyoneer
Sep 13, 2005


I only have canyoneyes for you


socketwrencher posted:

These oscillating blades aren't bad- I'm not going to pay $35 for 3 Bosch blades:

https://www.amazon.com/HOTBEST-Osci...ref_=ast_sto_dp

Bless you. I'm going to buy a bucket o' blades now.

I just did ~80 linear feet of cuts on galvanized corrugated sheet metal roofing for some planter boxes. I tried tin snips (not the longer aviation style ones), big nope.
Angle grinder with cutoff wheel did better on the long rips than the short cuts.
An oscillating tool just gobbled through those cuts and it was very easy to make them straight.

The angle grinder is perhaps my most feared tool in my home and any chance I have to use something else, I'm going to use something else.

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

canyoneer posted:

The angle grinder is perhaps my most feared tool in my home and any chance I have to use something else, I'm going to use something else.

Amen. The grinder and the router should be treated like rattlesnakes imo.

B-Nasty
May 25, 2005



As long as you use the handle and keep the guard on and between you and the wheel/disc, angle grinders aren't that bad, and they're so useful. It's the dummies that remove the guard and limp wrist it with one hand that end up pulling disc fragments out of their eyeball.

The humble ladder, even a short one, is probably responsible for more crippling and death than anything else.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





canyoneer posted:

The angle grinder is perhaps my most feared tool in my home and any chance I have to use something else, I'm going to use something else.

Same all around.


B-Nasty posted:

The humble ladder, even a short one, is probably responsible for more crippling and death than anything else.

My ladder is the only tool I fear more than my grinder, with the added bonus of I loving hate it too. I fear my grinder but like what it can do. I look at my ladder and think "joy, now I get to feel unstable while doing something tedious and way high up".

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.




B-Nasty posted:

As long as you use the handle and keep the guard on and between you and the wheel/disc, angle grinders aren't that bad, and they're so useful. It's the dummies that remove the guard and limp wrist it with one hand that end up pulling disc fragments out of their eyeball.

The humble ladder, even a short one, is probably responsible for more crippling and death than anything else.

Yeah cripes, those old rickety wooden fuckers that painters used to lug around rather than burning like they should have- aka widow makers.

A good one is like an OT Proverb. Yea, a good solid ladder will elevate thine rear end to safety and lo unto to heaven like Jacob, and keep thy spirit in body unbroken four score &c.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

canyoneer posted:

Bless you. I'm going to buy a bucket o' blades now.

I just did ~80 linear feet of cuts on galvanized corrugated sheet metal roofing for some planter boxes. I tried tin snips (not the longer aviation style ones), big nope.
Angle grinder with cutoff wheel did better on the long rips than the short cuts.
An oscillating tool just gobbled through those cuts and it was very easy to make them straight.

The angle grinder is perhaps my most feared tool in my home and any chance I have to use something else, I'm going to use something else.

Anytime I'm cutting metal with an OMT, I use the Bosch carbide blades. I'll spend the dosh.

I fear my small 4, 4.5", 5, or 6" angle grinders far less than my lathe and mill. The 9" Metabo grinder... I haven't gotten the courage to even fit a disk to it yet.

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.

sharkytm posted:

The 9" Metabo grinder... I haven't gotten the courage to even fit a disk to it yet.

Ah yes. In my mis-spent youth I put in some quality time with an ancient 8" grinder under a tug in dry dock. Still have the scars.

Chainsaw, ladder, tractor, router... I do this for fun?

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

Hexigrammus posted:

Ah yes. In my mis-spent youth I put in some quality time with an ancient 8" grinder under a tug in dry dock. Still have the scars.

Chainsaw, ladder, tractor, router... I do this for fun?
I ran a needle gun and a grinder inside the hull of an LCM6 for a summer. That's noise you can't block with plugs, muffs, or both. I probably owe some of my RSI to that work.


Add Forklift to that, too. Can you believe they'll let you buy one with ZERO training or licensure? You can do a lot of damage with one, that's for sure. However, they're nothing compared to a tractor. I grew up in farm country, and using PTO-driven accessories was an awakening in "why OSHA exists".
Chainsaw... good lord, yeah. I've got Labonville full-wrap chaps and a helmet, and my 261 still scares me. They make nice clean cuts in wood, not so much on flesh.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Apparently the HPT zero clearance sliding miter is selling for $179 at Lowes on clearance.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Recommend me the most powerful shop vac.

I have a smaller size one, which is fine, but I need the big hose and a lot of suction.

oXDemosthenesXo
May 9, 2005


Grimey Drawer

What for? Is a vacuum the right tool or are you into dust collector territory?

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster

I've never used an angle grinder and I really don't want to. I don't feel the same fear with a router though. I feel like I might gently caress up my piece, but not my parts.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I'm giving real thought to upgrading my table saw.

Current saw is a 10" DeWalt DW745. It's alright, the fence is fine, dust collection is OK, fine adjustment is alright if a little plasticky, which is generally true of the whole unit.

It's built into a workbench to provide a bit of runout table, and presumably a certain amount of that will be unavoidable even with a larger floor-standing saw, but the less I have to build to make use of it the better.

My main grievance is lack of cross-cut ability. The window between "too big for the mitre saw" and "too big for a cross-cut sled" is pretty narrow. While it'd be nice to chuck a full sheet of ply on there to chop up, that's a nice to have.

Here in the UK there are "standard"-looking US-style saws, and there's saws with sliding arm attachments, and there's panel saws. I'm not sure whether panel saws are so specialised that they can't really be used as well for smaller stuff? I've no idea really. I also don't mind buying British or continental, but I've no reference point for any brands for machinery of this size outside of Axminster who I'm not sure are all that these days.

Something with high quality sliding capability is I think what I'm after.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


oXDemosthenesXo posted:

What for? Is a vacuum the right tool or are you into dust collector territory?

Sucking up large debris, covering larger areas in less time, and removing dog hair from my car.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


its going to be pretty rough to get a cross-cut sled that'll cut a 4' sheet of ply/OSB unless you take something like a table saw and make a huge table around it and a big ole sled, or get a panel saw which really wont work well as a table saw. Other option is a track saw which is just a modified circular saw that works well with a guide so you get better cuts.

Not sure if there's a tool that will do a good job cutting sheet goods, and smaller "large wood" that's not like 2x4 or 2x6


FogHelmut posted:

Sucking up large debris, covering larger areas in less time, and removing dog hair from my car.


I have this guy and it's pretty freekin strong, I was using it indoors and it was pulling my carpeting quite taut.. warning if you're sucking up fine particles like drywall you may want to upgrade the filter, the one that comes with it was just blowing dust right out the exhaust.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-...D1200/304006023

This one is on sale, seems like same vac with better filters included (includign the $25 hepa filter) - It is backordered though because it's a kickass deal

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-...1200E/308058425

tater_salad fucked around with this message at 13:58 on May 19, 2020

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




tater_salad posted:

its going to be pretty rough to get a cross-cut sled that'll cut a 4' sheet of ply/OSB unless you take something like a table saw and make a huge table around it and a big ole sled

Yeah, a sled isn't really practical for these reasons.

tater_salad posted:

or get a panel saw which really wont work well as a table saw.

Could you clarify what problems the panel saw causes compared to a fixed table saw? Do they apply equally to sliding arms (which are distinct from full-fat panel saws)?

tater_salad posted:

Other option is a track saw which is just a modified circular saw that works well with a guide so you get better cuts.

I have a good one of these and I'm happy with it, but it can be unwieldy and inaccurate to use without a lot of effort to get things clamped down and aligned well, so I mostly just use it for breaking down full sheets, so the sort of thing I'd be cutting on the table saw isn't full sheets (though I wouldn't mind that capability just so I can leave the track saw in the box), but stuff that is close-ish to final size.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Jaded Burnout posted:

I'm giving real thought to upgrading my table saw.

Current saw is a 10" DeWalt DW745. It's alright, the fence is fine, dust collection is OK, fine adjustment is alright if a little plasticky, which is generally true of the whole unit.

It's built into a workbench to provide a bit of runout table, and presumably a certain amount of that will be unavoidable even with a larger floor-standing saw, but the less I have to build to make use of it the better.

My main grievance is lack of cross-cut ability. The window between "too big for the mitre saw" and "too big for a cross-cut sled" is pretty narrow. While it'd be nice to chuck a full sheet of ply on there to chop up, that's a nice to have.

Here in the UK there are "standard"-looking US-style saws, and there's saws with sliding arm attachments, and there's panel saws. I'm not sure whether panel saws are so specialised that they can't really be used as well for smaller stuff? I've no idea really. I also don't mind buying British or continental, but I've no reference point for any brands for machinery of this size outside of Axminster who I'm not sure are all that these days.

Something with high quality sliding capability is I think what I'm after.
What's your intended use and how wide do you want to crosscut? My crosscut sled for my 10" delta unisaw can cut 26" with +/- a 64th across the cut. I could probably build something wider but I've never needed it. Most cabinetry and casework is less than 26"d, and that's the main use I would need the accuracy of a crosscut sled. A big wide tabletop is gonna get cut down with a circ saw, and who cares if it's a 16th out of square over 4'. I'm not really familiar with your current saw, but I wouldn't think there would be anything substantially different to keep you from building a wider crosscut sled (blade height may be limiting?). You are still likely going to want some sort of runoff table built around the saw-they're a dangerous enough tool even with one.

It's my understanding that panel saws can be used for general use-sort of. Many of them won't accept dado stacks, and the lack of a big flat table on some could present some problems. They also have a much much larger footprint than a normal american cabinet saw. I think Felder/Hammer (maybe minimax too if they are in the UK?) make some small sliders that might work for you if you want to go that route but they are all $$$. I don't know anything about Axminster, but it seems like they are maybe the Grizzly of the UK-decent enough and cheap enough rebadged chinese/taiwanese stuff that might take a bit of fiddling to get working really well?

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


Jaded Burnout posted:

Yeah, a sled isn't really practical for these reasons.

Could you clarify what problems the panel saw causes compared to a fixed table saw? Do they apply equally to sliding arms (which are distinct from full-fat panel saws)?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwauk...80-20/100077431
I'm thinking of one of these "panel saws" which is not going to be as accurate IMO (no experience) but basically you lay the wood on it measure it up slide to where you want to cut and cut it. This is great for ripping OSB and Ply all day but for cutting 4 pieces of 5x10x1 wood down you're using to make a small box or whatever might not be as accurate doing so as with a set fence on your saw. I also don't think they can do miters. Edit: and no dado stacks in there either


If you mean one of these as a sliding arm: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radial_arm_saw
They've pretty much gone out of style at least here in the US, usually seen at home depots for cutting dimensional lumber, or old guy garages. Turning the saw 90 and ripping the wood can create projectiles from it grabbing a knot, there's not a simple way to set up a fence for them for accurate repeated cuts. Mostly sliding miter saws have filled their void, and anything that would be too big to cut would be better done with a track/circular/table saw.

tater_salad fucked around with this message at 14:21 on May 19, 2020

DrBouvenstein
Feb 28, 2007

I think I'm a doctor, but that doesn't make me a doctor. This fancy avatar does.


I'm sure the answer is "whatever one I like most/seems to run best" but just wondering if there's any quantifiable reason one of these mowers is better than the other two. Something like,
"Oh, all Weed Eaters are garbage, avoid them!"

Of course, they all have Briggs and Stratton engines, so I'm pretty sure that's not really a factor.



Each has pros and cons.

Poulan:
4.5 HP
Pro: Self propelled.
Con: Mulching. I would actually prefer to have it discharge or bag so I can add clippings to compost. I might could put in a non-mulching blade and see if it discharges out the chute?
This is also the only one I paid money for (at least directly.) Bought used 3 or 4 summers ago for $50 from a small engine repair guy intown, and just this summer bought a new carb and idle spring.

Craftsman:
5.5 HP (I think, doesn't say but specs online say it's 5.5 or 5/75)
Pro: Non-mulching, and I can order a replacement bag for it.
Con: A little smaller than the other two.
Free side of the road mower I got over the weekend. Started on the first freakin' pull.

Weed Eater:
4.75 HP
Pro: The big rear wheels make it a little easier to move around
Con: Despite side discharge chute, it also mulches, so like the Poulan would require me to purchase a new blade (Craftsman is 1" smaller than the other two, so not sure if it's blade will fit correctly.)
Free side of the road mower. Needed an idle spring and a new carb jet, spend less than $10 total.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


Personal experience:
Had a weedeater of similar vintage /stule that fuckin lasted forever.. My dad bought it and we cut the lawn with it for 15+ years.. just an oil change occasionally and blade sharpening.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

What's your intended use and how wide do you want to crosscut? My crosscut sled for my 10" delta unisaw can cut 26" with +/- a 64th across the cut. I could probably build something wider but I've never needed it. Most cabinetry and casework is less than 26"d, and that's the main use I would need the accuracy of a crosscut sled. A big wide tabletop is gonna get cut down with a circ saw, and who cares if it's a 16th out of square over 4'. I'm not really familiar with your current saw, but I wouldn't think there would be anything substantially different to keep you from building a wider crosscut sled (blade height may be limiting?). You are still likely going to want some sort of runoff table built around the saw-they're a dangerous enough tool even with one.

So, right now I'm looking at having to trim down approx 800mm wide stair risers, which at 300mm are too deep for my mitre saw. This causes a problem with my current sled because a) it doesn't provide much support out to the left of the blade for something that wide, so I'd have to build a very wide sled, plus some sort of side table or support, plus add some runner slots because they're both centered on the blade, b) doesn't provide much depth because the table of the table saw is at the end of the workbench, so I'd have to add more support there too, which would likely get annoying for smaller work.

A lot of cabinetry isn't going to be so wide, but will likely be deep enough to hit some of these snags.

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

It's my understanding that panel saws can be used for general use-sort of. Many of them won't accept dado stacks, and the lack of a big flat table on some could present some problems. They also have a much much larger footprint than a normal american cabinet saw. I think Felder/Hammer (maybe minimax too if they are in the UK?) make some small sliders that might work for you if you want to go that route but they are all $$$.

Dado stacks aren't used or available very much in this part of the world for legality reasons, though they are available sometimes at a price. The panel saws I've seen tend to come with a bunch of table off to the right, with the sliding part more skeletal on the left.

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I don't know anything about Axminster, but it seems like they are maybe the Grizzly of the UK-decent enough and cheap enough rebadged chinese/taiwanese stuff that might take a bit of fiddling to get working really well?

Sounds about right.

tater_salad posted:

If you mean one of these as a sliding arm: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radial_arm_saw
They've pretty much gone out of style at least here in the US, usually seen at home depots for cutting dimensional lumber, or old guy garages. Turning the saw 90 and ripping the wood can create projectiles from it grabbing a knot, there's not a simple way to set up a fence for them for accurate repeated cuts. Mostly sliding miter saws have filled their void, and anything that would be too big to cut would be better done with a track/circular/table saw.

Not a radial arm, no, I have a sliding mitre saw. The types I'm referring to are:

Portable table saw (this is also the one I have, built into a workbench):


Regular-rear end table saw:


Table saw with sliding arm attachment:


Full-on panel saw:

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.




Jaded Burnout posted:

So, right now I'm looking at having to trim down approx 800mm wide stair risers, which at 300mm are too deep for my mitre saw. This causes a problem with my current sled because a) it doesn't provide much support out to the left of the blade for something that wide, so I'd have to build a very wide sled, plus some sort of side table or support, plus add some runner slots because they're both centered on the blade, b) doesn't provide much depth because the table of the table saw is at the end of the workbench, so I'd have to add more support there too, which would likely get annoying for smaller work.

A lot of cabinetry isn't going to be so wide, but will likely be deep enough to hit some of these snags.


Dado stacks aren't used or available very much in this part of the world for legality reasons, though they are available sometimes at a price. The panel saws I've seen tend to come with a bunch of table off to the right, with the sliding part more skeletal on the left.


Sounds about right.


Not a radial arm, no, I have a sliding mitre saw. The types I'm referring to are:

Portable table saw (this is also the one I have, built into a workbench):


Regular-rear end table saw:


Table saw with sliding arm attachment:


Full-on panel saw:


Have you priced one of those slider table saws? I know they're big in Europe, but those are production level and costwise too. Maybe think about getting an Incra miter gauge?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BZWyduxVZQ

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Mr. Mambold posted:

Have you priced one of those slider table saws? I know they're big in Europe, but those are production level and costwise too.

They seem to scale about the same as the other types. The middle kind is pretty much a normal table saw with an add-on.

Mr. Mambold posted:

Maybe think about getting an Incra miter gauge?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BZWyduxVZQ

I'd not be against it. I'd have to make sure the slots in my table are good enough, and I'd also have to build out the workbench further as I don't have nearly that much table to the sides of the blade, and the catch with mitre gauges is they don't provide any support for the workpiece.

I've avoided building out the sides on mine so far because the saw has controls on the sides that would become inaccessible, so I'd have to do something a bit more complicated than just extending the top.

I'd also have to find something suitable in the UK, since imports of this sort from the US usually spike the price quite a lot.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


I feel like part of your issue is you're overextending your portable table saw. They're great to stick on a workbench or drag to a job site and cut some stuff up on the job, but the table is usually small.

I owned one of these bad boys prior to my divorce (I beleive my ex sold it or her BF has it even though she shouldn't have) and Loved it.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/DELTA-Cont...-Saw/1001385562

It had enough room I could do poo poo like build a router table on it's one wing, it had a nice heavy steel main table and the wings weren't too terrible once adjusted flat. It is cost effective, small enough to wheel into a corner of my garage when not being used. I never really bogged it down on anything I tossed at it. I can say I don't think I ever cut full sheets with it. It did have a limit on how big of a dado stack you could use but that doesn't seem to be an issue for you.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




tater_salad posted:

I feel like part of your issue is you're overextending your portable table saw. They're great to stick on a workbench or drag to a job site and cut some stuff up on the job, but the table is usually small.

I owned one of these bad boys prior to my divorce (I beleive my ex sold it or her BF has it even though she shouldn't have) and Loved it.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/DELTA-Cont...-Saw/1001385562

It had enough room I could do poo poo like build a router table on it's one wing, it had a nice heavy steel main table and the wings weren't too terrible once adjusted flat. It is cost effective, small enough to wheel into a corner of my garage when not being used. I never really bogged it down on anything I tossed at it. I can say I don't think I ever cut full sheets with it. It did have a limit on how big of a dado stack you could use but that doesn't seem to be an issue for you.

So something more like this?

https://www.poolewood.co.uk/product...-saw-3hp-01332/

(possibly with a sliding carriage add-on, and perhaps 12" because why not?)

edit:

quote:

The optional Sliding Carriage for the 10″ Cast Iron Table Saw increases the table saw capacity to cross-cut 8.0ft x 4.0ft sheets in one pass. 01495 see separate listing

i.e. a larger saw top in general making things easier, and the sliding carriage as a nice-to-have for breaking down full sheets.

Jaded Burnout fucked around with this message at 16:53 on May 19, 2020

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Jaded Burnout posted:

They seem to scale about the same as the other types. The middle kind is pretty much a normal table saw with an add-on.


I'd not be against it. I'd have to make sure the slots in my table are good enough, and I'd also have to build out the workbench further as I don't have nearly that much table to the sides of the blade, and the catch with mitre gauges is they don't provide any support for the workpiece.

I've avoided building out the sides on mine so far because the saw has controls on the sides that would become inaccessible, so I'd have to do something a bit more complicated than just extending the top.

I'd also have to find something suitable in the UK, since imports of this sort from the US usually spike the price quite a lot.

It seems like your main problem with the saw is that the table, especially to the front and left of the blade, is too small. A roller stand to the left of the saw might help you support long work, but they are kind of a PITA. Extending your runoff table to the left of the blade would be another option, but has disadvantages of its own as you mention. A regular cabinet saw with a table extension wing on the left seems like it would probably solve most of your problems. They're not very portable though, and with table wings are a good bit bigger than what you have now in terms of footprint. Getting 800mm of crosscut is going to be a challenge though-I would probably get out my circ saw for that if it's only a few cuts.

A slider arm would probably be nice, but definitely comes with a trade off in cost, flexibility, and a larger footprint for the saw. I remembered some chat about the add on sliders from the woodworking thread and found this which may be helpful as far as pros and cos for going that route:
https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...0#post496211703

I'm not sure if/how those axminster slider arms attach/detach easily in the event you do need to occasionally remove it.

e:

Jaded Burnout posted:

So something more like this?

https://www.poolewood.co.uk/product...-saw-3hp-01332/

(possibly with a sliding carriage add-on, and perhaps 12" because why not?)

edit:


i.e. a larger saw top in general making things easier, and the sliding carriage as a nice-to-have for breaking down full sheets.
Yeah that looks like a good regular-rear end table saw with nice big tables. I'm not that current on GBP/USD, but seems like a decent price for a 3hp saw?

Kaiser Schnitzel fucked around with this message at 17:07 on May 19, 2020

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Getting 800mm of crosscut is going to be a challenge though-I would probably get out my circ saw for that if it's only a few cuts.

24 cross cuts D:

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Yeah that looks like a good regular-rear end table saw with nice big tables. I'm not that current on GBP/USD, but seems like a decent price for a 3hp saw?

1,184.52 including tax is about $1500, not including the panel arm.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




OK, current front-runner is this:
https://www.sipuk.co.uk/sip-cast-ir...-5cm-01446.html

Same deal but 12" blade and 4hp. About $2200 all-in, without the sliding carriage, which would be another 800 bucks.

Elysium
Aug 21, 2003
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

https://www.murdochs.com/sales/murd...walt-tool-sale/

Anyone familiar enough with current prices that knows if these are a particularly good deals or is this just pretty standard "tools go on sale all the time" prices?

Here's some stuff I might be interested in, specifically:



The 10% is subtracted from the bolded price, so full sale price of the nailer for example is $187.19

Elysium fucked around with this message at 20:33 on May 20, 2020

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Harbor Freight is recalling almost half a million jack stands because they can drop suddenly. "Hazard Fraught" indeed.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/mone...020/5227291002/

Schadenboner
Aug 15, 2011

I MEAN, TURN OFF YOURE MONITOR, MIGTH EXPLAIN YOUR BAD POSTS, HOPE THIS HELPS?!

Is there a thread for lock-picking (obvs. recreational/non-professional, otherwise I'd look at TCC)?

Suntan Boy
May 27, 2005
Stained, dirty, smells like weed, possibly a relic from the sixties.





Elysium posted:

https://www.murdochs.com/sales/murd...walt-tool-sale/

Anyone familiar enough with current prices that knows if these are a particularly good deals or is this just pretty standard "tools go on sale all the time" prices?

Here's some stuff I might be interested in, specifically:



The 10% is subtracted from the bolded price, so full sale price of the nailer for example is $187.19

is , but there's nothing amazing there deal-wise. And while I've personally never had a DeWalt tool fail, Makita is about the same price and generally seems to have better build quality.


Schadenboner posted:

Is there a thread for lock-picking (obvs. recreational/non-professional, otherwise I'd look at TCC)?

I swear there was one, but I can't find it anymore. Probably archived.

Schadenboner
Aug 15, 2011

I MEAN, TURN OFF YOURE MONITOR, MIGTH EXPLAIN YOUR BAD POSTS, HOPE THIS HELPS?!

Suntan Boy posted:

I swear there was one, but I can't find it anymore. Probably archived.

Thanks anyways!

DreadLlama
Jul 15, 2005
Not just for breakfast anymore

Is there anything about conformal coating that makes it unsuitable for 110V tools? I'm rewatching AvE's video about waterproofing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSrERT1qv1Q and it seems to me that it would be easier to own a panel saw if your shop space for it was also your front yard.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I would think that maintaining a "waterproofed" full size machine would be harder, but perhaps you could go for a non-conforming coating. That would allow it to be more rigid and allow easier construction from more common materials. Would also suit bigger and heavier machines since they don't need to be so portable. Perhaps call it a Shielded External Dwelling, or ShED.

Nevets
Sep 11, 2002

Be they sad or be they well,
I'll make their lives a hell


That's a good idea, but what about if you made a larger multi-use version that could fit many different tools? Something like a Generalized Adaptable Repository Able to Guard Equipment, or GARAGE?

Rotten Cookies
Nov 11, 2008

gosh! i like both the islanders and the rangers!!! :^)



I'm lucky enough that my company let's me store my tools in their Space for Housing Overpriced Powertools

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

You're all space-having bastards. I literally had to make a Compact Ambulant Repository-based storage system for my tools.

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Mister Dog
Dec 27, 2005




Why dat fence on the wrong side?

Edit: on closer inspection, it looks like the fence can be positioned on either side of the blade. Ive never seen that before, is that a UK thing?

Mister Dog fucked around with this message at 23:45 on May 21, 2020

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