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DeathFromAbove1988
Mar 7, 2007

You're a woman, I'm a machine.

my new favourite tool is definitely my pull saw. I have the vaughan brand that I bought at a Lowes or Home Depot. It's cuts are much cleaner and easy to control. Come to think of it, I need to replace the blade. (So it doesn't deal well with Masonite/hardboard, learned that lesson the hard way)

DeathFromAbove1988 fucked around with this message at 23:30 on Feb 21, 2011

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Error 404 NpH
Nov 26, 2000



jackyl posted:

[*]1.5 Horsepower Bridge saw: Bridge style with 25" cutting length, which it appears applies to diagonal as well. I'm not sure about the pros and cons of a bridge model, though, and would appreciate any advice on that. It seems like a great option, except maybe for plunge style cuts?

I know you already bought the kobalt saw but just wanted to say I just bought this saw to do my bathroom. My brother has the 2.5hp tile/brick saw and its a nice saw but I needed something to do 25" cuts (18x18 on diagonal) so I picked up the bridge saw.



On sale for 230 - 20% off email coupon = 184+ tax. I paired it with a dewalt blade from lowes and the thing works great. It sliced through the travertine tile very nicely and left a perfect edge on all the tiles.

I also picked up this

1/2" Heavy Duty Low Speed Drill
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-ha...rill-93632.html
On sale for $40 - 20% off coupon = $32!

The low speed/hight torque is perfect for mixing thinset. If you try to mix that stuff with a regular drill it will burn it out in no time. For $32 its well worth it.

Also I have to say the new blue/grey color scheme harbor freight is using looks 100% better than the old cheap safety orange they used to use.

inspire
Nov 24, 2004
Eyyy!

Anyone bought/used the cordless Ryobi +1 range? Thinking about getting a starter kit for an upcoming job. http://www.ryobitools.com/lithium/

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

inspire posted:

Anyone bought/used the cordless Ryobi +1 range? Thinking about getting a starter kit for an upcoming job. http://www.ryobitools.com/lithium/

By "job" do you mean personal or professional?

I ask because I would not put Ryobi in the "professional" category; they're pretty much entry level stuff. Brands like DeWalt, Milwaukee, Makita, Hilti, Ridgid, etc will be more durable and better overall on a jobsite (despite most of these brands unfortunately now being owned by the same Asian mega corporations that pump out cheap stuff too)

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


Slight exception in your listing there: Hilti.

Probably the most durable brand of tools ever created. You seldom find hip and cutting-edge (terrible pun) Hilti tools. They sell tools simply because they last longer. I've talked to professionals that opted for something other than Hilti because the machines lasted so long they sort of went out of style. A bit weird but so they claimed. The hammer drills are probably the best in the world.

Homedepot prices on Hilti are so insane compared to here. The Hilti drywall screwdriver, SD 4500, costs $99 at HD. I would have to give over $400 for it. Professionals here still buy them in spades because they are superior.

Don't underestimate the joy of working with professional grade tools over DIY grade. I seldom buy anything DIY anymore even if it's a tool I seldom will use. It's not only the work hours you get from quality tools, it's overall quality.

If a drill goes from, say, $50 to $100 by upgrading a Ryobi to a DW/Makita/Bosch/Milwuakee/Hitachi/Ridgid/Hilti, you have spent 50 bucks to get something that could last you a lifetime. $50 is nothing. Granted, a cordless drill will have it's batteries give out on it at some point but new Li-Ion batteries last a long time if you store and use them correctly. Also remember that once you have invested in a pack with a charger and a couple of ~3Ah batteries, you can buy naked tools to supplement your workshop.

HexDog
Feb 4, 2009

Did you see Regis this morning?



Iskariot posted:

Slight exception in your listing there: Hilti.

Probably the most durable brand of tools ever created. You seldom find hip and cutting-edge (terrible pun) Hilti tools. They sell tools simply because they last longer. I've talked to professionals that opted for something other than Hilti because the machines lasted so long they sort of went out of style. A bit weird but so they claimed. The hammer drills are probably the best in the world.

Homedepot prices on Hilti are so insane compared to here. The Hilti drywall screwdriver, SD 4500, costs $99 at HD. I would have to give over $400 for it. Professionals here still buy them in spades because they are superior.

Don't underestimate the joy of working with professional grade tools over DIY grade. I seldom buy anything DIY anymore even if it's a tool I seldom will use. It's not only the work hours you get from quality tools, it's overall quality.

If a drill goes from, say, $50 to $100 by upgrading a Ryobi to a DW/Makita/Bosch/Milwuakee/Hitachi/Ridgid/Hilti, you have spent 50 bucks to get something that could last you a lifetime. $50 is nothing. Granted, a cordless drill will have it's batteries give out on it at some point but new Li-Ion batteries last a long time if you store and use them correctly. Also remember that once you have invested in a pack with a charger and a couple of ~3Ah batteries, you can buy naked tools to supplement your workshop.

+1 for Hilti.

The prices for their stuff are pretty ridiculous in the usual shops (Home Depot, Lowes). If you have a friend who works in construction, ask him if they have a tool buying program from where they work at. Most likely they do, especially if the friend is involved in some of trade (glaziers, electricians..), and just have him purchase Hilti stuff through the company's Hilti rep. I do it all the time for my friends and the Hilti guy doesn't give a poo poo.

cuntrageous
Jun 6, 2008




Can anyone suggest a decent soldering iron i.e one that doesnt melt through itself during normal usage. I was thinking maybe something in the propane variety since those seem to get a lot hotter a lot faster.

wattershed
Dec 27, 2002

Radio got his free iPod, did you get yours???

I want to build a table. Like, a 10' long table. Something like this: http://imm.io/3VLb

Instead of countersinking and doing all the pretty stuff with screws, I'd love to use a nail gun and do the joins in half the time.

I know I'll need either a framing nailer or a finish nailer, but I'm getting mixed signals on which type would be the best for this job and for others of a similar size that I'll do after the table.

Also, aside from craigslist/classifieds/ebay, anyone have recommendations for smaller-sized auction or sale sites? I see this as a very addictive hobby and want to expand my resources for obtaining tools as cheaply as possible.

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

cuntrageous posted:

Can anyone suggest a decent soldering iron i.e one that doesnt melt through itself during normal usage. I was thinking maybe something in the propane variety since those seem to get a lot hotter a lot faster.

Pick up a Weller with adjustable temperature control. You can find them cheap second hand on eBay or at auctions or maybe Craigslist
Keep your tip in good condition at all times; a top of the line soldering iron will still not work well if your tip isnt properly cleaned and tinned

dinozaur
Aug 26, 2003
STUPID
DICK


wattershed posted:

I know I'll need either a framing nailer or a finish nailer, but I'm getting mixed signals on which type would be the best for this job and for others of a similar size that I'll do after the table.

I would not consider a finish nailer for making the workbench you posted. Using a 2.5" finish nailer you would not have very much structural support, especially on those 3" and 4" boards pictured.

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

wattershed posted:

I want to build a table. Like, a 10' long table. Something like this: http://imm.io/3VLb

Instead of countersinking and doing all the pretty stuff with screws, I'd love to use a nail gun and do the joins in half the time.

I know I'll need either a framing nailer or a finish nailer, but I'm getting mixed signals on which type would be the best for this job and for others of a similar size that I'll do after the table.

Also, aside from craigslist/classifieds/ebay, anyone have recommendations for smaller-sized auction or sale sites? I see this as a very addictive hobby and want to expand my resources for obtaining tools as cheaply as possible.

Buying a compressor and nailer for this project would be overkill. Building a house, sure; building a workbench, meh.
Screws go in pretty fast, wont save that much time with a nailer. Hammer and nails would be just fine too. You'd want to predrill for the screws (and for large nails) and I can't recommend this enough: have both a drill and a driver (impact or otherwise). Makes the process very quick and easy

wattershed
Dec 27, 2002

Radio got his free iPod, did you get yours???

dwoloz posted:

Buying a compressor and nailer for this project would be overkill. Building a house, sure; building a workbench, meh.
Screws go in pretty fast, wont save that much time with a nailer. Hammer and nails would be just fine too. You'd want to predrill for the screws (and for large nails) and I can't recommend this enough: have both a drill and a driver (impact or otherwise). Makes the process very quick and easy

I wanted to avoid the large surface holes because I won't be doing much finishing of it (paint/stain-wise), and I was under the impression that a nail gun would make for a much cleaner entry hole. I haven't found a combination of wood fillers that I've been able to blend to really make the holes "disappear" in past projects.

Aside from just building this table, I'd be building other things in the future - coffee tables, bedframes, chairs, etc.

My larger question was whether or not, structurally, a finishing gun was sufficient for projects of this size. I think I'm getting the impression that it's not, and while I don't necessarily need a framing gun to build what I'll be building, it wouldn't necessarily hurt. Appreciate the responses.

Error 404 NpH
Nov 26, 2000



You could get a plug cutter to fill screw holes
http://www.amazon.com/CMT-529-095-3...98597348&sr=1-1

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

wattershed posted:

I wanted to avoid the large surface holes because I won't be doing much finishing of it (paint/stain-wise), and I was under the impression that a nail gun would make for a much cleaner entry hole. I haven't found a combination of wood fillers that I've been able to blend to really make the holes "disappear" in past projects.

This falls much more in the advanced realm of woodworking but the array of different jointery options, especially mortise and tenon, allow for concealed clean joints that are strong with no fasteners necessarily required (although you could shoot a few brads for good measure)
There are also trim screws which typically use square drive and have small heads, easier to patch the holes (although they are not as beefy as structural screws)
Also, theres a very popular jig made by Kreg for making pocket holes for screws

ibpooks
Nov 4, 2005


wattershed posted:

My larger question was whether or not, structurally, a finishing gun was sufficient for projects of this size.

Finish nails definitely will not hold together in any load-bearing furniture.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


inspire posted:

Anyone bought/used the cordless Ryobi +1 range? Thinking about getting a starter kit for an upcoming job. http://www.ryobitools.com/lithium/
I have a set of the old blue tools with the black/yellow NiCad batteries, and they're alright for home hobbyist sort of use. The batteries wear out pretty quick and stop holding a charge (they work just fine when freshly charged, it's just that you need to use them within a day of charging or they drop off pretty fast), but people have been complaining about that since the week after they came out.

I hear the new Lithium batteries are much better, and do work in the older-model tools (you will have to get a new charger, though).

inspire
Nov 24, 2004
Eyyy!

dwoloz posted:

By "job" do you mean personal or professional?

I ask because I would not put Ryobi in the "professional" category; they're pretty much entry level stuff. Brands like DeWalt, Milwaukee, Makita, Hilti, Ridgid, etc will be more durable and better overall on a jobsite (despite most of these brands unfortunately now being owned by the same Asian mega corporations that pump out cheap stuff too)
Professional but it's a one off thing. A few days work out on the water with no access to power. It's mostly a hand tool job and I would get a few batteries to keep going. I have intentions of moving overseas so don't really want to build up a stock of power tools.

truncated aardvar
Jan 21, 2011

WARNING: Contents may contain traces of nuts.


I want to put a shout out to my Stanley ratchet screwdriver...


They can be had for very cheap but it comes with a tonne of bits, most of which stay on the tool, and it has never failed me. I only need this as my only screw driver unless there's a need for one that's very short or very skinny. It's probably my most used tool.

Also, I got my Fein Multimaster a week ago and it's already seen some unexpected action. I cut through six metres of lattice in my yard in a couple of minutes with the included wood blade today. I was contemplating using a circular saw in a dangerous manner but then I remembered my expensive new toy. I also cut away some mild steel surround (like colour bond fencing frame) so I could get to a screw head.

I did manage to flip the quick release lever onto my knuckle which is quite bruised now and I'm having trouble bending that finger - an unforeseen danger. I'll keep my hand well down the body when I do this from now on! Luckily I have a fridge full of anaesthetic.

inspire posted:

Professional but it's a one off thing. A few days work out on the water with no access to power. It's mostly a hand tool job and I would get a few batteries to keep going. I have intentions of moving overseas so don't really want to build up a stock of power tools.

If you're getting a stack of batteries it may pay to get something decent, since you'll be able to use those batteries on other tools when you move. Keep in mind the voltage difference in your new country and the possible need to purchase a new charger if it doesn't come dual voltage.

Of course if you want a throw away solution, then Ryobi isn't bad.

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


truncated aardvar posted:

I did manage to flip the quick release lever onto my knuckle which is quite bruised now and I'm having trouble bending that finger - an unforeseen danger. I'll keep my hand well down the body when I do this from now on! Luckily I have a fridge full of anaesthetic.
Hehe, I did that with my thumb. Quite the kickback when the internal spring forces the lever down. Got a blue nail to show for it. A mistake you do just once.

It's worth the risk. I've tried the green Bosch with a bolt instead of the quick release and it was a PITA when you changed attachments rapidly.

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

What's the consensus on leaving air compressors pressurized when not in use: not advisable? dangerous? perfectly safe and OK?

I have a small bicycle shop opening to the public soon and was pondering whether Id keep my air compressor pressurized overnight or depressurize it everyday

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


It doesn't hurt anything to leave it pressurized, but turn it off so if there is a leak it won't run all night.

And remember to drain the moisture from the tank on a regular basis.

ibpooks
Nov 4, 2005


I always leave mine pressurized but flip the breaker off when I'm out of the shop. What the hell can the compressor do when you're gone that it can't do when you're there? You do occasionally want to drain the tank out through the bottom valve just to get the water condensate out of the tank so it doesn't rust through, but daily is really unnecessary.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

The best thing to do is install an auto-drain system. Every time the compressor turns off (fills the tank), it'll open the drain for a few seconds. I've got to install mine, but I got it from HF for pretty short money.

My 80 gallon 175PSI compressor is always charged. I just shut the air valve and shut the breaker off.

Anubis
Oct 9, 2003

It's hard to keep sand out of ears this big.

Fun Shoe

I was always told that you don't want to leave air in there overnight, ever. Especially if it's going to get cold where you store your tank. Rust on the inside can lead to a pretty dangerous situation.

let it mellow
Jun 1, 2000



Dinosaur Gum

Interestingly, in my scuba training, they said to always leave some air in your tank to keep water out.

I had always emptied my compressor after being done with it and let it drain until that course. I have no idea why I did that since, as was said earlier, what's it going to do? But, I did it anyway. Ever since the scuba class, I leave it at 30 or 40 PSI when done, but this thread is making me question that too.

stubblyhead
Sep 13, 2007

That is treason, Johnny!

Fun Shoe

jackyl posted:

Interestingly, in my scuba training, they said to always leave some air in your tank to keep water out.

I had always emptied my compressor after being done with it and let it drain until that course. I have no idea why I did that since, as was said earlier, what's it going to do? But, I did it anyway. Ever since the scuba class, I leave it at 30 or 40 PSI when done, but this thread is making me question that too.

It's been a while since I did any diving, but as I recall the logic there is that by keeping some pressure in, water from the outside environment can't get inside the tank (bad thing). I think the concern here is condensation.

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

Thanks for the replies folks, some good things to think about

An automatic drain would be nice, have to look more into those. HF one is only $10 but has some pretty poor reviews http://www.harborfreight.com/automa...-kit-46960.html


Just bought the Makita MAC700 compressor from Amazon ($175 shipped). It was either this or the cheapy Porter Cable pancake and although the PC would've been nicely portable for trim jobs, I think the beefier Makita will be more reliable and quiet (oiled vs oil-less)

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


Anubis posted:

I was always told that you don't want to leave air in there overnight, ever. Especially if it's going to get cold where you store your tank. Rust on the inside can lead to a pretty dangerous situation.

Most of the moisture in the air comes out after you pump it up to 125+psi and let it cool back to ambient. Any condensation from a drop in temperature would happen no matter the tank pressure. Refilling the tank from empty and letting the air cool would cause far more condensation than any temperature change.

You want to always keep at least a tiny bit of pressure in a tank to keep all the valves sealed tight to keep dust and insects out. Some valve assemblies can also corrode if their mating surfaces are left open to the air, causing them to leak.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



truncated aardvar posted:

I want to put a shout out to my Stanley ratchet screwdriver...


I love this screwdriver. I have one for work and have been looking to get one for home. So nice to have all the bits in the head of the unit and the ratcheting action works very well.

tworavens
Oct 5, 2009


GEMorris posted:

Nice, that's a good saw and you saved $120. Heavy, but what worm drive isn't?

'Heavy is good, Heavy is reliable. If it doesn't work you can always hit him with it.'

I'm looking to buy a cheap battery operated drill. I saw this at Harbor Freight: http://www.harborfreight.com/power-...-kit-65930.html

Anyone have one? I'm not going to be building houses with it right now, I'm a student and will be using it for class projects and mock-ups. But later this year I might be working again. I don't want to buy it if its going to crap out in three months, and I'd be willing to spend about $100 for something that is really good. I'm studying to be an electrician btw.

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


$100 give you something like http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hard...catalogId=10053

I don't know this drill or even the brand but Ridgid is typically industry-type quality. It's hard to find something for $100 but if you spend $200 you get a nice drill, a charger and typically two 3Ah li-ion batteries. DeWalt, Milwaukee, Hitachi, Bosch, Makita, Ridgid and a couple of brands more. Stay clear of Harbor Freight-type tools.

Ahz
Jun 17, 2001
PUT MY CART BACK? I'M BETTER THAN THAT AND YOU! WHERE IS MY BUTLER?!

Don't bother with the ultra-budget batter powered drills if you want to use it for more than one project. I've gone through 4 budget drills over the past 4 years and I decided to bite the bullet and buy a Rigid combo pack which included a drill/driver and an impact driver for $200. After using this and my neighbor's DeWalt, it's night and day from the cheap Black and Decker, Campbell Hausfeld, or Kawasaki junk I used before.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







tworavens posted:

'Heavy is good, Heavy is reliable. If it doesn't work you can always hit him with it.'

I'm looking to buy a cheap battery operated drill. I saw this at Harbor Freight: http://www.harborfreight.com/power-...-kit-65930.html

Anyone have one? I'm not going to be building houses with it right now, I'm a student and will be using it for class projects and mock-ups. But later this year I might be working again. I don't want to buy it if its going to crap out in three months, and I'd be willing to spend about $100 for something that is really good. I'm studying to be an electrician btw.
Cordless drills have a finite life; batteries don't last very long between charges when you start doing anything heavy, and die completely after a scant few years. With new drills priced cheaper than replacement batteries, I can't tell you how many old drills I've thrown away... They are incredibly convenient, though. I've bought very good drills, and thrown them away just the same. I did solder up a new battery pack once, but it's still quite costly to DIY and a real pain in the rear end.

My advice is to get a cheap cordless drill, one that'll work fine for 90% of what you need but you don't mind throwing away in 5 years. Chances are it'll do everything you need it to. If you find this isn't enough, get a good corded one for heavier tasks.

grover fucked around with this message at 15:53 on Mar 4, 2011

emocrat
Feb 28, 2007
Sidewalk Technology

Does anyone have any advice on small powered sanders? I am a little lost on this one.

This style looks pretty good to me, I like the idea of the point for corners.
http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hard...catalogId=10053


However the brands that I associate with more quality products (Dewalt, Milwaukee) only seem to offer round or square options, none with a point.

Is the point not actually that useful? Or maybe just buy a cheap pointed one for corners and a better quality round random orbital for the rest?

Jihad Me At Hello
Apr 23, 2002

by FactsAreUseless


Fun Shoe

Think this is gonna be the best tool bag I'll have owned. Picked it up at a local HVAC supply house after reading reviews online. I've used many styles of bags over the years but need something that organizes and protects. It was $140 after tax but you can't beat a 5 year warranty. It's the Veto Pro Pac XL. Build quality is very nice even though it's made in China. Here's some pictures with my most commonly used hand tools.



Personal image hosting.

Jihad Me At Hello fucked around with this message at 16:35 on Mar 4, 2011

Iskariot
May 25, 2010


New li-ion batteries which are cared for and stored properly will last you very long. A professional tool will generally come with better quality batteries (the cells may be the same but the electronics will be better). The chargers are also tending to your battery.

I have an old Bosch IXO that I got when they first came out, 13 years ago:
This little bugger is still going strong. I replaced it with a professional grade one a few years ago but the little IXO has seen it's share of abuse and I sure as poo poo didn't take care of the battery.

Jihad Me At Hello
Apr 23, 2002

by FactsAreUseless


Fun Shoe

tworavens posted:

'Heavy is good, Heavy is reliable. If it doesn't work you can always hit him with it.'

I'm looking to buy a cheap battery operated drill. I saw this at Harbor Freight: http://www.harborfreight.com/power-...-kit-65930.html

Anyone have one? I'm not going to be building houses with it right now, I'm a student and will be using it for class projects and mock-ups. But later this year I might be working again. I don't want to buy it if its going to crap out in three months, and I'd be willing to spend about $100 for something that is really good. I'm studying to be an electrician btw.

The 18v Porter Cable battery drills are around $100 and are pretty good. I used one for about 6 months to drill out panels until someone stole it. Much more solid than a Ryobi.

GEMorris
Aug 28, 2002

Glory To the Order!


Iskariot posted:

$100 give you something like http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hard...catalogId=10053

I don't know this drill or even the brand but Ridgid is typically industry-type quality. It's hard to find something for $100 but if you spend $200 you get a nice drill, a charger and typically two 3Ah li-ion batteries. DeWalt, Milwaukee, Hitachi, Bosch, Makita, Ridgid and a couple of brands more. Stay clear of Harbor Freight-type tools.

I have the specific drill he linked to, it is a good tool.

Also: seconding the rest of Iskariot's advice.

Circus Pies!
Feb 11, 2011

I thought you were getting me a pie shaped like a clown, instead you mangled my dick!

I've had an 18 volt Dewalt drill for 5 years and use it at least 3 times a week on average. The batteries still hold just as much charge as when I first bought it. I think it might have something to do with the fact that the drill came with 2 batteries and I also have an 18 volt cordless circular saw so my batteries don't get charged twice in a row.

I have quite a few cheep Harbor Freight tools that I use quite often but I use my drill more than any other tool I have so I would recommend not cheeping out on a drill.

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

dwoloz posted:

Thanks for the replies folks, some good things to think about

An automatic drain would be nice, have to look more into those. HF one is only $10 but has some pretty poor reviews http://www.harborfreight.com/automa...-kit-46960.html


Just bought the Makita MAC700 compressor from Amazon ($175 shipped). It was either this or the cheapy Porter Cable pancake and although the PC would've been nicely portable for trim jobs, I think the beefier Makita will be more reliable and quiet (oiled vs oil-less)

If you upgrade the flex line to braided stainless or solid copper, its a much less crappy system.

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