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Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


Queadlunn posted:

That one sadly won't let me do metal work or proper milling.

Just make sure you have a steady hand and a set of calipers

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Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



Queadlunn posted:

Good to know! I'll check in over there too then.


That one sadly won't let me do metal work or proper milling. I'd love to have a wood lathe too some day but our limited space makes it really hard to have a functioning semblance of a workshop space...

Thatís not entirely true. You said ďsome metalsĒ and while you canít do steel, stuff like aluminum and brass is do-able by hand if you go nice and slow. To wit:

Bad Munki posted:


I like to make tap handles, a few times on commission (a matching set of eight in spalted tamarind, another set in tulipwood and black palm, etc, although I'm not a reliable project-finisher, so I try not to go down that road too often), but mostly for fun (a spent antiaircraft shell, a horseshoe, 2 points of deer antler, a 9Ē dildo, the list goes on). Hereís a handle I put together, styled after a honeybee. A friend took up bee keeping a year or two ago, and this fall, we were working on rebuilding his kegerator, while he has a batch of mead from his own bees that should be coming online right about now. So I figured a nice faucet handle to match would be good for Christmas, and here we are. Solid walnut and brass.



The concept I drew up to work from. I think the end result was pretty close! Itís not precisely patterned like the bees in question, I think in reality the stripes would be the other way? But artistic license prevails, and mostly I wanted the very end tip to be brass.



Started with some quarter inch brass bar for the butt stripes. Just needed a bunch of coins, easy enough. Used a 1-1/8" hole saw so I'd have a little buffer for the final 1" goal.



Good to go! The hole in the middle from the hole saw mandrel is ideal, since some threaded rod will run through the whole piece for strength.



The stack for the bee butt roughly assembled. Quarter inch walnut between the brass coins, and then just ground down real quick to size on the belt sander. Made sure to cut the walnut so the grain runs the short way, that way thereís no end grain facing out. The brass glue up will alleviate any normal strength concerns. Superglue to lock everything in place. Loctite ultra control gel did the trick, and it apparently has some rubbery stuff to make it a little less brittle.



Taken down to round on the lathe. Turning this by hand, first time trying that with metal. Itís not ideal! But if you go slow and careful, itíll do, at least with something soft like brass. Regular wood tools, and also a metal file came into play when I actually started shaping it.



Just a little test to see how itíll do polishing the brass with the wood there. Not bad at all! Gotta be careful to not load the wood up with dirt in the process.



When I started this, I only had the 1/4Ē bar of brass. Needed some thick rod for the body, and nobody around town had it. So I had to order it, and the darn thing arrived on the 23rd, about 5PM, giving me 24 hours to get the rest of the piece assembled, turned, polished, finished, wrapped, and delivered. (I was applying the last coats of finish a little after midnight, but I made it!) Here weíve skipped a few steps, but I started with a 1Ē brass rod, drilled through the center, lopped an inch off the end, glued it onto the threaded core, cut a 1/2Ē chunk of walnut and glued that on, then shaped it down to the final shape. Only thing not included is the last little brass piece on the end of the butt, that came very last as I couldnít work that and still support both ends. You can also see here how the walnut wasnít quite the color it needed to be. Too light by far in its natural state.



So we throw some danish oil with dark walnut stain on the whole thing, wipe off the excess, let it dry, and repeat three or four times. POW! The darkened walnut really makes the brass pop, and the brass itself, of course, doesnít pick up anything from the stain. Maybe a little protection from the oil once it cures. I have some renwax on its way that Iíll apply to the whole thing, but that wonít be here until after Christmas and this wonít tarnish in that short of a time, so weíre good to go!

Imgur album link: https://imgur.com/gallery/Z48tnG7

All that being said, yeah, I wish I had a metal lathe

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





Queadlunn posted:

Random question; thinking of getting a mini late that I can use in an apartment bathroom. Anyone have experience with the Taig Mini Lathe?.


I want to be able to turn plastic, wood and some metals with it and while the manufacture's site and youtube videos I've looked at make it seem well able to handle most materials up to some steels.

Your next project for this would be a rotating dual purpose diaper station. Be a groundbreaker.

Vindolanda
Feb 13, 2012

It's just like him too, y'know?


Queadlunn posted:

Good to know! I'll check in over there too then.


That one sadly won't let me do metal work or proper milling. I'd love to have a wood lathe too some day but our limited space makes it really hard to have a functioning semblance of a workshop space...

I donít have links to hand but Iíd also suggest looking at Clickspring and This Old Tonyís videos on youtube. Both (as I recall) had some good discussion about getting the most out of small lathes. You could also go the Uri Tuchman route with an old sewing machine table (donít, heíd have been driven mad if he wasnít already).

e: one other thing to keep in mind is rustproofing - you probably have thought of this but even unused bathrooms can be damp due to lack of airflow etc. Have you considered what to use on the ways and tooling?

Vindolanda fucked around with this message at 10:13 on Mar 30, 2021

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



If I want to start to invest in a power tool line (prefereabilly cordless, battery operated), which direction do I go? I don't mind getting one here and there. I have a Ryobi One drill and orbital sander, but the battery life is horrible, and I got a free extra battery that was a dud that Ryobi didn't want to swap out even though it came as a bundle, and another gifted that also was a dud. Is Dewalt a better brand? Milwaukee? Dewalt seems to have their flexvolt stuff, but some reviews say don't mix and match even though I was under the assumption using their "60V" battery with a 20v tool would just give improved run time.

KKKLIP ART fucked around with this message at 13:12 on Apr 5, 2021

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Do a search in this thread.

Top tier: Milwaukee, Makita, DeWalt
Mid tier (often for availability or selection): Bosch, Ridgid
Homeowner grade: Ryobi is really the best bet
Trash tier: mostly everything else for various reasons (lack of history, low availability, poo poo quality)

If the batteries aren't too old, Ryobi will warranty them. If they're over a year old, you're out of luck, but they're so cheap it doesn't really matter much.

I have a ton of Makita 18V, plus Milwaukee M12. My wife has some Ryobi stuff and it's great for the money and niche tools (glue gun, hedge trimmers, etc)

DrBouvenstein
Feb 28, 2007

I think I'm a doctor, but that doesn't make me a doctor. This fancy avatar does.


Basically between all the major brands, DeWalt, Milwaukee, Makita, etc...mostly just pick the color you like.

But maybe hold off on Makita...
https://toolguyd.com/makita-18v-40v-xgt-cordless-tool-incompatibility/

CarForumPoster
Jun 26, 2013
I have a high school diploma AND a hobby coin project

Now that you're sufficiently in awe, you motherfuckers shut up and let me tell you how human safety in your self driving car works in the REAL WORLD


KKKLIP ART posted:

If I want to start to invest in a power tool line (prefereabilly cordless, battery operated), which direction do I go? I don't mind getting one here and there. I have a Ryobi One drill and orbital sander, but the battery life is horrible, and I got a free extra battery that was a dud that Ryobi didn't want to swap out even though it came as a bundle, and another gifted that also was a dud. Is Dewalt a better brand? Milwaukee? Dewalt seems to have their flexvolt stuff, but some reviews say don't mix and match even though I was under the assumption using their "60V" battery with a 20v tool would just give improved run time.

What do you want to do with them. I love my Milwaukee m18 stuff (drill, driver, circ saw, 2 lights, quiklok trimmer and pole saw) but Iím a little disappointed they donít have a lawnmower since I have so many batteries now.

Also a couple hours on the string trimmer in thick vines and dirt will start it hitting thermal limits but it cools fast and the easy to wind head is pretty amazing. Iíve been super productive with it as string trimmers go.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



sharkytm posted:

Do a search in this thread.

Top tier: Milwaukee, Makita, DeWalt
Mid tier (often for availability or selection): Bosch, Ridgid
Homeowner grade: Ryobi is really the best bet
Trash tier: mostly everything else for various reasons (lack of history, low availability, poo poo quality)

If the batteries aren't too old, Ryobi will warranty them. If they're over a year old, you're out of luck, but they're so cheap it doesn't really matter much.

I have a ton of Makita 18V, plus Milwaukee M12. My wife has some Ryobi stuff and it's great for the money and niche tools (glue gun, hedge trimmers, etc)

They are over a year old for sure, but they were giving me a hard time about the warranty even with an invoice, and Home Depot said they wouldnít swap it because it was for Ryobi. I think Iíll keep my drill but slowly acquire either Dewalt or Milwaukee. The warranty for Milwaukee seems really good.

As for what am I going to be doing: over the next year we are doing a Reno essentially room by room along with the standard DIY stuff. We are having to gut each room because old house and no insulation so itís more than just new tile and all that. Building a new deck, redoing a porch, etc.

KKKLIP ART fucked around with this message at 14:04 on Apr 5, 2021

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




So what tools are you planning to buy? Brand only matters for cordless, and there really aren't many tools where cordlessness gives a significant advantage.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

DrBouvenstein posted:

Basically between all the major brands, DeWalt, Milwaukee, Makita, etc...mostly just pick the color you like.

But maybe hold off on Makita...
https://toolguyd.com/makita-18v-40v-xgt-cordless-tool-incompatibility/

For a home gamer, Makita LXT is fine. Hell, the new XGT line might decrease prices on the LXT side as pros move away from it. I've beaten the crap out of my LXT gear and never had any issues (anecdotal, I know), and I'm very happy with it. If I was starting over again, I might consider Milwaukee m18 and m12 mostly because of shared chargers and the awesome selection of Milwaukee specialty tools, but Makita would be my #2 choice.

CommonShore posted:

So what tools are you planning to buy? Brand only matters for cordless, and there really aren't many tools where cordlessness gives a significant advantage.

I don't think I could disagree more. I very very rarely drag out any of my corded stuff anymore. Full size router, table saw, chop saw... That's it. Cordless drill, impact driver, impact wrench, circsaw, sawzall, work light, jigsaw, etc, are all 100% useful and less annoying than their corded equivalents. Every once in a while I drag out my hypoid saw, I guess.

sharkytm fucked around with this message at 14:11 on Apr 5, 2021

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



Long term: drill, circular saw, sander, drywall drill, and probably a few other things I canít think of right now.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

CommonShore posted:

there really aren't many tools where cordlessness gives a significant advantage.

This is quite a take.

Have you done any work on anything in the last decade?

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




sharkytm posted:

For a home gamer, Makita LXT is fine. Hell, the new XGT line might decrease prices on the LXT side as pros move away from it. I've beaten the crap out of my LXT gear and never had any issues (anecdotal, I know), and I'm very happy with it. If I was starting over again, I might consider Milwaukee m18 and m12 mostly because of shared chargers and the awesome selection of Milwaukee specialty tools, but Makita would be my #2 choice.


I don't think I could disagree more. I very very rarely drag out any of my corded stuff anymore. Full size router, table saw, chop saw... That's it. Cordless drill, impact driver, impact wrench, circsaw, sawzall, work light, jigsaw, etc, are all 100% useful and less annoying than their corded equivalents. Every once in a while I drag out my hypoid saw, I guess.

I'll give you the drills and drivers yeah. I guess the one where I really disagree is the circ saw, because I can't think of too many cases where I'm using it without setting up a work station anyway, so I just run a cord. And if it's just one or two cuts in most cases I'll just blast it with a hand saw.

What's the battery life and cutting power like on the cordless circ saws and sawzalls anyway? I've heard complaints.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

CommonShore posted:

What's the battery life and cutting power like on the cordless circ saws and sawzalls anyway? I've heard complaints.

You must be hearing complaints from 2002. Did they page you or send a fax?

Seriously...I do'nt know what you're on about, but it's clear you've not used any modern cordless tools. Since Lithion Ion has been a thing they've been fine. They've been exceptional since DC brushless became a thing.

E: To be very specifc, my dewalt batteries charge faster than I can kill them on either a circ saw or a sawzall.

Motronic fucked around with this message at 14:22 on Apr 5, 2021

Harry Potter on Ice
Nov 4, 2006
Someone on the internet doesn't like me





CommonShore posted:

What's the battery life and cutting power like on the cordless circ saws and sawzalls anyway? I've heard complaints.

Sawzalls at least you ain't doing poo poo with a cordless one. The last person I read in here said their circular saw made like 3 full cuts of a sheet of plywood (which is fine for some people obv) before dying so yes go off motronic

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Harry Potter on Ice posted:

Sawzalls at least you ain't doing poo poo with a cordless one. The last person I read in here said their circular saw made like 3 full cuts of a sheet of plywood (which is fine for some people obv) before dying so yes go off motronic

So yet someone else who heard from someone using 10+ year old nicad tools with spanked batteries.........

This is not how modern cordless tools operate.

E: it's not even how old nicad tools operated when the batteries were fresh.

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




Motronic posted:

You must be hearing complaints from 2002. Did they page you or send a fax?

Seriously...I do'nt know what you're on about, but it's clear you've not used any modern cordless tools. Since Lithion Ion has been a thing they've been fine. They've been exceptional since DC brushless became a thing.

I don't use a ton of cordless tools, but I have some DC brushless drills, which I find have less drilling power than my cheapo corded drill. The complaint was specifically about the Ryobi circ saw, and the most recent complaint was made in reference to a brand new one in the store, as in "I bought this and I use it for like 5 cuts and it dies."

Dr. Habibi
Sep 24, 2009



Harry Potter on Ice posted:

Sawzalls at least you ain't doing poo poo with a cordless one. The last person I read in here said their circular saw made like 3 full cuts of a sheet of plywood (which is fine for some people obv) before dying so yes go off motronic

This seems wildly off. Cordless sawzalls are goddamn great (donít use <3Ah batteries).

Re:circ saws, if you get one of the beefier saws (Makitaís dual battery rear handle), they can absolutely tear rear end for quite a bit more than 3 cuts of that plywood, by an order of magnitude.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




KKKLIP ART posted:

If I want to start to invest in a power tool line (prefereabilly cordless, battery operated), which direction do I go? I don't mind getting one here and there. I have a Ryobi One drill and orbital sander, but the battery life is horrible, and I got a free extra battery that was a dud that Ryobi didn't want to swap out even though it came as a bundle, and another gifted that also was a dud. Is Dewalt a better brand? Milwaukee? Dewalt seems to have their flexvolt stuff, but some reviews say don't mix and match even though I was under the assumption using their "60V" battery with a 20v tool would just give improved run time.

are they yellow nicad batteries?
Ive got their handheld battery powered orbital sander and my biggest bitch is when I use a shopvac attached to it sucking fine drywall dust I need to wear gloves as I was getting shocked becuaes of the lack of grounding. Even the 1.5Ah battery gave me enough to work on my walls etc.

I have many Ryobi tools and even the 1.5 AH lithium batteries are enough to handle (over)building a set of 2x4 shelves. I also use the 1.5AH on the sander due to the size and weight, and I had no issue with about 15-20 min of work on it.
My 3-4AH batteries are saved for my recip saw generally.

edit since there's more posts:
I have the $150 Cordless brushless recip saw from Ryobi and 3ah batteries. It' did a better job at cutting my deck planks than my lovely corded skill circ saw. Ihave used it to take out bushes in the backyard, cut off other stuff etc etc. It works well. I'm sold on never having a corded recip saw again.

tater_salad fucked around with this message at 15:08 on Apr 5, 2021

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


I had an old NiCad Ryobi small circular saw and it couldn't get through more than one cut in a 2x4. The NiCad drill was great though for home use. Even drilled out rusted bolts.

My circular saw cuts are so infrequent that I'm happy with my plug-in one. However, it would be more convenient to have no cord for long rips on plywood.

I replaced the Ryobi set with a cheap Black and Decker 20v lithium drill/driver, and a bunch of plug in tools. The battery lasted roughly forever. It was powerful enough to drill most thing, drive most things, hang pictures, build shelving, and many other things as well. I blew up the drill using a 2-in hole saw through 2x6s without letting it cool down.

I got angry enough to spend a lot of money and replaced it with Milwaukee fuel 18 volt drill and driver. This thing is too powerful, but it is incredibly pleasant to use. I ended up getting a 12 volt Milwaukee screwdriver to supplement these because the 18 volt fuel will blow out Ikea furniture and other delicate work even on the lowest torque setting. And with the 5ah battery it came with, it's tiring to use for extended periods.

I don't think I can go back from a premium brand after feeling how nice and smooth everything operates. I ended up getting the Fuel Hackzall because I'm always cutting up random poo poo. And then the Fuel Leaf blower, which strips the sand from between my patio pavers.

I have no doubt in my mind the modern lithium tools are as powerful as their plug-in compadres. However, my full size Sawzall will cut quicker than the handheld Hackzall. And my plug in hammer drill will put a 3/8 hole through 4 inches of concrete slightly faster than my Milwaukee drill. The three seconds you save will be eaten up by dragging around extension cords, however.

Milwaukee typically comes out on top in benchmarks, but those are just benchmark tests. You probably won't notice in real world application between the top brands.

Rigid seems to have a good battery warranty. Don't sleep on Kobalt.

Ryobi is going to be your best cost performance value, and is probably 100% adequate.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



I've gotten hours of use out of a 4ah battery in a ryobi sawzall, chopped back a gardens worth of bushes and small trees and then took the shed apart with it.

SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007


Hair Elf

Harry Potter on Ice posted:

Sawzalls at least you ain't doing poo poo with a cordless one. The last person I read in here said their circular saw made like 3 full cuts of a sheet of plywood (which is fine for some people obv) before dying so yes go off motronic

This has got to be a troll post. My M18 Hackzall is more powerful than my old corded Sawzall. The technology is ready and the fact that the professionals are mostly cordless now should make that obvious.

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




Well I'm glad to hear that perhaps my reservations were misplaced

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


Don't be a slave and buy into the proprietary battery systems. Get one of these and all of your super cheap corded tools become portable!
https://www.amazon.com/Westinghouse-iGen160s-Portable-Generator-Included/dp/B0823BB4RV/

MrOnBicycle
Jan 18, 2008
Wait wat?

sharkytm posted:

Do a search in this thread.

Top tier: Milwaukee, Makita, DeWalt
Mid tier (often for availability or selection): Bosch, Ridgid
Homeowner grade: Ryobi is really the best bet
Trash tier: mostly everything else for various reasons (lack of history, low availability, poo poo quality)

If the batteries aren't too old, Ryobi will warranty them. If they're over a year old, you're out of luck, but they're so cheap it doesn't really matter much.

I have a ton of Makita 18V, plus Milwaukee M12. My wife has some Ryobi stuff and it's great for the money and niche tools (glue gun, hedge trimmers, etc)

Are you refering to blue or green Bosch?

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




My corded drill broke my hand but no wimpy little cordless tool has ever broken any of my bones

I mostly work in my shop where I have cords everywhere, but if I did more work on/under/outside houses I would definitely appreciate cordless stuff more. Cordless stuff is lightyears better than a decade ago and definitely has plenty of juice for most uses but corded stuff seems to have a little more rear end behind it?

SpartanIvy posted:

This has got to be a troll post. My M18 Hackzall is more powerful than my old corded Sawzall. The technology is ready and the fact that the professionals are mostly cordless now should make that obvious.
I refuse to believe anything could be more elbow-shatteringly powerful than my old corded 10lb, made in USA, 15A, heavy doody Super Sawzall

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

corded stuff seems to have a little more rear end behind it?

This is also outdated until you get into something on the scale of SDS rotary hammers. At least in professional tools.

I've been replacing my air impacts with cordless stuff. And I'm not one to screw with things that just work, but these are simply better.

My DeWalt 20v Max hammer drill will absolutely break my wrist if I use it wrong just the same as the old corded one I've got.

SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007


Hair Elf

Motronic posted:

This is also outdated until you get into something on the scale of SDS rotary hammers. At least in professional tools.


Can confirm. I have the 1-9/16" Milwaukee rotary hammer and its not quite up to par with the corded models but drat is it convenient. I've heard their newer 1-3/4" is way better though.

canyoneer
Sep 13, 2005


I only have canyoneyes for you


Mr. Mambold posted:

Your next project for this would be a rotating dual purpose diaper station. Be a groundbreaker.

I'm imagining a roating, progressive ammunition reloading press, but for diapers.


hit me up parents of twins I have ideas

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


Yeah bitches, I don't know what the gently caress y'all talking about with this new fangled cordless poo poo for. I got my steam powered table saw what be able to kick the poo poo out of any of that electricity powered BULLSHIT.
Only gotta let that boiler heat up for 3-4 hours and I can cut that one sheet of plywood or a couple crosscuts in 2x4s that are ACTUALLY TWO BY FOUR, none of this nominal poo poo that they scam you with.
If I really need power though, I break out the oxen. Them fucks can power my table saw if I'm out on a job site and while I'm at it, they'll pull my wagon and all my other tools along with it.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Motronic posted:

This is also outdated until you get into something on the scale of SDS rotary hammers. At least in professional tools.

I've been replacing my air impacts with cordless stuff. And I'm not one to screw with things that just work, but these are simply better.

My DeWalt 20v Max hammer drill will absolutely break my wrist if I use it wrong just the same as the old corded one I've got.

Yeah after I posted that I grabbed my newish brushless Dewalt drill and got a drill bit stuck in some wood and thought 'huh, this probably could actually break my hand too'

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





CommonShore posted:

Well I'm glad to hear that perhaps my reservations were misplaced

That's okay, Gen'l Custer. You go on down thar. They'll open up on you with welcome arms.


sharkytm posted:



I don't think I could disagree more. I very very rarely drag out any of my corded stuff anymore. Full size router, table saw, chop saw... That's it. Cordless drill, impact driver, impact wrench, circsaw, sawzall, work light, jigsaw, etc, are all 100% useful and less annoying than their corded equivalents. Every once in a while I drag out my hypoid saw, I guess.

I garage sold my corded Milwaukee 3/8 hammer drill last summer because. But they can pry my cold dead fingers off my hypoid saw, and I bet it's older than yours.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Yeah after I posted that I grabbed my newish brushless Dewalt drill and got a drill bit stuck in some wood and thought 'huh, this probably could actually break my hand too'

Try that in 1st gear through 3/8" metal with a 1/2" bit when it's time to break that last chip. (I was too lazy/impatient to go rent a magnetic drill press)

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Motronic posted:

Try that in 1st gear through 3/8" metal with a 1/2" bit when it's time to break that last chip. (I was too lazy/impatient to go rent a magnetic drill press)

This is exactly the situation that broke my hand the first time, but with a corded drill, lol.

I went about my business for 2 weeks going 'gosh my hand really hurts' before I fount out it was broken.

coathat
May 21, 2007



The newest fancy cordless drills have anti-kickback protection and wont even LET you break your wrist.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




coathat posted:

The newest fancy cordless drills have anti-kickback protection and wont even LET you break your wrist.

we call that pussy law 34

Uncle Enzo
Apr 28, 2008

I always wanted to be a Wizard

Relevantly, here is a pretty objective test of cordless sawzalls. Don't miss the fact that the Dewalt and Milwaukee saws outperform a corded Milwaukee sawzall. And those are the 20v tools, not the higher-end 60v saws you'd use if you were using that saw professionally.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDmagFLJqao

You can see the pretty typical result of Dewalt or Milwaukee being in first or second place with Makita following very closely, a strong finish from Ryobi, and the other cordless options he tests don't amount to much.

The same guy does a lot of very solid testing like this of cordless tools and his results mirror the thread's advice. Dewalt, Milwaukee, then Makita, or if cost is really a major problem Ryobi stuff is actually quite good for the price.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Mr. Mambold posted:

That's okay, Gen'l Custer. You go on down thar. They'll open up on you with welcome arms.

I garage sold my corded Milwaukee 3/8 hammer drill last summer because. But they can pry my cold dead fingers off my hypoid saw, and I bet it's older than yours.
I'm sure it is. Mine is a late 90s Makita. It's a monster, and only comes out if I need to cut 10+ sheets of wet PT ply or 4x4s. I have a corded drill that I just bought, a HF D-handle low-speed for mixing mortar and thinset. I'll probably sell it for 80% of what I paid in a few weeks.

MrOnBicycle posted:

Are you refering to blue or green Bosch?
Whichever, I think. Bosch has great stuff in Europe, but really limited availability and selection here in the states.

CommonShore posted:

I'll give you the drills and drivers yeah. I guess the one where I really disagree is the circ saw, because I can't think of too many cases where I'm using it without setting up a work station anyway, so I just run a cord. And if it's just one or two cuts in most cases I'll just blast it with a hand saw.

What's the battery life and cutting power like on the cordless circ saws and sawzalls anyway? I've heard complaints.
I literally can't kill my 10 year old 3AH Makita batteries with a brushless saw cutting 4x8 sheets of 1/4" FRP faster than they charge. The new 5AH ones are even better. I drove 800+ 1 1/4" Torx construction screws (new 5/8" subfloor) with a single 3AH battery on a brushless impact. I've drilled hundreds of 5/16" holes in 1/2" steel, then tapped them with a 3/8"-16 spiral point tap in the same drill.

I mean... I still use corded grinders if I need to grind a lot of weld or a ton of steel. Anything small or using a cutoff wheel? Cordless, and not even a brushless motor. It won't catch and shatter the wheel, and I don't have to worry about the drat cord getting tangled or cut. If I was a pipeliner, yeah, I'd be using corded 100% of the time, but I'm not.

The crew that installed 600sqft of maple flooring in my house a few weeks ago: a pair of twinstack plug in compressors for the flooring nailers, every other tool was cordless: table saw and chop saw were both DeWalt FlexVolt, drills, drivers, and circ saws were all DeWalt 20V. M12 OMT for undercutting door jambs. They did use air-powered nailers for the topnailing, saying that the cordless ones weren't great.

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angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



Harry Potter on Ice posted:

Sawzalls at least you ain't doing poo poo with a cordless one. The last person I read in here said their circular saw made like 3 full cuts of a sheet of plywood (which is fine for some people obv) before dying so yes go off motronic

This is so wrong I have to quote it again. I sold my corded sawzall cause I don't see any advantage in it whatsoever.

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