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Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

Got these for my computer in a dented box sale online for cheap. Only plan on using them on my PC for gaming. My question is: what is that kind of surround sound hookup called, with the orange, black, green audio in? My computer has those outputs, but I've never seen that sort of setup on any sort of reciever or the like, and I'd like a name for it.

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Hob_Gadling
Jul 6, 2007

by Jeffrey of YOSPOS


Grimey Drawer

3,5mm miniature jack. It's the same plug that many MP3 players use.

Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

Hob_Gadling posted:

3,5mm miniature jack. It's the same plug that many MP3 players use.

So is the multiple 3.5mm jacks for surround sound something computers only do? Never seen it on consoles, tvs, or receivers. They all used to be optical and I guess HDMI is the standard now.

Naffer
Oct 26, 2004

Not a good chemist

Chin Strap posted:

So is the multiple 3.5mm jacks for surround sound something computers only do? Never seen it on consoles, tvs, or receivers. They all used to be optical and I guess HDMI is the standard now.

The three 3.5mm jacks are equivalent to the 6 RCA connectors you can often find on receivers. For computers, they put two channels on each 3.5mm plug, so you get one for front L/R, one for back L/R, and one for center/subwoofer. They're analogue, so you could use rca to 3.5mm connectors (img below) to hook that speaker setup up to something with 6 RCA preouts.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

DragonKeeper
Aug 4, 2004
MOLE GAVE ME THIS ACCOUNT OK GUYS

Since Newegg is running a seemingly pretty decent sale right now I'm thinking about taking the plunge for my first set up. I'm looking for some input however.

The receiver I was originally thinking about is no longer in stock, and since it looks like Onkyo has replaced it with "the next greatest thing­™", it may not be coming back into stock ever. I'm ok with this this since all the features I wanted the HT-RC260 for are still there with a few extra at only a slightly higher cost. The HT-RC360 however is new, very new apparently, so any reviews or testimonials are completely non-existent. I took a picture of the space I have to work with, and while it will fit on a shelf I do worry some about ventilation and heat issues if this thing is always on.

http://fi.somethingawful.com/is/img857/3969/imag0035ai.jpg

As for the speakers, the space can really only do a 3.1, which I think will be fine for me. Unless I was to wall mount some very small speakers for the surrounds and run the wires through the floor into the basement and back up. I was looking at getting 2x Polk Monitor 60 Series II floor-standing towers. But then I saw that for a few dollars(after shipping) more they had some open-box Monitor 70 Series II towers. Now I've never bought anything open-box from Newegg before, but this would save me $140 off retail if I wanted the 70s over the 60s. My question here is, would it really be worth it to try the open box 70s? I may or may not get a sub right off the bat, and was planning to run them bi-amped if this makes any difference. I know from the specs that the 70s are supposed to have a better lower end frequency response, but is this something that just looks good on paper? Will I be likely to actually notice the difference enough to take the gamble? (For context, I work in a movie theater and deal with projection equipment constantly. Mostly its the visual side of the equation, but the sound needs fixing from time to time as well, so I do have some ear for it). I am also thinking about getting a CS1 Series II center speaker, mostly since it will also barely fit onto the space. This should be a good match for either the 60, or the 70, yes?

One last thing. The 2 available shelves are 7.5"h x 18.5"w x 18"d, and 7.75"h x 18.5"w x 18"d. I haven't tried it yet, but I think I can move the shelf that the blu-ray is on all the way down and get the same space to move the center up a few inches closer to the bottom of the screen. Would that difference really be noticeable?

Wow, that was a lot of words I just wrote there, but this would represent a not insignificant monetary investment for me. So comments, advice or other assistance would be greatly appreciated.

edit: Well the open box 70s are gone now and the ht-rc360 is now $50 more than it was last night. Maybe I'll just get the ht-rc260 from Amazon instead. Slightly less future proof, but about a hundred bucks cheaper. What really kinda bums me out is that I just found out that Newegg had 70s on sale LAST week new for $169, oh well. I guess my question still stands about the heat & ventilation of the receiver, and the placement of the center. I also found an old sub that came with a PC speaker set that I think I can use. It's NEC brand of all things, but should be ok after the audyssey auto EQ right?

DragonKeeper fucked around with this message at 16:36 on May 16, 2011

Hob_Gadling
Jul 6, 2007

by Jeffrey of YOSPOS


Grimey Drawer

DragonKeeper posted:

My question here is, would it really be worth it to try the open box 70s?

Impossible to say. Open box is not a big deal since speakers are sturdy (although you may have a scratch or two on the speakers) and can last for a long time. The big question is, do you think it's worth the price difference? Even if it's $150 more to get the speakers you like, I think it's worth it. For reference, I've had my current speakers for over a decade now.

quote:

I know from the specs that the 70s are supposed to have a better lower end frequency response, but is this something that just looks good on paper?

No, there's a difference but probably not quite as drastic as you may think. They won't replace a dedicated subwoofer but music will sound better. Test with Roger Millers song King of the Road and listen especially to the bass: if you can't hear the difference then there's no point. Better yet, test with music you like. It's not likely I'm gonna come over to listen Roger in your livingroom.

quote:

This should be a good match for either the 60, or the 70, yes?

I'd get CS2 for the Monitor70s.

quote:

Slightly less future proof, but about a hundred bucks cheaper.


As long as we're going to get bang for the buck, Denon AVR-891 is a tough contender. Then again, I don't value features in receivers especially high. For an opposite point of view look what jonathan has written in this thread. In my humblest of opinions I'd spend the lions share of your available budget towards speakers and worry about receiver after that. If you have a budget of $1000 to spend, $600 towards the speakers and $400 towards the receiver makes sense.

quote:

I guess my question still stands about the heat & ventilation of the receiver, and the placement of the center.

I don't have any hands-on experience with the new Onkyo line, but I'd be wary about placing them anywhere they can potentially overheat. You might want to try your luck with another brand if it's going to be a tight fit.

Also, if this is the first setup you're getting and you have no experience about speakers and receivers beforehand, do yourself a favor and visit a hi-fi shop near you. Nothing I write will make half as much sense as you hearing the differences for yourself.

DragonKeeper
Aug 4, 2004
MOLE GAVE ME THIS ACCOUNT OK GUYS

Hob_Gadling posted:

Helpful stuff

Thanks for the input. It turns out the series I 70s are only a little bit more new than the series II 60s right now. Since I don't know anywhere around here I can go and listen to them in person I've been reading a lot of reviews. They look pretty good, I think I may go with them. For the center I thought about the CS2, but it won't fit on the shelf space that I've got available to me. I think for the sub issue I'll use the cheap one I've got for now and get a nicer one down the line. Space is going to be tight for any receiver I get, so I suppose I'll just have to be careful with any choice I end up making. Do you have personal experience with the Denon? How's the heat output on it? Worse comes to worse maybe I'll just mount a fan in the back of the shelf section that it'll sit on. It's only cardboard, shouldn't be hard to manage.

Hob_Gadling
Jul 6, 2007

by Jeffrey of YOSPOS


Grimey Drawer

DragonKeeper posted:

Do you have personal experience with the Denon?

My Denon AVR-1610 runs cool despite being a tight fit heightwise. It has plenty of room on all four sides and is placed in an open shelf.

I repeat the recommendation to get out there and listen before buying. You're about to spend up to $1000 for equipment that can last you 10 years or more. Are you sure you don't want to give the speakers a least a quick listen before committing?

DragonKeeper
Aug 4, 2004
MOLE GAVE ME THIS ACCOUNT OK GUYS

Hob_Gadling posted:

My Denon AVR-1610 runs cool despite being a tight fit heightwise.
I repeat the recommendation to get out there and listen before buying.

You're right. I thought about it some more and decided I shouldn't just buy the things because they're on sale. I just don't know where I can go locally to listen to the speakers/receivers that I was thinking about purchasing. It's not something I've ever done or even thought about doing before, but it is the right thing to do.

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


I wound up getting the pioneer system mentioned in this thread... The 2 tower setup and a center channel being driven by the 1020 receiver.

I was looking at the new 1021 receiver at best buy, but found a open box 1020 for $189. It had a scratch on the top with no accessories but for a greater than 50% discount i picked it up.

I checked the manual PDF and basically I got just the receiver which seems to be working great except I'll have to adjust my center channel a bit in some modes. I didn't get the little setup mic or the cables or the am fm amtenna or remote but thats no big deal.

What's a good remote setup for this receiver? I was looking at getting the logitech harmony remotes so I can tie in my direct tv box, 1020 and ps3 (with the add on for logitech remotes )...

I'm pretty happy the system sounds great for $550 out the door

Lowness 72
Jul 19, 2006
BUTTS LOL

Jade Ear Joe

I'm with dragonkeeper. I really want to pull the trigger on a pair of those Polk towers because of the price and the reviews (and I think the cherry looks great). But I'd really lime to hear them in action first. I just have no idea where I can go to listen to a pair. It seems newegg is the only one selling them.

FYI big sale on all Polk on newegg for memorial day.

film_critic
Jul 23, 2007

We don't go dancing at the club with babies. We go baby clubbing.


Lowness 72 posted:

I'm with dragonkeeper. I really want to pull the trigger on a pair of those Polk towers because of the price and the reviews (and I think the cherry looks great). But I'd really lime to hear them in action first. I just have no idea where I can go to listen to a pair. It seems newegg is the only one selling them.

FYI big sale on all Polk on newegg for memorial day.

thanks for the heads up on that sale. I'm going to pick up the monitor 60's and the cs2 center. Will report back in when they are all setup.

MMania
May 7, 2008


So I finally upgraded my old-rear end Cambridge Soundworks DTT3500 speakers to Atlantic Technology's 2400 set (had already upgraded to a 12" sub). I'm hearing ranges of sound that simply weren't there before and loving it, but I'd like to do more than just a basic calibration. Is there a way to balance out the speakers without buying a sound meter or hiring professionals?

BlueFootedBoobie
Feb 14, 2005



What's the practical difference between the Denon 1912 and 2112 besides 60 bux and an extra knob? The 2112 isn't actually out yet but from just looking at the specs there doesn't seem to be much differentiation.

Hob_Gadling
Jul 6, 2007

by Jeffrey of YOSPOS


Grimey Drawer

BlueFootedBoobie posted:

The 2112 isn't actually out yet but from just looking at the specs there doesn't seem to be much differentiation.

Looks like Audyssey MultEQ XT is the only major difference. Maybe there's some differences in build quality or something.


MMania posted:

Is there a way to balance out the speakers without buying a sound meter or hiring professionals?

Did you already run the measurement tool from your receiver? Barring that, there's not much you can do without a sound meter.

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



MMania posted:

Is there a way to balance out the speakers without buying a sound meter or hiring professionals?
There are some decent smartphone apps, your phone's microphone probably isn't good enough for doing EQ but for settling levels it should be fine.

Lowness 72
Jul 19, 2006
BUTTS LOL

Jade Ear Joe

film_critic posted:

thanks for the heads up on that sale. I'm going to pick up the monitor 60's and the cs2 center. Will report back in when they are all setup.
Just curious - why the monitor 60s vs the 70s?

Also what receiver did you pick up? Or did you already have something

film_critic
Jul 23, 2007

We don't go dancing at the club with babies. We go baby clubbing.


Lowness 72 posted:

Just curious - why the monitor 60s vs the 70s?

Also what receiver did you pick up? Or did you already have something

the 60's should be enough sound, and they were on sale for 120$/speaker from 150$/speaker (20% off) vs the 70's were 180$/speaker from 200$/speaker (10% off) so it was a better deal to get the 60's. I had thought about getting the 70's for more money at the original price, but when the 60's were 120$ cheaper per set... i'd just assume save the money. I also got the cs2 over the cs20 because from what i can tell its the same speaker for 50$ less...

i'll also be getting a subwoofer soon so i'm not to worried about the 8hz range difference in the bass.

I have a harmon kardon 7.1 receiver from a few years ago that runs fine. i think the the 240 version?
http://www.amazon.com/Harman-AVR-24...06271217&sr=8-1
This?

film_critic fucked around with this message at 21:28 on May 24, 2011

JHomer722
Jul 30, 2006

And you, you ridiculous people, you expect me to help you.



I currently have an old Sony HTIB which has been serviceable, but am looking to upgrade, although my budget is still relatively low. For now, I'm focused on receivers; I almost bought the Onkyo TX-SR309 because it's currently on sale for $200, but balked because I haven't done enough research on alternatives. Additionally, there aren't many current reviews on Amazon to gauge its quality. For about $50 more, there's also the Onkyo TXSR508. I like some of the additional features on the TXSR508, like Zone 2 and ProLogic II, but the Amazon reviews raise quality concerns, so I'm hesitant.

I don't have illusions about how a budget receiver stacks up against mid or high range ones, but the included features seem to fit my needs. I'll concern myself with speakers at a later date, but do either of those choices jump out as exceptionally good deals, or should I bide my time and invest more time to research or save up for a solid mid-range receiver?

Edit: After reading over the threat, I actually found a better deal on the Pioneer VSX-820-K recommended early on. Glad I didn't pull the trigger on the Onkyo.

JHomer722 fucked around with this message at 00:47 on May 26, 2011

_aaron
Jul 24, 2007
The underscore is silent.

Is there an easy way to tell if a receiver does analog-to-digital conversion? Is that even the proper term for being able to hook up various digital (e.g., HDMI from a PS3) and analog (e.g., compenent cables from a Wii) to the receiver and running a single HDMI cable to the TV? I haven't seen those exact words mentioned in many receiver specifications, and I find myself looking at reviews to determine whether or not a given unit has that capability. Are there other keywords I should be looking for?

jonathan
Jul 3, 2005
Probation
Can't post for 28 days!


_aaron posted:

Is there an easy way to tell if a receiver does analog-to-digital conversion? Is that even the proper term for being able to hook up various digital (e.g., HDMI from a PS3) and analog (e.g., compenent cables from a Wii) to the receiver and running a single HDMI cable to the TV? I haven't seen those exact words mentioned in many receiver specifications, and I find myself looking at reviews to determine whether or not a given unit has that capability. Are there other keywords I should be looking for?

Well, it technically does digital to analogue. You need to look for a receiver with HDMI inputs, and an HDMI output. There are other sound-only digital connections as well that would come built in, but if a device has hdmi, and you have a spare port on the receiver, use hdmi.

On a side note, even the cheap home theatre in a box stuff has hdmi switching now a days.

jonathan
Jul 3, 2005
Probation
Can't post for 28 days!


Geared Hub posted:

I didn't get the little setup mic

You should get a mic. Either call pioneer and tell them your's broke or find one on ebay or something. The difference in sound is noticeable, especially if your room is less than desirable for speaker placement and acoustics.

Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

After doing some listening I've decided to get the pioneer speakers that jonathan recommends. Probably just the pair of floor speakers and the center for now, not sure what I want for surround speakers. However jonathan, you say the subwoofer is only alright and that you can get better bang for your buck with a different one. suggestions?

Doc Spratley
Mar 4, 2007
Miskatonic U. Alumni

Chin Strap posted:

subwoofer . suggestions?

What sort of price range would you like to keep it under?

Under 200 there are the entry level Dayton and Bic models.

Also popular is the Bic Acoustech PL-200 available Here and Here online. A best price offer of 279 will usually net one.

The also popular and slightly older Bic F-12 will run around 220.

lavasubs.com have been growing in popularity lately - they offer a discount to AV science forum members (a busy forum with lots of great info), so it's worth just signing up a free account there to save $.

Stepping up a notch, the very highly regarded Hsu subs are having a sale on their STF-2 at 319, which would beat the above subs.

On par with Hsu quality would be subs from SVS, Elemental Designs, Epik, Rythmik, Funky Waves, JTR, Danley, Seaton, Chase Home Theatre.

For interests sake, here is a monster thread dedicated to those Pioneer speakers you are getting. Have a look at the subwoofer section while you are over there.

Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

What exactly does a 300 dollar sub get you over something cheaper? I don't quite understand differences in all them. Like what would I miss from getting something in the under 200 category?

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



Chin Strap posted:

What exactly does a 300 dollar sub get you over something cheaper? I don't quite understand differences in all them. Like what would I miss from getting something in the under 200 category?
Usually higher quality parts, more powerful or efficent amps, better design/more even sound, better adjustability, better reliability, better customer service.

Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

Lets say that I'm on the first floor of a three floor house turned into apartments. I'm not interested in too much bass because I don't want to piss off neighbors. Would the pioneer sub be fine in that case?

EDIT: Note I do not share a wall with anyone or live above anyone, just below people. I just have never had a home theater system before and I don't know how much sub sound travels upwards. Does it really? If not I have no objections getting a 300ish sub then.

Chin Strap fucked around with this message at 13:11 on May 31, 2011

Hob_Gadling
Jul 6, 2007

by Jeffrey of YOSPOS


Grimey Drawer

Chin Strap posted:

Lets say that I'm on the first floor of a three floor house turned into apartments. I'm not interested in too much bass because I don't want to piss off neighbors. Would the pioneer sub be fine in that case?

Impossible to say. So much depends on the construction of the building.
You can try to isolate the room with acoustic materials, good feet under the subwoofer, sandbox etc. They only do so much, however. Can you test how well bass carries around the building with a bass test record and your current speakers?

Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

Hob_Gadling posted:

Impossible to say. So much depends on the construction of the building.
You can try to isolate the room with acoustic materials, good feet under the subwoofer, sandbox etc. They only do so much, however. Can you test how well bass carries around the building with a bass test record and your current speakers?

Current speakers are just the built-in tv ones. No bass to speak of. Ill just get the better sub even if i cant use it to full capacity.

jonathan
Jul 3, 2005
Probation
Can't post for 28 days!


Chin Strap posted:

What exactly does a 300 dollar sub get you over something cheaper? I don't quite understand differences in all them. Like what would I miss from getting something in the under 200 category?

Accuracy, punch and it will extend lower. Cheap subs have trouble playing tones into the low 30hz range. Decent subs will go down to the low 20's. The really good ones will go into the teens and make you feel like you're drowning.

I really enjoy my Klipsch Sub 12. It can be found on craigslist for a little over $200 used, and extends down to about 21hz. After that it falls off.

DragonKeeper
Aug 4, 2004
MOLE GAVE ME THIS ACCOUNT OK GUYS

jonathan posted:

Accuracy, punch and it will extend lower. Cheap subs have trouble playing tones into the low 30hz range. Decent subs will go down to the low 20's. The really good ones will go into the teens and make you feel like you're drowning.

I really enjoy my Klipsch Sub 12. It can be found on craigslist for a little over $200 used, and extends down to about 21hz. After that it falls off.

Slightly off-topic amusing anecdote. After the release of Batman The Dark Knight, a number of IMAX theaters had issues with blown subs(I lost 2 of my 6, those are fun to change). This was not due as they had originally thought to an issue of running the volume too hot per se, but it was in fact due to a mixing... well... fault where frequencies too low to be heard were left in the sub track erroneously. Since IMAX theaters generally tend to run some really nice equipment, it did its best to pump it out anyways and destroyed a lot of drivers in the process. But man did that movie sound (and look -- especially the 15/70 IMAX stuff) good. http://fi.somethingawful.com/is/img28/44...ehindscreen.jpg Here's a shot I took during the last (and only) screen replacement. To give you an idea for scale, the lower platform has 6 18" subs and is roughly 15 feet off the ground. The top most channel is around 45 feet up by comparison. It is accessible by ladder only. I was up there twice; never again.

Back on topic... I made a terrible mockup of the setup I am considering(I am not good at image manipulation). http://fi.somethingawful.com/is/img27/3439/avmockup.jpg That's an Onkyo HT-RC360, 2 Polk Monitor 60 Series II Towers, and 1 Polk CS1 Series II Center. I've got an old generic sub which should hold me over for the time being. All equipment I -- er, added -- is roughly the right scale compared to the equipment in the original image. So even though I would like to get the CS2 center, I do not have the room for it on those shelves.

Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

So I've purchased the 3.0 Pioneer setup jonathon recommended on the first page, along with a VSX 921-K receiver. Still debating about subwoofers. It just feels kind of silly buying a 300 dollar subwoofer for speakers that I spend 280 on. Im thinking I'll just go with this Polk 10" for now and upgrade later if I find it lacking. Tired of doing so much research

Thanks all, I'll be sure to post pictures and a trip report when it all gets here.

Erwin
Feb 17, 2006



DragonKeeper posted:

Slightly off-topic amusing anecdote. After the release of Batman The Dark Knight, a number of IMAX theaters had issues with blown subs(I lost 2 of my 6, those are fun to change). This was not due as they had originally thought to an issue of running the volume too hot per se, but it was in fact due to a mixing... well... fault where frequencies too low to be heard were left in the sub track erroneously. Since IMAX theaters generally tend to run some really nice equipment, it did its best to pump it out anyways and destroyed a lot of drivers in the process. But man did that movie sound (and look -- especially the 15/70 IMAX stuff) good. http://fi.somethingawful.com/is/img28/44...ehindscreen.jpg Here's a shot I took during the last (and only) screen replacement. To give you an idea for scale, the lower platform has 6 18" subs and is roughly 15 feet off the ground. The top most channel is around 45 feet up by comparison. It is accessible by ladder only. I was up there twice; never again.

Here's an off-topic question: why is the sound in theaters so god-damned loud? I mean, I like loud, good sounding systems, but some theaters push it to the point of being painful, and I'm positive they're exceeding OSHA limits. Has any theater gotten in trouble for this?

I feel like there's a point at which a soundtrack doesn't sound as good because the system is overloading your ears. I think some theaters put in their system and then just crank it up to 100% without putting any thought into it.

DragonKeeper
Aug 4, 2004
MOLE GAVE ME THIS ACCOUNT OK GUYS

Erwin posted:

Here's an off-topic question: why is the sound in theaters so god-damned loud? I mean, I like loud, good sounding systems, but some theaters push it to the point of being painful, and I'm positive they're exceeding OSHA limits. Has any theater gotten in trouble for this?

I feel like there's a point at which a soundtrack doesn't sound as good because the system is overloading your ears. I think some theaters put in their system and then just crank it up to 100% without putting any thought into it.

All theaters should be running at a reference level of 85db regardless of soundtrack type(DTS, SDDS, Dolby Stereo, PCM Digital, etc) or movie. In theory this is the level that all movies should be mixed at in studio and how it was meant to be watched. The biggest problem I tend to find are that the theaters doesn't care to properly level their auditoriums to fall in line with that base level. Sometimes, I will admit, you will find a movie that is mixed a little hot and needs to be set back a bit. This needs to be done on a per movie basis though and can be kind of a pain at times. When our digital auditoriums were set up, we had a multiple microphone system and EQ'd everything properly at the time of install. Our digital IMAX system, and this is pretty neat, has permanent microphones mounted in the auditorium and actually runs a complete self-test and EQ adjustment program EVERY DAY before the first show runs. If anything is amiss that it can't fix, (blown driver, buzzing amp, etc) it phones home and a tech will come out and fix the issue (supposedly by the next day). Our 35mm film houses (going away soon) tend to drift more than the digitals (nature of the analog beast I guess) and we level those by hand every 3 to 4 months. Of course I can really only speak to what I know, so your mileage can and will vary from chain to chain, theater to theater. The only constant should be the digital IMAX systems which are supposed to be standardized.

Mr. Funny Pants
Apr 9, 2001



Following up on that, why is it that I can count on one hand the number of movies whose sound really worked? I'm talking beyond delivering the necessary information to the viewer. The last time I saw a movie whose sound blew me away was the horror film The Strangers. Other than that, it's just loud loud loud.

Erwin
Feb 17, 2006



DragonKeeper posted:

Our digital IMAX system, and this is pretty neat, has permanent microphones mounted in the auditorium and actually runs a complete self-test and EQ adjustment program EVERY DAY before the first show runs. If anything is amiss that it can't fix, (blown driver, buzzing amp, etc) it phones home and a tech will come out and fix the issue (supposedly by the next day).
Ok, that is pretty awesome.

I at one point considered taking a decibel meter to the theater and writing a letter if it was over OSHA limits, but I don't want to be an old fuddy-duddy. Also, it sounds like it may be more the movie's fault (in terms of a poor mix) than the theater's fault if they're just leveled to a reference level.

I like to tell myself that I'm just protective of my hearing, but it could be that I'm just a pansy.

Mr. Funny Pants posted:

Following up on that, why is it that I can count on one hand the number of movies whose sound really worked? I'm talking beyond delivering the necessary information to the viewer. The last time I saw a movie whose sound blew me away was the horror film The Strangers. Other than that, it's just loud loud loud.

I have noticed a lot of movies and shows that don't really take advantage of multichannel systems. I was watching a show last night that had a scene with rain and the rain was only on the front channels and it was a bit of a letdown (the show was broadcasting in 5.1).

Erwin fucked around with this message at 20:53 on Jun 2, 2011

coolskillrex remix
Jan 1, 2007

gorsh

Erwin posted:

Here's an off-topic question: why is the sound in theaters so god-damned loud? I mean, I like loud, good sounding systems, but some theaters push it to the point of being painful, and I'm positive they're exceeding OSHA limits. Has any theater gotten in trouble for this?

I feel like there's a point at which a soundtrack doesn't sound as good because the system is overloading your ears. I think some theaters put in their system and then just crank it up to 100% without putting any thought into it.

I go to AMC theaters and have never experienced this, one time i went to a century near my house (right next to a high school so theaters are PACKED with dumb shits) to see "fast and furious" (4) with some free castrol movie tickets. Either the theater hosed it up, or F&F was mastered to have no dynamic range whatsoever... it was like i was listening to a lovely bootleg rap album, everything had the exact same dynamics, regardless of what was happening. It was the only time my ears have actually hurt after an action scene in a theater. If i had paid i would have walked up and just left.

DragonKeeper
Aug 4, 2004
MOLE GAVE ME THIS ACCOUNT OK GUYS

Erwin posted:


I at one point considered taking a decibel meter to the theater and writing a letter if it was over OSHA limits, but I don't want to be an old fuddy-duddy. Also, it sounds like it may be more the movie's fault (in terms of a poor mix) than the theater's fault if they're just leveled to a reference level.

You only have one set of ears, and who knows if your local theater(s) are set up properly or not. My advice? If it's too loud say something. I realize this does mean getting up during your feature presentation, but often times trailers are mixed louder than the feature, so they aren't usually a good indicator. I know we prefer to err on the side of caution, and if we have to run a decibel or two below reference, so be it. We also try to screen every single movie before it opens to the public so we can catch these things and adjust for them before anyone even has a chance to possibly complain.

Edit: The other thing you have to take into consideration is sound format, at least when you are dealing with 35mm. Most of our film houses have some type of digital audio, but not all of them. While films can contain an analog stereo track, a Dolby digital track, an SDDS track, and a DTS sound track, the only one they are technically required to have is the analog stereo. After analog stereo, the Dolby is the most common, followed by DTS and SDDS, in my experience anyways. Most modern theaters will tend to have a Dolby setup before anything else, but if the theater is older you will probably have a bit of a mix like us. The problem being that at the time everyone wanted to be the next big thing, but in the end someone has to come out on top(see vhs, blu-ray, etc). If you get a film print that has say, only an analog track and a Dolby track, and you put it in an auditorium with an SDDS setup, you are going to fall back to analog, and hence it will have terrible range, and will generally just sound muddled. You may even run into theaters where they run mostly analog and reserve the digital for only the biggest (read: newest) releases, and some might not have any digital decoders at all. Again this all depends on where you go, and the vintage of the building as well. If you go in during a slow day and find someone really knowledgeable, be it a projectionist (hard to find downstairs) or a manager, you could pry for some info about what you are actually hearing. Of course this will soon all be moot as Hollywood continues to move toward pure digital distribution. Before that happens, everyone will either need to convert from film to digital, or they will find themselves without any content to exhibit, save for the possible old or indie film.

DragonKeeper fucked around with this message at 21:48 on Jun 2, 2011

Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

I want to make sure I'll have all the connections I need coming. I don't understand how the subwoofer hooks up to the receiver though. The back of the sub looks like this. The back of the receiver looks like this. It looks like I need some sort of Y splitter to go from the sub plugin on the back of the receiver to the red/white plugins on the back of the sub? What with all the other connections on the sub?

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Hob_Gadling
Jul 6, 2007

by Jeffrey of YOSPOS


Grimey Drawer

Just connect the Sub pre out to your subwoofers left input and you'll be fine. The other connections are for speakers, but since you have a full-fledged receiver you don't need to (and in fact shouldn't) use them.

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