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ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

I usually offer a $5-$10 mat fee right up front, have yet to have anyone accept it.

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ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

CommonShore posted:

Discussion topic for all of you theory crafters here.

You mentioned it a bit, but I like to work a lot of submissions from top halfguard. Kimura/Americana on the far arm. D'arce if they underhook the far side, sort of wizzer to straight armbar if they underhook the near side. Papercutter choke, head and arm choke. I like working submissions from here because this is the position the referee will give you time in. Full guard you're pretty much standing up immediately. Full pin? As you said, why give up something you have for something you might lose anyway. Plus if your top half submissions are halfway decent it makes freeing the trapped leg trivial as your opponent focuses entirely on defending the sub.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

I had hoped they would make leg contact a delayed shido so if you grabbed a leg but completed the throw you'd get the penalty plus whatever score for the throw. This would allow the use of leg grabs but at increased risk if you don't make the throw.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

The no outright win via wazari is interesting. There's going to be some utterly exhausting matches.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

My gym is pretty frugal with promotions. Unless Royce shows up for a seminar, then everybody gets a new belt :/

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

mariooncrack posted:

Does anyone have any recommendations for gi pants? My gi top is fine but the pants are too big.

https://www.justgipants.com

They're a little slim fitting but the quality is great. The classic fabric is straight cotton, like judo pants, the modern fabric is ripstop like most bjj pants.

I'm 5'11" and 180lbs and although the A2 classics fit I'll probably go with an A3 in the future.

ihop fucked around with this message at Apr 18, 2017 around 14:05

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Opal posted:

Would you really beat a runner doing BJJ in terms of like calorie burn or max sustained HR/average HR?

I do bjj and I run and the answer is an unequivocal no. You might hit a higher max HR doing bjj but it won't be sustained. Keep in mind too that the better you get at grappling the easier it is to conserve energy, whereas getting better at running just means you go faster and further.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Got to roll with a visiting black belt at my bjj club the last two evenings. He was about my age and introduced himself as Tim when I rolled with him. As the clubs resident judo guy he was eager to start standing with me. No surprise given how quickly and cleanly he'd take me down, either with double-legs or just clinch up and greco-roman me to the ground. On the ground he repeatedly destroyed me from top half-guard. He gave me a couple nice tips and they were pleasant rolls. For some reason it didn't occur to me to ask why everyone kept taking pictures with him till he'd left. Turns out it was Tim Kennedy , and he's a nice guy.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

I frequently run into a guy from the Team ROC gym, I'll ask him his opinion of the school if I see him this weekend. He's a nice and talented guy, for whatever that's worth. I've also practiced with members of the judo club and they're great.

If you ever end up in Chapel Hill send me a pm, I work out with the Gracie school there and the UNC judo club.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Had THE best judo practice tonight. I'm in at a university club so during the summer our practices are usually pared down to a few older blackbelts and one or two lower ranks. 2 hour practice is mostly or entirely randori, 60/40 or 50/50 split tachiwaza/newaza, not much instruction.

Tonight was three blackbelts from our club (and I'm the youngest in my mid-thirties.) There were also two young shodans from out of town who are apparently here for the summer. One of them was a great guy. Even at only 5'11" and 175 I'm also the biggest BB at my club. This guy was a few inches taller than me and probably 230 so it was nice to play someone taller and reasonably heavier than me. I was surprised both by how much easier it is to get under someone when you're starting there, and also how much harder it is to lift someone who actually weighs more than you. He also seemed to have a great attitude so I think everyone took it a little easier on him.

His buddy though... He was about my size, looked a little out of shape, and was wearing a gi with the "I participated" patch from some international tournament a couple years ago. I've started to notice a trend among softened judoka who drop in at a new club wearing a tournament gi. Anyway this guy was the most abrasive person I've ever met. Utterly contrarian, anything said or any opinion offered, whether directed at him or not, was instantly argued with, no matter how trivial. The brief time we spent working specific throwing technique he was an endless stream of unsolicited advice. And namedropping like a motherfucker. I don't think he's actually practiced with any of the high level players he analyzed, I got more the impression of someone who watches a lot of youtube videos.

This was pretty much confirmed when we started sparring. Dude got absolutely DESTROYED. I had the first round of newaza with him and it took all of 20 seconds to catch him with an armbar. I thought maybe he was from a club that doesn't spend much time on the ground but no. When we switched to tachiwaza He was hard to put flat on his back but easy to get off his feet. Highlight was looking over and seeing our 135lb 58 year old head coach stand him straight upside down before dumping him on his back with a beautiful yoko tomoe. Eventually he just started sitting rounds out, said he wasn't "feeling his judo" today. Normally I would have felt a bit like a bully but come on man, if you're gonna talk a mean game you better be able to back it up.

After practice I genuinely told him I hope he comes back. His personality was so absurd it circled around to humorous. And it was nice to have a younger player with rank. Maybe its wrong but I'm more willing to go hard and less concerned about injuring a 22 year old than a 58 year old.

What a fun sport.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

You're also a genius fyi.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

With the right partners you can also flow grapple without being very strenuous. Pretty gentle on recovery days. I also feel like the whole body exercise helps (me) recover from the DOMS better than just resting.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Huh for some reason I thought my club was the only one that did that stupid poo poo. Congratulations on the promotion though. Welcome to the "give sage advice to white belts" club

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

ICHIBAHN posted:

Can someone recommend me some good sports psychology books or docs? Had a bjj tournament on Sunday, couldn't shake negative feelings about it, and didn't perform well.
Cheers

I haven't read it but I listened to the author discussing this book and took quite a bit from it. It's not sports specific, but explores the stress response in general and how all the physiological effects (high heart rate, increased respirations, racing thoughts) are actually your brain and body preparing for peak performance. Understanding this allows you to embrace the response rather than fight it.

Even without having read the book just knowing this has helped me deal with competition jitters better.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Yuns posted:

Omoplatas are relatively easy to enter and good for forcing the sweep but are challenging to finish. There are many escapes from omoplata including rolling and posturing. A lot of times you need to be able to force the shoulder to touch the mat and control the lower body position to ensure a finish.

that's where I've been lately. Finishing omoplatas is hard (for me) but ending up in the top hub sitting on their shoulder is pretty easy. Lots of transition options from there (even back to a more-secure omoplata) and definitely an improvement from bottom guard position.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Yeah for low level comps I think dropping weight is only useful for increased confidence. I know that when I start looking cut I feel pretty badass, but only up to the point that it starts to affect my energy and endurance. If I start feeling wiped then I'm definitely into diminished-returns territory.

I've stretched it to try and put myself in the same category as a specific opponent but without coordinating that always seems to backfire when they do the opposite and bulk up to the bracket I started in.

It's worth trying just to see what you're capable of and how you tolerate it, just don't go camp out in the sauna wrapped up in garbage bags.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Berimbolo question: Even though they're not legal in my rank, training partners keep grabbing the footlock on my non-DLR foot when I rotate under. I've caught a few of them by releasing the DLR leg and swinging around for the armbar, but it doesn't feel reliable enough for me. How do you more advanced players protect the foot that comes across the opponent's hips?

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

That's useful, thanks! I've actually been doing more or less what he demonstrated, clearing the knee and straightening the leg. One of the issues I've been having is a particular brown belt who grabs my foot when I invert, and even though I don't feel much pressure from the submission he'll immediately release the hold and reset positions as though I had tapped. I think he is just being overly cautious of injuring me, but I feel like I'm not even given a chance to play with the position before he bails.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

KildarX posted:

Submission only, if no decision five random audience members are selected to vote for who most entertained them join the match on behalf of their preferred fighter.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

CommonShore posted:

I've twice made people tap when they body triangled me and managed to tuck the foot. If the lock is on my right side, I roll to the right, put my left foot on their right foot to free it from behind my knee and pin it to the ground, and then get my right foot there too and hip up.

easy money aaayyyyyyyyyyy.

When I was a white belt in judo, too new to even know the rules, I was rolling with a blackbelt. He took my back and crossed his ankles in front of me. I had seen a Gracie YouTube that specifically taught the ankle lock in that situation. As he sinks in a choke I remembered the video and crossed my ankles over his and arched back.

He took it well, explained the rules to me and said he should have known better than to cross his feet.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Another situational question: when in bottom half with knee shield, I like sitting up and shooting the underhook to the far waist, like setting up the old school sweep, back take, or rolling under if they pressure hard into me. Tonight though one particular lanky guy was whizzering the arm in to threaten the d'arce every time I tried to close space. He wasn't getting the choke but it was frustrating my sweep attempts. I tried to keep my head low and tight to his ribs but he kept getting the hand far enough around my neck to force me to deal with it. Any advice?

Edit: I guess something like this seems like a good plan, I'm just reluctant to go to my back again.
https://youtu.be/hym3JsDIUQM

ihop fucked around with this message at Oct 14, 2017 around 03:06

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

02-6611-0142-1 posted:

After thinking about it for a bit, maybe you should use a high underhook until your body positioning is solid, and then switch to the low one?

I'll give this a try. In my head it feels like I'll have a difficult time both getting to the high underhook from knee shield and sinking down to the hips once I've got the high hook. I also am having pretty good success off scrambles with a body lock around the waist so I'm more inclined to go straight to the hips when possible.

I like the sweep you described above. I've used it before but like you said, that moment before you get the sweep when all their weight is over your chest is not very comfortable.

I also like the deep half idea. I don't play that position much but I should and this seems like a good excuse and entry.

Edit: judo black belts say they start in turtle to practice from the worst position but really they're just using the position to catch a rest.

ihop fucked around with this message at Oct 15, 2017 around 01:57

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

I generally encourage lifting weights as a supplement to grappling but I think beginners should try to be conscious of when they're falling back on strength instead of technique. Especially if you're already strong when you start BJJ, you're going to rely on strength ALL THE TIME. I'm a pretty experienced grappler and when I start hitting the weights I find myself trying to muscle through positions. I do it because it feels cool and often/usually works. Problem is there will ALWAYS be someone stronger, and relying on strength is setting yourself up to fail against that person. Technique is what beats that guy.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Yuns posted:

We have over 1200 students just at the main Manhattan academy not counting Brooklyn or any other satellite.and we've been around for more than 20 years so we have a ton of guys with 10+ years of BJJ.

Total Mcdojo

(Kidding, I have a black belt in envy)

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

God drat Gordon looks weaponized.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans


Would this be legal in an IBJJF competition or would it be considered a neck crank/can opener?

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Yeah I've been going after kimuras this year. I enjoy diving after them while in my opponent's DLR or z-guard or whatever. I still have a bitch of a time hitting them off closed guard though. Any suggestions?

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

JaySB posted:

Trap the arm instead for an inverted triangle

I do this too, if only to keep it "judo" legal. I also like pushing the wrist of the triangled arm across their torso for a kimura-like sub.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

I like that transition too, and will usually allow people to pass my half guard if I've got the grip just to hit that sweep. I definitely really have to focus on pushing the trapped wrist into their hips/lower abs or risk losing the position. There's also the slick armbar if they try to pull up and away.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Siivola posted:

Hey CommonShore, how'd they change judo rules this season? Looks like waza-ari went back to half an ippon, but any other changes?

Slight changes to the shidos, 3 instead of 4 I think. Also minor changes to the leg grab rule, I think first leg grab is a shido, 2nd is DQ? Changes to gripping rules. Pistol grip is ok. Cross grip and belt grips are back, but you still can't use them purely defensively. I think they shortened the osaekomi times by 5 seconds as well. Though I can't really remember if those are the new rules or the changes from last time.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Tap early tap often. Remember you're not there (at practice) to compete with anyone but yourself.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Nestharken posted:

If I'm reading it correctly, that rule about grabbing the legs from the bottom side of newaza straight-up bans a lot of BJJ staples like the tripod sweep, DLR guard, etc., which were used with some success in high-level judo this last year.

That was my first thought as well. Am I correct in the assumption that in the above situations, if the standing opponent puts a knee to the mat, they're considered "engaged" in newaza and leg contact becomes legal? What about a hand on the mat?

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

vaginal facsimile posted:

From my experience, cardio is more important than weightlifting. Weightlifting and strength are great but having sustained energy to use those muscles is key otherwise their useless.

edit: create space and breath. Close your elbows. Never stay flat and don't push.

I agree. Speaking personally when I'm strong I tend to use techniques and positions that allow me to overpower opponents. I do this because overpowering someone feels good to the caveman part of my brain. Works great too, as long as my partner isn't stronger than me or utilizing better technique.

When I'm not strong I have nothing but technique, and my grappling reflects it.

When I'm fit but not strong I feel like I can chain techniques continuously and indefinitely, rather than the usual brief scramble to stable position followed by 15-30 seconds of mutual breath-catching.

Plus breathing calmly while my partner wheezes like an asthmatic and makes that face like they just wish you'd take a break feels even better than overpowering them.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Got second in my division at the US Grappling event this weekend. Won two by submission but there's always some 4-stripe who shows up to ruin my day.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

mariooncrack posted:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKSCEeA1UnM

Had no idea what a sumi gaeshi was, looked it up, and found this video. I hope it helps someone else out. I definitely have some things I want to try when I go back to the gym.

Just a note of caution, if your opponent catches a terrible head-outside single and you attempt a terrible sumi counter it's very easy to spike them right onto the top of their head.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

GT seems like one of the most benevolent grapplers around. He never does anything I'd consider a "dick move" even if his opponents aren't so polite. Similar to Marcello. It's a little dissonant to see him straight up trying to hurt someone.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

Mechafunkzilla posted:

I mean there's the super basic one where you peel the reaping leg and then sit on the other side of it.

I've gotten a lot of reversals from the bottom against white/blue belts by grabbing a handful of lapel or sleeve and shoving a foot in their armpit. It's like catnip or something. No matter how bad they are at ankle locks they can't help but go for it.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

You've got an opponent who probably has no concept of when to concede to a throw, and that continued resistance will only make the eventual throw more devastating. That opponent also practices ukemi rarely and has possibly never been thrown full-speed by a skilled judo player. They've got no muscle memory for tucking their chin. Bells get wrung, feelings get hurt.

ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

I was rolling with "the leg-locking guy" at my gym tonight. We were trading top/bottom SLX starting positions. From either spot he was quickly forcing us to 50/50, then 80/20, then inside heel hook. I felt pretty clueless from all the positions. Once we hit 50/50 I felt inclined to try to rotate towards my free leg and wedge it behind his butt to try and pull my knee free but I was getting no where and then he'd point out that he'd scooped my heel and it was a good time to tap.

In other words I don't know what to do with my feet or legs. Or hands.

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ihop
Jul 23, 2001
King of the Mexicans

I've got up to 3 blue belt stripes, depending on how many survive the washing machine. I got to blue pretty quickly since I came in with a 5 year old judo black belt. I still practice each 1-3 days a week, though my bjj school has a deeper talent pool than my judo one.

I do wish my bjj school was a bit more competition-oriented. It's a Gracie affiliate and leans a little heavier than I'd prefer towards the self-defense aspect.

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