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wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


Any thoughts on the RB250GS? I've been looking for some cheap managed gigabit switches for my home network and these are priced almost the same as the unmanaged D-Links I usually buy. I'm pretty much looking for VLAN support, preferably also with SNMP stats available per-port, anything else on top of that is a bonus.

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wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


yarrmatey posted:

I'm about 30 minutes into evaluating a couple, and as a managed switch, I'm a little disappointed. Rather than the software being based on RouterOS, it is a tiny 38KB image. Management seems to be http and SNMPv1 read only (no https, ssh, or telnet).

The strangest thing of all is that they dispense with this quaint notion that IPv4 hosts need to have a netmask and a gateway to go with their IP address, and they basically implement the IP stack as reply-only, and instead of using an arp cache and routes, the switches just respond to the IP and MAC address of the original request. Probably not the device of choice if you have old fashioned notions about being RFC compliant, etc.

So, I got all worked up and disappointed about the issues in this device, and then I remembered, it's + . If you are thinking about this vs a catalyst ... run away. If you are thinking about this vs an unmanaged D-Link, go nuts.

Yikes. I don't have an application where that would matter, as my home network is not exactly complicated or large, but on principle it's hard for me to consider something that takes such a lazy shortcut in a key part of it's functionality. It makes me wonder what else isn't implemented ideally.

Can you comment on the VLAN performance or if it supports LACP?

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


SamDabbers posted:

Then again, the posters don't seem to be quite as terrible as those in the Mikrotik forums, which is just painful to read.

Haha, try the UniFi section. Since ubiquitous WiFi is in high demand and they're the entry level of "real" solutions the retards are out in force. Most recently someone went full offensive against me for daring to suggest that MAC filtering on WiFi was not a security measure.

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


zennik posted:

Not always. I live in a heavily saturated area and have good luck with the 5ghz spectrum. It doesn't punch through walls and crap nearly as well, which means it's easier to deal with in apartments and neighborhoods.

Not only does it have shorter range, but there are a lot more useful channels. 2.4GHz has three non-overlapping channels, four if you're somewhere that can use channel 14. 5GHz has many more and doesn't make the mistake of allowing users to select "middle" channels which would overlap with two of the ideal non-overlapping channels.

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


jeeves posted:

Should I be concerned about a 1000 mW antenna off of one of these wifi routers being so close to both?

No more concerned than you should be about your cell phone in your pocket or your laptop on your lap. That is to say not at all. One watt is basically nothing, plus it's non-ionizing radiation so it can't damage atomic structures anyways. You have to get to the high end of light on the electromagnetic spectrum (ultraviolet and up) before electromagnetic radiation of any kind becomes inherently dangerous.

The only physical effect you'll receive from WiFi or any other radio signal is heating. At high powers this can be significant, your microwave oven uses the same frequency range as 802.11b/g and the low band of n. It also has hundreds to over a thousand watts of power directed in to a small chamber designed to reflect it around for maximum efficiency.

Compare this to one single watt being emitted in all directions with no containment. If you're using a normal omnidirectional antenna the amount of the signal that hits you at all drops off massively the further you get away from it. From even two feet you're only in the path of a tiny fraction of the emitted radiation, and clearly you don't absorb anywhere close to all of it since your laptop and cell phone still work just fine when you or anyone else are in between them and the access point. Needless to say, the heating effect is practically immeasurable. Humans on average emit 60 watts of heat when resting apparently, so if you share your bed with another human they'd be heating you significantly more than the WiFi.


tl;dr: Don't worry about radio waves unless they're from a high-power directional source aimed at you.

wolrah fucked around with this message at 21:28 on Oct 9, 2014

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