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Emily Spinach
Oct 20, 2010

:)



KasioDiscoRock posted:

In Ontario when they were still doing first doses by highest risk groups first, pregnancy was classified as the same priority level as (I believe) 70+ and healthcare workers who werenít directly dealing with Covid. So not the highest priority group, but pretty far up there.

FWIW I got both doses during my pregnancy, and Iím now involved in a North American study on pregnancy/Covid vaccines, which if anyone else is interested in participating in, I can send you contact info.

Oh, I'd be interested.

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boquiabierta
May 27, 2010

"I will throw my best friend an abortion party if she wants one"


Yes. She should get the shot.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





boquiabierta posted:

Yes. She should get the shot.

KasioDiscoRock
Nov 17, 2000

Are you alive?

Emily Spinach posted:

Oh, I'd be interested.


https://mothertobaby.org/pregnancy-studies/pregnant-women/

Iím already partway through the study, it takes a bit of time for the phone calls but the only ďhardĒ part of it was trying to remember all the dates that I took a medication/had an ultrasound/etc.

Koivunen
Oct 7, 2011

there's definitely no logic
to human behaviour

Since she has already had the first dose, YES she needs to get the second. Itís not something she can redo in the future (as far as we know), and the timing of the second dose is crucial to offer adequate protection.

the_chavi
Mar 2, 2005



Toilet Rascal

KasioDiscoRock posted:

FWIW I got both doses during my pregnancy, and Iím now involved in a North American study on pregnancy/Covid vaccines, which if anyone else is interested in participating in, I can send you contact info.

Yes, I'd love to!

KasioDiscoRock
Nov 17, 2000

Are you alive?

the_chavi posted:

Yes, I'd love to!

Posted a link above!

the_chavi
Mar 2, 2005



Toilet Rascal

KasioDiscoRock posted:

Posted a link above!

Reading is hard. Sorry about that. Signing up now!!

Emily Spinach
Oct 20, 2010

:)



When I filled out the online form I indicated I heard about the study on social media. I wasn't expecting them to ask me what social media site, but I guess now they'll have a note of at least one referral from something awful because my brain froze and I didn't think to lie.

It's kind of funny when she was going through the screening questions she said some of them might be embarrassing but that was the only embarrassing one.

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010

:science:


Soiled Meat

My wife has said a couple of times that she wants a body pillow to help her sleep during pregnancy (currently about 10 weeks), and with our anniversary coming up I figure now's as good a time as any to get her one. Any recommendations, especially ones that will still be useful post-pregnancy?

BadSamaritan
May 2, 2008

crumb by crumb in this big black forest



There is a nonzero chance a pregnancy body pillow may end up super sweaty or with like a lil-to-moderate amount of pee on it so maybe donít view it as necessarily a long term gift. That said, I liked the amazon Queen Rose brand one even if I felt a bit bad about taking up so much bed.

Tamarillo
Aug 6, 2009


I didn't have much success with body pillows, the big one I got was too firm and I couldn't position it properly - I ended up with a little wedge I could put under my bump and a mattress topper that I could sink into to take the strain off my hip joints. I'm 20 weeks now with #2 and have been using the topper since about 18 weeks.

Koivunen
Oct 7, 2011

there's definitely no logic
to human behaviour

I got the AngQi u-shaped one and Iíve slept with it every night for the last nearly three years, even when I wasnít pregnant. Itís soft but offers enough support, and you can move the fluff around if you want more support in certain areas. My only complaint is that the case is kind of a pain to put back on after you wash it, but itís a really great pillow. Currently posting from my bed with the top part of the pillow propped up for my back and using the long parts for arm rests. This is also how I nurse my baby in bed.

If you want to get her something really nice, get a quality memory foam mattress topper and a waterproof mattress protector. It saved my hips during both pregnancies, and is super comfortable when not pregnant.

ghost story
Sep 10, 2005
Boo.

A waterproof mattress protector is a must. It will be useful now and later on for spills and ... other stuff - even in toddler/big kid age.

Also a good tip - if you have summer/winter sheets - have sets of 2 of each. Maybe a spare of each. My kids are older now and my bed is The Hangout Spot in the mornings/afternoons even though they have their own perfectly good beds and plenty of other places in the house, including a playroom. Nothing like going to bed and finding a sticky spot from a kid's afternoon snack.

A u shaped body pillow will also help with sleep down the road. I don't remember the brand I used since its been years but I just picked one up at either Babys R Us or a maternity clothing store. The U shape was key. The body pillow and yoga was how I got any good quality sleep from mid to end pregnancy with the second.

Emily Spinach
Oct 20, 2010

:)



Koivunen posted:

I got the AngQi u-shaped one and I’ve slept with it every night for the last nearly three years, even when I wasn’t pregnant. It’s soft but offers enough support, and you can move the fluff around if you want more support in certain areas. My only complaint is that the case is kind of a pain to put back on after you wash it, but it’s a really great pillow. Currently posting from my bed with the top part of the pillow propped up for my back and using the long parts for arm rests. This is also how I nurse my baby in bed.

I've got the same one and love it. One thing is double check when you order what the pillowcase material is--they have velvet and jersey kinds. When I ordered the pillow I got one with velvet without realizing and it was way too hot. Made me not want to use the pillow until it occurred to me to look on Amazon to see if they sold other types of pillowcases. Picked up a jersey one and it's been great. I think my husband thinks it's going away when the baby is here in October but lol no.

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010

:science:


Soiled Meat

She's mentioned a U-shaped pillow specifically so I'll pick one of those up as well as a waterproof mattress protector if the whole thing isn't too pricey. Thanks!

the_chavi
Mar 2, 2005



Toilet Rascal

I got a C shaped one for my first pregnancy and loved it - highly recommend that + a wedge pillow. The long rectangular body pillow that Wirecutter recommends is too heavy and too hot, don't waste your money. Finally, after some severe joint/groin/hip pain in the third trimester, I dropped $300 on a massage pillow that allows pregnant and lactating women to lay on their stomachs - it has been amazing for my hips. I don't sleep on it all night long, but it's good for naps and for part of the night at least by taking weight off my hips, as would happen when I'm sleeping on my side.

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010

:science:


Soiled Meat

OK they offer this in a few different sizes, 55 to 70 inches. Is it just different sizes of the "ends" of the pillow or does the sleep cavity get larger as well? Trying to pick the right size for my 5'4" wife, I'm guessing the 55" is fine.

Emily Spinach
Oct 20, 2010

:)



Not sure about the sleep cavity, although it's probably just the ends of the pillow getting longer. FWIW I'm 5'4" and have the 55", but I kind of wish I had a longer one so it could go between my knees and my feet at the same time.

Koivunen
Oct 7, 2011

there's definitely no logic
to human behaviour

Iíd for sure get the longer one, itís nice to have your top leg at the same level instead of it touching your bottom leg at the ankles and making that weird angle.

Tamarillo
Aug 6, 2009


I just want to say that respiratory illness while pregnant is some next level bullshit. I'm just closing out week 2 of coughing and congestion, and have a dry cough that has had me seconds from vomiting about 7 times today, and the best my husband was able to walk away from the pharmacy with was paracetamol and some nasal spray. I hate hate hate the no immune system combined with inability to take 90% of drugs.

the_chavi
Mar 2, 2005



Toilet Rascal

Tamarillo posted:

I just want to say that respiratory illness while pregnant is some next level bullshit. I'm just closing out week 2 of coughing and congestion, and have a dry cough that has had me seconds from vomiting about 7 times today, and the best my husband was able to walk away from the pharmacy with was paracetamol and some nasal spray. I hate hate hate the no immune system combined with inability to take 90% of drugs.

I'm so sorry. Yes - the restrictions on medication are maddening. I just moved to a new city that has seriously set off my allergies, and the pharmacist is like lol good luck, come back in a month when you've given birth and I can give you some actual medication. Hope you feel better soon!

Emily Spinach
Oct 20, 2010

:)



the_chavi posted:

I'm so sorry. Yes - the restrictions on medication are maddening. I just moved to a new city that has seriously set off my allergies, and the pharmacist is like lol good luck, come back in a month when you've given birth and I can give you some actual medication. Hope you feel better soon!

Allegra, zyrtec, claritin and benadryl should be ok according to the little fact sheet my midwife gave me. Not sure if those actually help you any though, or if they're available where you are.

Manwithastick
Jul 26, 2010



My wife is suffering with bloating and nausea - any tips for her helpful hubby?

Koivunen
Oct 7, 2011

there's definitely no logic
to human behaviour

Manwithastick posted:

My wife is suffering with bloating and nausea - any tips for her helpful hubby?

Keep smells to a minimum, no cooking or candles or soaps or obviously stinky stuff unless she gives the okay. Tell her she looks beautiful in sweatpants. Stock up on plain crackers, sour hard candy, and peppermint altoids.

CloFan
Nov 5, 2004



The past 36 hours have been rough. Baby suffered hypoxia (meconium aspiration) during labor and had to be manually ventilated for a while. We live an hour away from a Children's Hospital, so they sent an ambulance over equipped with a Therapeutic Hypothermia machine to put her on ice. It's a neat treatment: https://www.childrenscolorado.org/doctors-and-departments/departments/neonatal-intensive-care-unit/neonatology-programs/whole-body-cooling/

Anyways, we are just waiting the 3-5 days it takes to do this and get MRI results because it's all we can do. Mom is doing great, should be released tomorrow morning. There's lots of signs that baby is doing good too, just hard to sit and wait.

Emily Spinach
Oct 20, 2010

:)



I hope the treatment works well for her! It's good that they were able to do it during transport too. That is pretty neat and made me look to see if the NICU at our hospital (well, the associated children's hospital) has that. Turns out they do something similar but with just the head, using a fancy hat, instead of the whole body.

boquiabierta
May 27, 2010

"I will throw my best friend an abortion party if she wants one"


CloFan posted:

The past 36 hours have been rough. Baby suffered hypoxia (meconium aspiration) during labor and had to be manually ventilated for a while. We live an hour away from a Children's Hospital, so they sent an ambulance over equipped with a Therapeutic Hypothermia machine to put her on ice. It's a neat treatment: https://www.childrenscolorado.org/doctors-and-departments/departments/neonatal-intensive-care-unit/neonatology-programs/whole-body-cooling/

Anyways, we are just waiting the 3-5 days it takes to do this and get MRI results because it's all we can do. Mom is doing great, should be released tomorrow morning. There's lots of signs that baby is doing good too, just hard to sit and wait.

How is baby doing?

CloFan
Nov 5, 2004



Thanks for asking! I was going to update tonight, as we discussed MRI results with doc today.

I thought the cooling period would take forever, but it seems to have flown by. She had a seizure about 20 hours after she was born; docs administered medicine, and she hasn't had another since. She got off the vent and catheter halfway through cooling, so we got to hear her cry way earlier than expected which was a huge relief. Wifey and I walked in when they were checking vitals and she cried out, we both stopped and immediately started bawling! Now she's fully 'defrosted', vitals are great, she's responsive and on track. We've been able to hold her for the past couple days when she got the EEG wires off, that's been very nice. Still feeding by a tube, going to try bottle tomorrow.

Overall prognosis is good. There were a couple very minor 'white spots' on her scan, but also one that was a bit bigger on the right half that the neurologist was concerned about. Studies about this birth injury (HIE) are all over the place, with outcomes from No Lasting Injury to Cerebral Palsy and reduced mental capacity. It's super hard to predict any outcomes from an MRI, only time will tell. With that caveat, the doc said her she felt like the damage was fairly minimal and that she was optimistic of a good recovery! Still hard news, but I've got a lot of faith in this hospital we're at. They've been absolutely fantastic.

We hope to start 'In Rooming' with her soon, where we have a semi-private room and take care of her 24/7 with nurse check-ins. Currently we're in a Pod thingy where 3-5 nurses take care of 4-8 babies. If she takes to the bottle and continues to do well, we could be out and home before next week.

Wifey is doing OK. Still pretty drat sore, but holding up. She feels some guilt and I'm trying my best to be supportive there. She's very unhappy with her doctor and the hospital where we delivered. I won't go into do details there, but it was somewhat of a shitshow from start to finish.

Koivunen
Oct 7, 2011

there's definitely no logic
to human behaviour

CloFan posted:

Thanks for asking! I was going to update tonight, as we discussed MRI results with doc today.

I thought the cooling period would take forever, but it seems to have flown by. She had a seizure about 20 hours after she was born; docs administered medicine, and she hasn't had another since. She got off the vent and catheter halfway through cooling, so we got to hear her cry way earlier than expected which was a huge relief. Wifey and I walked in when they were checking vitals and she cried out, we both stopped and immediately started bawling! Now she's fully 'defrosted', vitals are great, she's responsive and on track. We've been able to hold her for the past couple days when she got the EEG wires off, that's been very nice. Still feeding by a tube, going to try bottle tomorrow.

Overall prognosis is good. There were a couple very minor 'white spots' on her scan, but also one that was a bit bigger on the right half that the neurologist was concerned about. Studies about this birth injury (HIE) are all over the place, with outcomes from No Lasting Injury to Cerebral Palsy and reduced mental capacity. It's super hard to predict any outcomes from an MRI, only time will tell. With that caveat, the doc said her she felt like the damage was fairly minimal and that she was optimistic of a good recovery! Still hard news, but I've got a lot of faith in this hospital we're at. They've been absolutely fantastic.

We hope to start 'In Rooming' with her soon, where we have a semi-private room and take care of her 24/7 with nurse check-ins. Currently we're in a Pod thingy where 3-5 nurses take care of 4-8 babies. If she takes to the bottle and continues to do well, we could be out and home before next week.

Wifey is doing OK. Still pretty drat sore, but holding up. She feels some guilt and I'm trying my best to be supportive there. She's very unhappy with her doctor and the hospital where we delivered. I won't go into do details there, but it was somewhat of a shitshow from start to finish.

Thatís great news! Neuro stuff is so tricky because is so hard to predict an outcome, especially in tiny kids whose brains are forming new connections all the time, but it sounds like sheís doing well!

If your wife is struggling with the situation, therapy is a great tool to work through it. I was a little traumatized by my first birth experience, but therapy helped out a lot. The sooner she reaches out the better, if she feels itís something that could benefit her. Some hospitals can recommend therapists who specialize in pregnancy and postpartum.

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010

:science:


Soiled Meat

Good news: passed the first trimester this week :toot:

Bad news: my wife's OBGYN is in-network for our insurance, but the ultrasound that we had at 10 weeks apparently wasn't despite being in the same hospital system as her OBGYN, and they're only three blocks away from each other to boot. Love American health care!

El Mero Mero
Oct 13, 2001



Does this thread double as the IVF/fertility questions thread? We're at about the 8 month mark and feeling pretty demoralized/starting to get ready to do research into fertility treatments and diagnoses.

Are there any resources/books that folks would recommend? Or things we should know upfront before we go down this route?

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





I am not a doctor!

In my circles, if you're over 32, people start reaching out for expert medical help at the 6 month mark. Go see a doc and get a blood panel done they will check out your FSH, TSH and LH hormone levels for the woman. If everything checks out there they may order a male fertility test. If that checks out, they'll do an intra* ultrasound of the uterus and look for excessive fibroids (some fibroids are to be expected) or other cool/weird stuff (my cousin had a heart shaped uterus which caused some interesting complications). If that checks out, they'll probably do a fallopian tube dye test (which is super cool google image search for angiogram). The image is live and at like 120fps, it's really impressive. Women who get a fallopian tube dye test have something like a 25% increased chance of concieving in the next period because the pressure from the dye, uh, stretches out the fallopian tubes. If they're coordinated, they'll run this test a couple days before your ovulaiton. If that test doesn't check out they might schedule surgery to unblock a tube or two.

In our case, wife needed about 25mg (itty bitty pill with literally zero side effects, perfect medication except you absolutely can't eat for 30 min after taking it) of TSH pill to bring her thyroid levels up, which fixed her hormone levels (it's super common for women to have low TSH after ~32, and doesn't take much for it to gently caress with fertility, like 7-10% below normal) and then we blew out her fallopian tubes the the dye test and bingo bango I have a tiny 10 month old human who likes to steal my glasses off my face and blow raspberries

In other cases, they have hormone injections ($80) that stimulate egg development/ovulation, and then there's IVF which is the whole shebang, "test tube baby" where they extract eggs and combine them with sperm in the lab and then track their growth and you even get to pick the sex of the baby (if you want) plus they can do stuff like screen for genetic stuff (major inherited stuff like huntington's disease, etc)

OF NOTE: There's actually a national register of fertility clinics, there are both public and private clinics, and they all publish their success rates and total number of clients. We initially went to a private one near our house (because convenience, and a consult is only like $350) and got a consult, and then found out about the online registry and found out that a) the private clinic was not above average, but charged 6x what the local hospital charged and b) the local public teaching hospital was in the top 10 in the nation and charged at cost, I think all-in we paid under $1500 for all doctors visits and tests etc. Fertility treatment varies wildly. A private clinic in NYC might cost you $25,000-40,000, a public clinic in the suburbs of a major metro area might charge you $11,000-$18,000 all-in for IVF. If your wife is taking time off from work, Denmark and/or The Netherlands will do a full IVF round for $2,400. Pakistan is an up and coming tourist-IVF center and has all the bells and whistles for about $5,000.

But yeah definitely go get a consult, they'll do an initial ultrasound and can check uterus thickness, initial screen for fibroids and walk you through next steps.

extra side note: blood tests take like, 2, 3 days tops to come back, if your doc doesn't call you with the results after a week, call them. Ours sat on our results for 6+ weeks which was very frustrating, i think they changed physical offices, still not a good excuse, and then immediately prescribed the TSH pills and that fixed most of the problem pretty much immediately

Good luck, modern medicine is really amazing and they really do have it down to a science. They can't solve for everything, but the ability to gently caress with your hormone levels to stimulate egg production/ripening helps a lot of people

BadSamaritan
May 2, 2008

crumb by crumb in this big black forest



El Mero Mero posted:

Does this thread double as the IVF/fertility questions thread? We're at about the 8 month mark and feeling pretty demoralized/starting to get ready to do research into fertility treatments and diagnoses.

Are there any resources/books that folks would recommend? Or things we should know upfront before we go down this route?

I recommend that if you can, talk to a reproductive endocrinologist or obgyn that specializes in fertility sooner rather than later. My issue was missed by my (then) ob the first time around and it wouldíve saved me some time and heartache if I had been more aggressive in getting diagnosis/treatment.

Best of luck- infertility issues can feel very demoralizing and isolating, and I hated feeling like I was living my life in two week chunks. If the clinic you go with has a social worker/therapist, Iíd recommend having a talk with them if you get in too much of a funk.

eta: had a funky uterus shape, got a lil surgery on it and now I have two cool kids. Modern medicine is pretty great.

BadSamaritan fucked around with this message at 09:10 on Sep 5, 2021

femcastra
Apr 25, 2008

If you want him,
come and knit him!


We tried for 6 months before getting help, got blood and semen tested, and then had the fallopian dye test. Fell pregnant that cycle, so it obviously did something. From starting to try to falling pregnant was around 1 year.

Second time around we thought it would take forever to fall pregnant but nope, instantly pregnant as soon as we started trying. Got my mirena out, period started that night, and was pregnant on my next ovulation.

I was 32 with baby number 1 and 34 with number 2.

Good luck!!!

Emily Spinach
Oct 20, 2010

:)



There is a getting knocked up thread here: https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3915703&pagenumber=1&perpage=40

It's not as active though, and as you've probably figured out folks in this thread are also happy to discuss. I just know for me when we were trying I wasn't always in the mood to read this thread.

I agree with folks saying to speak to an endocrinologist sooner rather than later, but especially if you're in the US, check your insurance. Since I'm under 35 I couldn't even get the ball rolling until we'd been trying unsuccessfully for a year. I hit the year mark last July, but because I was switching OBs/hospital systems and there were covid delays I couldn't get in to the new OB for a referral until September and didn't see the RE until October. The other thing is a lot of the tests depend on your cycle, so even if you get in right away there will be a few months before treatment can start. We were due to start IUI in late January of this year (I already had the clomid ready to go and everything), but actually ended up getting pregnant on our own right before that cycle.

Now I'm due in less than four weeks, which is madness. Two different people in the private baby bumps subreddit for October 2021 due dates woke up to their water breaking last night, one with my due date and one due a couple of days after. We've had a few early "graduations" but these are the first two where there's a good chance the baby won't spend much time, if any, in the NICU.

CloFan
Nov 5, 2004



Baby girl is doing good. We've been staying in this tiny NICU room for almost a week now, it's hell on our bodies and schedules but I'm glad we've got nurses here all the time for any help we may need.

The only thing stopping us going home is bottle training... It's very common for babies on feeding tubes to be very slow learners to take to regular feeding, but the pediatrician is impressed with her progress and expects we'll be going home in a few days. She's doing about 50% of her feed via bottle, doc wants to see closer to 80% before they'll take the tube out and discharge us.

El Mero Mero
Oct 13, 2001





This is great.

Is this the national registry?


Emily Spinach posted:

There is a getting knocked up thread here: https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3915703&pagenumber=1&perpage=40


I agree with folks saying to speak to an endocrinologist sooner rather than later, but especially if you're in the US, check your insurance. Since I'm under 35 I couldn't even get the ball rolling until we'd been trying unsuccessfully for a year.


Yeah we're on Kaiser and both under 35 so that's their line and we're thinking of just going to a private clinic for some of the initial screening items if the costs aren't eye watering. Kaiser doesn't gatekeep at all for men and we were able to get a test for male factor. One of the measures in the SA isn't great, which is are why we're thinking of speeding everything up.

Captain Magic
Apr 3, 2005

Yes, we have feathers--but the muscles of men.

Idk if this is just common knowledge but, after being demoralized after six months of trying, my wife and I both saw specialists to get the ball rolling. Mine recommended only having sex every other day while she was ovulating (so that the ejaculated sperm were the healthiest ones possible) and ipso presto, we made a baby and are nine/ten weeks in.

Again, idk if trying every other day is a thing everyone knows, but I sure didnít and it seemed to be the difference maker.

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Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





El Mero Mero posted:

This is great.

Is this the national registry?

Yeah we're on Kaiser and both under 35 so that's their line and we're thinking of just going to a private clinic for some of the initial screening items if the costs aren't eye watering. Kaiser doesn't gatekeep at all for men and we were able to get a test for male factor. One of the measures in the SA isn't great, which is are why we're thinking of speeding everything up.

Yeah that's the link

Another pro tip if you're getting denied by kaiser is tell them you've been trying for two years (or however long you've been together), a lot of doctors won't talk to you if you're under 35 unless you've been trying for over a year. There's not really any way for them to disprove your claims, but sounds like you may have already told the truth/disclosed so it may be in their system now

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