Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

I keep meaning to ask, but does anyone have a link to a good mei tai pattern that they can recommend? It seems simple enough, but without having one in front of me, I'll probably estimate the measurements incorrectly.

bamzilla posted:

A good resource for breastfeeding (probably the best online) would be http://www.kellymom.com.

Googling "essential baby items" brings up a host of items recommended and even some check lists with some good information. You can also get a list from your OBGYN or maybe your hospital's maternity ward. Here's one of the many links that came up: http://www.thenewparentsguide.com/essential-baby-products.htm Every person will have different ideas on what is necessary for starting your new life with baby.
I would also add Dr Jack Newman to that list. I know that kellymom is a bit broader, but there are some super helpful videos and such on his site.

I do think it would be worthwhile to have recommendations on specific products. I mean, everyone's different, obviously, but holy gently caress, is there a difference between, say, a My Brest Friend and a Boppy.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Phooney posted:



Question for Aagar! As a man who no doubt has much experience in getting feces off scrotums... what advice can you give? It was a long ordeal for me, and I think must have been pretty distressing for him.


Not Aagar, but someone who now has experience in removing meconium from baby balls - I found that using vaseline helped. Especially if I left it on (much like you would leave on some diaper rash cream), it kept it from sticking and made it much easier to just wipe off rather than making multiple passes.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Fun Times! posted:

I was talking to a friend today and the topic of home birthing came up. She claimed to be slightly opposed to hospital births (excepting complications) as home birthing is "more natural." Having not read much into the topic, my initial thoughts are that hospital births must be much safer for the child and mother. Can someone help educate me?
I feel that hospitals are more modern than home births, but I admit that I have almost no knowledge of how they happen. Is anesthesia used? What about after the birth, is the baby then taken to a hospital? Is home birth a question of safety at all or merely culture?

Really, it depends on where you are. If you're in the states, it varies widely from state to state, as there are different rules in different states. I disagree with homebirths in most places for safety reasons, however, you're going to get a variety of opinions. What area are you guys in?

ETA:

It looks like in FL they're licensed, and if you go to MANA's website, you can find the current status of laws in FL:
http://mana.org/laws/laws_fl.htm

However, just by looking at these laws, I don't think that the training is sufficient. Schooling is less than what is required for a nurse, and based on a quick scan, it looks like they only need to see 25 births for licensing. Compare that to an OB in a busy-ish hospital who's going to be seeing that many a week (if not more), for 4 years after completing their schooling before they can practice. So basically in FL, it's better than in a lot of states, but nowhere where it needs to be, imho (this is just based on a quick search, I have no idea on what the midwifery board is like there in terms of transparency and the like, in some states, they're pretty bad.) There are some red flags for homebirth midwives in the states in general, such as the fact that MANA refuses to release their safety figures, which should give anyone pause.

ChloroformSeduction fucked around with this message at 07:00 on Feb 28, 2011

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Today one of my cats peed in the downstairs crib. I'm wondering if it was just a convenient place to pee (?), or if it's a sign of Trouble Brewing?

In other new, my kid is officially a giant. Just over 14lbs, wearing 6 month clothes, and 8 weeks old today (he started off at 8lbs, 5 oz.) It's not fat either, he's just a really big kid, who's going to pay for my retirement with his pro hockey salary. He just never.stops.eating. Please tell me that this is going to slow down.

ETA: Partner just walked in the door, and one of his colleagues dropped in work today with his 4 month old daughter. She's 10 lbs.

anythingbutbloo posted:


I have a Boppy and I love it. I use it for everything except nursing. It's great to prop babies up with, especially when they're first starting to get head control and sit -- it catches them if they fall backwards.


Seconding this. Boppy is great, but if you're looking for something specifically for nursing, I found My Brest Friend to be much more helpful (especially at the beginning when you're getting your poo poo together.) Complete back-saver.

ChloroformSeduction fucked around with this message at 00:44 on Mar 24, 2011

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Janelle posted:

Question for those will baby boys who circumcised. When were they circumcised and who did it? I've been reading different websites and it says within the first 24-48 hours and give a list of who can do it. Just curious as to what the norm was. If local matters, I'm in the states.
Because my partner was Jewish, the circumcision was done on day 8 at our house (a bris/brit.) The guy who did it is a urologist and a mohel, so a medical dr and he has an anaesthetic protocol that he follows. It involves tylenol, a local numbing cream, a local injection and a sugar pacifier (because of the ceremony thing, the sugar pacifier was a sugar ball dipped in wine, which was a big hit.) If we had decided to do it without the ceremony, he does them at his office, and according to the info pdf, the ideal time is between 5-12 days. He's done something like 30,000 of them, so I was comfortable with his knowledge of the procedure seeing as his entire practice consists of circumcisions and vasectomies (and I guess he's developing a male iud.)

Ariza posted:

My old lady and I had a baby a couple of days ago and I have a question. I've been reading through google and can't get a straight answer. My wife is only going to be able to breastfeed for the week she has off (goes back next Wednesday the 30th) and then she's going to try and pump most of the time.

Nthing the WTF with the week off. I understand that it's for school, but... drat.

Exelsior posted:

I pump exclusively (four months now) and it is an enormous, time consuming bitch. The midwives at the hospital hardly ever saw EPers, so they weren't any help. The internet was my only resource.


Yeah, pumping really, really sucks, and it takes a lot of patience and dedication. I'm kind of meh about pumping, because I found it to be such a pain in the rear end, and not worth the time it took. I had intentions of exclusive breastfeeding and pumping, but right now it's about 50-75 breastmilk, with formula taking up the slack (I'm working a bit at the same time, and I can't always coordinate that around a feeding schedule.)

I know that I myself am not very good at pumping either, and I think that some people who EP can experience drops in supply. Which makes sense if you're like me, because I can't get nearly as much pumping as the baby can.

Longpig posted:

Hey guys I had a baby! Howell Davis H---- was born March 24 at 3:17 am. I was in labour for 25 hours including 1.5 hours of pushing before the doctor concluded that he was stuck and would have to be sectioned. So I got to have the joys of labour plus major surgery, hurray! In fact they only part of my birth plan that went right in the end was that I didn't get an episiotomy. After all that I didn't care though, because I still got my prize ham.

Congrats! Hope you're feeling ok after the labour/cs double whammy. Cute baby (and cute knitted things!)

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Ariza posted:

Our baby will fall asleep if someone is holding her, but as soon as I lay her down she wakes up and starts crying. I don't know if it's ok to let her cry herself to sleep or for how long I should let her cry before comforting her. I've tried reading up on it but everything has different ideas and I don't want to screw her up. As I type this, she's in my arms as she has been since about midnight. I've tried her swing and vibrating chair but she just starts crying as soon as I set her down.

As other people in the thread have mentioned, swaddling (followed by a quick nurse if fussy, as FITD said) helped a lot. The other big thing was having a bedtime routine and doing the cluster feed/tanking up before bed.

A few weeks ago, we had an instance where he was just screaming his head off and nothing would console him. My partner was out of town on business, and I was all by myself. I couldn't take it anymore, so I swaddled him and put him in his crib and walked away. In less than two minutes (timed on my phone, I'm not a CIO advocate, this was for my own sanity), he had fallen right asleep. He hadn't really napped well that day, and I realized that he was overtired. He just needed a lack of stimulation to settle down. Now when he gets like that, I just swaddle him, and sit with him in a dark nursery making shushing noises until he settles and then he goes to sleep quite quickly. White noise seems to help a lot. For him at least, the swings and and rocking him in my arms seems to be too much, and he responds better to just being snug.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Brennanite posted:

Where do you guys find nice, inexpensive maternity clothes? I don't want anything fancy, just semi-fashionable and not $$$. I think others have mentioned Target, but mine sucks. A row of plain tees and a rack of capris does not a maternity section make!

My favourite stuff for maternity were probably yoga pants. Not officially maternity, but they have lycra in them (or something stretchy, whatever), I could pull them below my belly and wear them postpartum while I lose the baby weight. I also liked nursing tanks. I had a problem finding maternity wear that was awesome and not a zillion dollars, because there are some truly great things if you're willing to fork out the cash . For work, I just modified some of my lab shirts by adding matching fabric panels. Sort of made them into A-line tops, but it got the job done.

ETA: In terms of dressing up, open cardigans, scarves and hoop earring/various accessories were what I used to make me not look like a total slob. I was lucky because it's a lot easier to layer in winter with that sort of stuff over neutral and plain maternity clothing.

ChloroformSeduction fucked around with this message at 15:03 on Apr 14, 2011

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

foxatee posted:

I didn't know this was a possibility.

This is basically what we're doing now: As of last night, my milk finally started coming in (exciting!). Before that, we were using the pump to at least get some stimulation and produce colostrum. I had very little progress, but knew not to expect much to come out. What did come out we fed to Peanut using a syringe (a suggestion given by one of the nurses). When that petered out, we switched to formula. But again, my milk has now come in, so we've stopped giving her formula and are feeding her exclusively breast milk. I'm not working right now, and don't plan on going back to school until June/July. I hope nothing changes too much when this happens.

Good googly moogly, my boobs hurt.

Ugh, yeah, boobs hurt a lot at first. It seems like supplementing with formula worked for you, which is good. The hospital I delivered at gets some of their funding from being able to say that a certain percentage of their mothers leave exclusively breastfeeding, so while I wasn't producing enough, the nurses kept telling me that it was totally normal for babies to be screaming nonstop and so dehydrated that their lips cracked open and bled. I discharged myself early, which forced them to get me a paediatrician who recommended adding some formula or donor milk. (A bit more to this story, but we're filing a formal complaint against the hospital, and my doctor has already written up my nurses.)/rant

Anyway, supplementing made life a 1000x easier, and took the stress off until we got our breastfeeding thing going. Like other people have said in this thread before, if you stick with it, generally it gets easier. Now we sometimes have problems feeding him from a bottle, though he will take it better from someone other than me if I'm not around.

In other news, we turned 3 months a few days ago. Off to parenting thread!

Only registered members can see post attachments!

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Ana Lucia Cortez posted:

Please tell me I'm not the only mother here who partied before realizing they were pregnant.

It's pretty common - I friend of mine went on an all-out bender one weekend before we knew she was pregnant, I had drinks, muscle relaxers and a horse land on me before I knew I was pregnant (um, not in that order or at the same time!) Check with your doctor about it, but it should be ok.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

bellybutton posted:


Does anyone have any experience with this really ridiculous condition? How did you cope? Did you find any tricks to make it hurt a little less?

I didn't have it, but my friend did (we were pregnant at the same time, and she got stuck with the crappy girdle thing.) It sucked a lot for her, but went away by the time she got home from the hospital for the most part, and she felt completely back to normal in that regard within about a week. The worst I got was some sort of weird hip disconnect that I really only noticed when riding, which thankfully went away after I had the baby.

Missa posted:

I don't know the difference between sunscreen and sunblock, honestly. But, our pediatrician said baby safe spf 50 is safe for all ages, even newborn, just keep it out of the eyes, and wash them after you come in.
Yeah, I pretty much got the same thing from the pharmacist. He said to do a small area first, and to watch in case there was some reaction, but that it's generally ok. We're outside every day, and went to Mexico last month, so I was fairly concerned about sun exposure. We used hats and long sleeves, but some sunscreen as well with no ill effects.

Tesla Insanely Coil posted:

Now I have a question for the thread:
This is my first pregnancy and I am 6 weeks pregnant and have extreme exhaustion plus some insomnia (plus nausea, some cramps, etc). The only remedy for exhaustion I've seen is herbal teas - is there anything else? I'm thinking I'll have to do one cup of green tea so that I can get to school on time.

The exhaustion sucks. That was by far and away the worst symptom I had, followed by insomnia. It was not bad at all during the second trimester, but awful for the first and third. I just had to deal with it, nothing really helped. You might want to look up the green tea thing though, I seem to recall it being a no-no in the first trimester because it somehow inhibits absorption of folic acid. I might be remembering this incorrectly (and it's probably only if you drink, like, 5 cups at a time.)

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Bodnoirbabe posted:


As much as it breaks my heart to do so, I honestly feel it's the best decision for us. Max and I need to start enjoying each other and we can't do that if all I'm doing is crying and going crazy.

From my experience, I found my relationship with my son got a lot better once I stopped stressing about the breastfeeding (we were doing the domperidone, pumping, etc.) He was happier, I was happier. The stress up to that point was unbelievable. As mentioned before, FFF is a great resource.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

There were some questions earlier about antihistamines and stuff during pregnancy - a really good site is motherisk.org, and they also have hotlines that you can call to speak to someone. You can generally pop a drug/supplement/medical condition into the search and get whatever the latest and greatest on it is.

Poison Cake posted:

Do you live in a region where pregnant women tend to be in marginal circumstances? I definitely got the impression at my OB/GYN office that a lot of their energy goes into (usually) young women who might be doing drugs or have limited finances. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but I do think that when one of their patients seemed "okay" for lack of a better word, they tended to be fairly casual.

This could be it too. My friend was going to a practice which also dealt with a lot of disadvantaged mothers, so they were kind of laid back with her being as she was over 16, not addicted to anything or having any communicable diseases. They might just assume you can kind of figure it out on your own if you seem relatively educated and on the ball.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

rangergirl posted:

We are in the starting to think about buying stuff phase, I'm 25 weeks and we want to at least get the big items taken care of by 8 months in case the kid comes early. I am going to have a small shower but I expect I'll mostly get clothes/toys stuff...I certainly don't expect anyone else to buy us the expensive gear.

A lot of it depends on your lifestyle, I think. For example, we live in a really walkable area, so one of our biggest purchases was the stroller (my SIL though, lives in the suburbs and drives most places, so went with a very inexpensive one.) We ended up going with an Orbit, since all the pieces were interchangeable, and when we added up the cost of buying everything separately (bassinet, bouncy chair, stroller, infant seat, bar so that infant seat fits in stroller, etc), it worked out to about the same. I also fly with him a fair amount, so a carseat that doubles as a stroller makes airport stuff a zillion times better.

I didn't use the ergo as much, because since both my kid and I run really warm, so it was uncomfortable most of the time (though now that he holds his head up, we use a backpack style carrier a lot.) On cooler days though, it was pretty nice to have.

I didn't really care about the crib, and found a decent one on Craigslist for dirt cheap (I don't really get why you need to spend more money than necessary on a crib - they have to meet fed. safety standards anyway, and it's not like the kid sleeps better in a fancier crib. I would have just done Ikea if I couldn't find a used one.) Because we're on two levels, we also have a pack n'play. If you're on a single level, I don't really know if it's necessary.

As far as smaller baby stuff, what I found most useful were those super cheap Gerber 3-ply diapers - they make great burping cloths and general wipes (I also sew fun material on them for gifts, and they're always a hit), and tonnes and tonnes of receiving blankets.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Spermy Smurf posted:


I was a tiny baby, and my wife is very small, so hopefully it's just a small baby.

Probably this. My friend's babies were full-term, perfectly healthy...but the first was a 5.5lb girl, and the second a 4.5lb boy. Totally healthy kids and perfectly proportioned, but her and her husband are both fairly petite, and now that they're in preschool/kindergarten, they're still small compared to their classmates.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Ceridwen posted:


When to deliver is a very careful balancing act, not an example of "waiting is always better". Although infants born earlier (37-39 weeks) are at an increased risk of needing some help breathing in their first couple of days, this isn't associated with long term problems. And the risk of stillbirth increases starting at 37 weeks and goes up dramatically as you approach 42 weeks, which is why doctors have moved away from allowing women to go past 41 weeks over the last 20-30 years.

No Butt Stuff, I hope the appointment on tomorrow goes well and you get to meet your baby soon!

This. The placenta isn't meant to sustain the fetus indefinitely, it does begin to degrade along with the cord, thus leading to the sudden spike in stillbirths (though often cause is unknown, and there are a zillion factors to consider.) Usually scheduled caesareans are done at 39 weeks, because this is considered the optimum time taking into account lung development and increased risk of still birth.

From the CDC (graph on page 7):
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_08.pdf

I do not think that the link between lung development and the onset of labour is necessarily causal, as often when women are at risk for premature labour, they'll be given steroids in order to speed up lung development, yet that doesn't seem to change the chances of them then going into labour (awkward phrasing, I know.)

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Awesome Kristin posted:

I have a quick question. Is there a way to change a newborn's schedule? Ben seems to have his longest stretch of sleep right after my husband and would normally wake up for the day. Because of this, I don't get any sleep at a normal hour, and end up sleeping the day away during his long naps.

Can I do something to make his longer naps and shorter feedings be at night?

This was a problem for us. My son would sleep for 5-6 hours from the get-go... between 11 am and 4-5pm. Yeah, that was awesome. This was also pretty much his schedule when he was in the womb, where he would be up all night.

What we ended up doing was not letting him sleep for longer than two hours during the day. We'd wake him up, feed him, change him, then back down. The acronym from the baby book we used (Baby Whisperer) was EASY: Eat, Activity, Sleep, and You (presumably nap time for him is you time.) The idea is that you're kind of on a three hour rotation or thereabouts, it probably varies a bit from baby to baby. At night time, we would start cluster feeding him before bedtime, and since he was pretty predictable, we would give him a dreamfeed about 20 minutes before he would have woken up for feeding (this one was difficult to do breastfeeding, so I found it easier to do with a bottle.) It kind of helped keep him in the sleep mode. It was also good to give him a bottle then, because it usually ended up being around ten or eleven that he would get that bottle, so I would go to sleep for 5-6 straight hours, his dad gave him the bottle, and then I took the 12-6 "shift." I found that this helped a lot with with my sanity, since it was a simple routine for me to remember.

The hardest thing was waking him up to eat. He was pretty determined to sleep during the daytime.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Awesome Kristin posted:

Thank you for this. I hope it helps us.


You're welcome. I thought I was losing my mind until someone recommended that book, actually. I wish I had read up on infant sleep while I was still pregnant. Trying to research it while you're dealing with it is awful, and everyone has recommendations that contradict each other (or you get the "My friend's wife sent this book to loan you, she says it works great and their kids were sleeping through the night at 6 weeks old!" and the book consists of locking the kid in a room for 12 hours and ignoring them.) Having a routine that was fairly flexible was good. The only real "rule" during the day was not letting him sleep longer than 2 hours, sometimes he woke up earlier if he was hungry.

Oh, and we didn't change his diapers at night unless he had a bowel movement, because it kind of woke him up more. Not sure how this would work if you use cloth, but the sposies would wick any wetness away.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Awesome Kristin posted:

I do everything I can to separate day and night hours. Lights are on, there's tons of talking, music or tv is on and I sing to him. We dance around and do tummy time. At night the lights are off or low, I play soft music, we do bath time and I try to get him to eat and fall asleep.

By "naps" I mean the times he should be sleeping less and being more awake between them, which should be during the day. Instead he has a block of time in the afternoon where he sleeps for 5ish hours with a sleepy feeding in between. That should ideally be at night when I'd like to get my sleep. I'm up the whole night feeding, burping, rocking to sleep, listening to him struggle with his intestines, changing him when he finally poops, then starting the cycle over again.

I think the problem might be the pooping thing. He doesn't struggle for as long, or as much during the day, and his sleeping is super solid as well. Maybe the struggling every 2 minutes for half an hour is keeping him up. Also he always has trouble getting one last burp out at night, and I never know until he's wiggling around grunting in bed.

Yeah, the first while is pretty hard. I know it can take a while, and you seem to be doing everything "right." I would keep trying with the routine, but I do wonder about the pooping thing. I don't recall (and my memory is slightly hazy), my son having any issues with bowel movements - although he would sometimes cry until he farted, at which point he was much happier. Is it fairly normal to have issues with BM's that early?

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Alterian posted:


My husband asked me yesterday when babies get their first teeth and I realized I had no clue. I should probably start reading up. We've had all the big talks about parenting styles, nutrition, etc, but realized none of us know the mechanical basics.

The nurses at the hospital showed me how to change diapers, give baths, etc. I had no idea what I was supposed to do with a baby, but he's still alive, so I haven't messed it up too badly. I tried taking a prenatal class, but it was all about labour, and nothing to do with diapers or anything, so I stopped taking it. I'm assuming that there are some that deal with it.

Family members if available are handy, but I have some friends with no nearby family who hired a postpartum doula to help them with that stuff. Depending on your budget, that could be an option.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

I don't know if you mentioned this before, and I'm sure your GP already cleared it, but is there any possibility of reflux? I know one of the pack n' plays we used had a bassinet top that you could set at an incline just for reflux-y babies who get uncomfortable laying flat. There are wedges and things you can purchase, but if he has silent reflux, he could very well be fussy because of the positioning.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

We did kind of postcard style birth announcements. The people who had already sent us gifts got theirs in envelopes with thank you notes written on the back. If they hadn't sent us anything at that point, we sent them like postcards, and did separate thank you notes afterwards if they had given us something later.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

An Cat Dubh posted:



This is totally trivial, but I decided to have my hair coloured tomorrow and told my best friend, who is not comfortable with it because it can't be said to be 100% safe. This irks me. How many things can us pregnant ladies do that can actually be considered 100% safe and why do we have to placate everyone around us?

I ate sushi throughout my pregnancy (though stayed within general fish intake guidelines), because we have a very safe sushi supply where I live, rode horses throughout my pregnancy... annnnd was in two auto collisions. A friend of mine was t-boned in her 3rd trimester, and spent a few days in the hospital getting monitored and having to get steroid shots. Nobody bitched at either of us for being in a car, but there was never ending flak for everything else. It's just one of those things. I've also had random people go up to me and bitch for breastfeeding in public, bottlefeeding in public, not having my son dressed warmly enough, having him dressed too warmly, etc. You've just basically doubled your baseline annoyance factor from your childfree days.

I do find it humorous that one of the local baby shops sells magic (albeit with fancy science words on the label) shirts and cellphone covers that protect your unborn child from cellphone radiation. Yet more ways that you can be deficient as a mother.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Whenever you feel like it. Worst case scenario, you pick up a pack of Pampers on the way home and baby can sleep in a laundry basket.

We did a shopping trip to the States (Oregon - no state taxes, and a lot of things were half the price than they were up here) two weeks before baby was born. Big items were shipped to the hotel by Amazon, and the rest we had fun shopping days. Also, people surprise you with random and unexpected awesome gifts sometimes, so it can be good to wait.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

bamthrilla posted:

http://www.familyclothwipes.com/

Also, I think most people I know who use cloth wipes cut up old receiving blankets and/or shirts. I definitely wouldn't buy cloth wipes. I use disposable because I'm too lazy and cloth diapering is about as far as I'll go on that front.

I actually started with the cloth wipes after switching to cloth diapers. They just go in the diaper pail, so the work isn't more. The warmer came with a few, I cut up a receiving blanket, and I bought some cloth diapers on etsy that came with a couple. My kid hates diaper changes, and at least the warm wipes make him a little happier about it.

Hdip posted:

The baby lost that much weight in 2 days and should have 4 wet diapers in these last 24 hours. So the pediatrician is worried about dehydration.

Wife's milk hasn't come in yet but the colostrum she got out through pumping was cloudy. So maybe that's a sign it's coming. I fed the little bit that was pumped out to him with a combination of a medicine dropper and my pinky.

We have a doula stopping by this afternoon so we are holding off on the bottle until after that.

I ended up having to supplement. The hospital I was in had the "baby friendly" certification (which I think is a bullshit designation, but whatever), and fully endorsed breastfeeding with an onsite milk bank. The nurses there, who were pretty anti-formula said that as soon as you're an "older" mother (late 20s and up), you're more likely to need supplementation, the younger mothers almost never do, and whenever you have a bigger baby (which in my area is anything 8lbs and up), you're also more likely to need to supplement. Obviously these are generalizations, but there seems to be some commonalities. They see about 7000 babies born a year, so they probably know what they're talking about in that regard.

That being said, don't get too hung up on it, what's important is that your kid gets fed. Supplementing isn't "failure" or anything, and that sort of mindset really fucks with your head.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

CravingSolace posted:

I have a question about traveling.

The flight attendants are super nice. I haul my kid all over the place, and if you ask nicely and the plane isn't full, they'll often move people so that you have a spare seat next to you. They'll give you a full on talking to when you get on the plane, as far as where the changetables are, what to do with poopy diapers, etc. When my son switched over to milk, they were always offering to fill bottles and such.

Do whatever you can to avoid layovers. I find those the worst part of travelling, at least once they're old enough to start crawling.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

dreamcatcherkwe posted:

This has never been my experience. A lot of flight attendants have been really rude. They never told me about changing tables or poopy diapers. They did tell me how to hold the baby in case of a crash landing.

That's too bad. Maybe I've just been extraordinarily lucky (or you've been really unlucky?) The only issues I've ever had are when I've had to babysit the Dad throughout the whole thing.

CravingSolace posted:

I just wish there was a way to make everyone happy, you know?

Yeah... now that you've had a kid, those days are over.

It's really more to do with your comfort level than anything, since you'll see various estimates all over the internet about age-appropriateness. Other than the "oh poo poo"-ness of being a new parent, travelling with a new baby was pretty easy (in retrospect.) They're compact, not terribly mobile, and relatively easy to entertain. Don't run out of diapers. Airports only ever seem to sell size 3 or 4, and they charge about 5x what they're worth.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Goobish posted:

I am now 9 weeks pregnant and I would just like to quickly introduce myself. I am aware this isnít a livejournal though, so this will probably be the most E/N post I make, and others will be reserved for legitimate questions. Iíve been hesitant to post because I have a mental illness.
I only just saw this, but congrats! As you probably know, one of the biggest things with mental illness is insight, so you're already in a pretty good place. I had a history of depression, and my mother suffered from rather severe mental illness, so I had myself referred into the reproductive psychiatry program while pregnant to mitigate any issues that might arise. Based on one post, you do seem to have a good idea of where you're at, so I have no doubt you'll be fine.

Lullabee posted:

I am in search of a birthing class, however the ones at my hospital are $120.00 a class and even with payment plans, I don't have the amount needed, because I want to take one in December/early January, since my due date is in February. I know I totally dropped the ball and should have registered earlier, but I can't turn back time now. So, am I royally screwed or are there cheaper classes out there?

I wouldn't worry too much if you don't get into one. Like others have said, there are resources out there that you can access. I skipped mine, and baby still got out in one piece (disclaimer: not into the natural birthing thing, and all of the ones here focussed on that.) Most people I've talked to found the best part of prenatal classes were meeting the other parents, which you can easily do through local meetup groups.

Seconding what MoCookies said about doulas in training - depending on where you are, there are often programs aimed at low-income families that involve doulas who need to satisfy practicum requirements or whatnot.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Cathis posted:

Yup, got nothing from my hospital either. Laughing is kind of OK, but I fear sneezing.

A physio (or maybe OT?) came to me in the hospital and went over c-section stuff. All I really remember that would be helpful here is to "hug" a pillow into your abdomen when you sneeze or laugh. Aside from that, basically whatever feels comfortable for you.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

I feel for you and your wife. My best friend had placenta previa, so did the whole modified best rest thing. Her caesarean was uneventful, has a healthy baby girl, but she was going insane with boredom during the pregnancy. On the bright side, I guess your wife can catch up on her reading and cable tv shows. If she knits or does anything along those lines, that might help with some of the antsiness.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Whatever you end up using, you'll use a lot of and then completely ignore the stuff you don't like. I didn't really use pants at all, but like other people said, some really like them (I figured he had the rest of his life to wear pants.) I didn't really use socks a whole lot as a new baby, but I could see if I had a girl for the next one using those little lacey socks for dress up.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

When I think of how people I know picked their OB or midwife, it was either that they were just assigned to that person (which is how mine went - my GP doesn't do obstetrics, so referred me out, and I ended up really liking my OB, even if her locums were lovely), or, if they do hunt around on their own, it's always that they were recommended to them by their friends and/or they liked their bedside manner. I've never seen anyone outside of an actual healthcare worker pick their OB based on their reputation amongst their peers.

It's really a personal choice. For me, I don't give two shits about bedside manner, and I don't care if you're an rear end in a top hat. Obviously, not everyone feels this way - healthcare is a pretty personal decision and it's always a balancing act between all the factors. When I managed to talk to some L&D nurses outside of work, it turns out that the super popular OB that everyone likes does a total hack job on his patients if there are complications. Great to chat with at the Christmas party, does all the local celebrity wives, but kind of sloppy on the actual surgery end of things if you need it.

Anyway, point being, go with who makes you feel the most comfortable and works for you. I second Taratozsk on the facility you delivery at being important as well, since day of, there are no guarantees who you're going to see.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

I loved the name Asher. It was weird though, because when I checked it on the local vital statistics, it went from not on the radar to one of the most popular boys names for the last two years. Odd, because I can't think of anyone in popular culture that could have sparked the sudden popularity. I also have a lot of non-Jewish friends naming their kid Asher. Totally came out of nowhere, from what I can tell.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Just got a positive hpt, so while early, looks like I'll be having another one soon (well, September.) So stoked.

Has anyone ever done the MaterniT21 test or anything similar. I know I'm on the cusp of "advanced maternal age" (at 31! ), so I'll probably be getting some sort of screening.

ChloroformSeduction fucked around with this message at 23:39 on Dec 28, 2012

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

OK, good to know about the MaterniT21 test. They don't offer them in Canada yet that I'm aware of, but I know my clinic in the States does, so I'll ask them their thoughts on it. I am partly interested because you can tell the gender early, which would be pretty awesome.

Ratatozsk - I started taking my son out in public within a week, I think. Just little walks around the neighbourhood, (those were pretty nerve-wracking, actually!), to the coffeeshop, fruit stand, etc. I don't recall being given any sorts of guidelines from my GP.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

frenchnewwave posted:

Nah, 31 is pretty normal age. I was 30 when I conceived and wasn't even told about the test. I did do the other non invasive screens though, that they offer to everyone.

Oh yeah, it's totally normal age to have babies now, but I remember when I was pregnant with my first at 29, the way it was explained was that 35 was AMA, but the 30-35 was considered pretty good, but hey, you're not 18. So they basically offer you the option of doing the tests then, because while your risk is low, it's still slightly elevated for a couple things so they explain it to people and give them the option.

I'm leaning towards something like MaterniT21 (there seem to be 2 or 3 options right now), just because it's non-invasive, so it makes sense to me to do that, rather than doing something like a quad screen.

Helanna - that ring sling is beautiful!

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Fionnoula posted:

It is your brain trying to protect you from further pain and it is perfectly ok.

I think this is incredibly true. Unfortunately, I know a couple mothers who've had late term losses and later, and they always have incredibly mixed feelings if they have another pregnancy. It runs the gamut from being thrilled about the new one, being someone detached, or just miserable the whole time. It's a combination of situation, personality, and crazy hormones, and it becomes a big bundled mess. Everyone copes with things differently, and there's not really a right or wrong way to do it.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

With my last pregnancy (and this one too), I just got on and off random cramps and twinges. Nothing huge, I figured it was just my insides stretching and rearranging. Is 14 weeks when it starts to lift up out of your pelvis? I think it's kind of around that time. If you're concerned, see your doctor, but it's probably just tissues stretching and the like.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Mnemosyne posted:

No, she didn't test him. I was considering asking her to, but she ordered an early lead test for him because we live in an old house which does have lead paint, and the hospital lab was unable to get blood out of him and pretty much just tortured him until I told them to stop and skip the test. Now I see why they don't generally order blood tests for babies, because that was horrible, and we didn't get any blood from it anyway.


Just as an aside, I was in getting some blood drawn, and asked the tech about a blood test that had been ordered for my son (23 months.) Technically, it should be ok at any lab, but he said not to bother and go straight to the lab at the Children's hospital. They're set up for kids and babies, they have extra staff to help, all the special needles, etc. He said it would just be torture for everyone to try and do a young child/baby blood draw at a regular lab. I did have some blood taken from him when he was a baby, and it was done at the Children's hospital anyway, and now that I think of it, it's set up completely differently than the regular bloodlab, so what he says makes sense. Chances are your ped hospital has an onsite lab as well.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/01/04/the-breast-pump-industry-is-booming-thanks-to-obamacare/

This is pretty cool actually - because of the changes to insurance rules in the States, there's a huge upsurge in breast pump sales.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

I'm actually kind of surprised that people would be upset at someone not gaining enough weight (obviously, this is different if you have ED or whatnot), just because everything I've read is that most people gain too much weight, which can cause its own problems. I gained way too much my first time around, so I'm being pretty careful this time about what I eat.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply