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Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Are these glucose tests done for everyone, or just for specific reasons? I've never heard of them before.

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Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Panne posted:

Depends on where you are. You're in Ireland if I remember correctly? I don't know how it is there, but I'm sure your doctor knows :) In Norway where I am it's not done unless there's a reason to suspect you have it so I had never heard of it before reading this thread.


Yep in Ireland. My doc was pretty useless though, told me I could keep taking amitryptaline and tramadol during pregnancy, and that I won't need a flu shot :P I suspect an ob will know for sure though!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Well, after deciding in May that it was time to start considering having a kid, we held off trying until a couple of weeks ago, now that enough time has passed since I had a vaccine (typhoid, just over 3 months ago). Tried once, then decided maybe we should wait a bit longer as I'm in the middle of a fairly stressful family time and also trying to get a promotion at work...

Period due today and nothing happened which for me was alarm bells - I'm never, ever late, and can predict it exactly. Two pregnancy tests later and 2 positives so it seems we're expecting. And it's our first wedding anniversary today as well!

So incredibly excited but so much panic as well - for all that we've been thinking of this for a while, it's suddenly very real once there's a positive test! I bought a book a while ago, on advice from this forum, "Your Pregnancy, week by week" 6th edition by Glade Curtis and Judith Schuler. Any other recommendations?

Wondering at what point it's possible to tell the gender of the baby?

Currently just feels similar to period symptoms with sore back, sore boobs, and contantly too warm. Only new symptom is disturbed sleep the last couple of weeks.

What point did you guys tell friends/family/work? A bit concerned that I will get passed over for promotion if it gets out that I'm pregnant :3: Technically illegal but I'm sure that doesn't stop companies from trying.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I intend to be working right until they kick me out of work, which is about 10 days before due date. My job is very sedentary though; I literally just sit at my desk all day, so there's no physical labour involved, and I take breaks as and when I need to. I get fully paid 6 months off with a temp filling in my job while I'm gone, but I want as much of that 6 months as possible to be for AFTER the baby is born.

Having said that, if I end up being off earlier I expect I will spend all my days playing computer games (world of warcraft... I know, the shame!) and knitting in front of the TV. Already spending my weekends knitting up baby stuff! Husband can do the cleaning at that stage; I'll turn on dishwasher and washing machine and maybe cook an easy meal occasionally, but I doubt I'll do much more than that once hugely pregnant.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I had my gallbladder taken out a couple of years ago; I was in very severe pain before they yanked it out! Really never felt anything so painful in my life.

It was only keyhole surgery, so easy recovery, but not sure what they do if you're pregnant at the time.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



The hospital I'll be having the baby in has a high C section rate too; when I heard this I informed them I wanted to avoid C section unless it was absolutely necessary, and was condescendingly told to "stop worrying about things I have no control over". Gee thanks.

Pretty sure my glucose test is at 28 weeks; I thought it sounded rather late on to be checking, but I didn't realise a false positive was more likely early on. They didn't really explain anything! Frustrating that I have no choice of hospital here; almost all of my pregnancy education has come from here, babycenter and a book!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Finally had my gender ultrasound today (elective since I get no more scans at hospital unless there's a problem) and we're having a girl!! So excited, as I always wanted a girl first, and we have so much girl clothes from 2 friends who had baby girls in the last year.

One thing I was surprised at though, was that the baby is laying straight across me (as opposed to head up / head down), and apart from flipping to face my spine for part of the ultrasound, she didn't move to be going up/down as I expected. Is that normal? She was very obliging with spreading her legs and letting us get a thorough look in both 2D and 3D though, so that was good.

One of the 3D pics we got:

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I really like the look of the Leachco Back 'N Belly pillow, and haven't bought a pregnancy pillow yet. So expensive to order it to Europe though; amazon wanted just under $100 for it including shipping :3: Seems pricey for a pillow.

Anyone in EU got a recommendation of one that is more readily available here?

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Stairs posted:

What I want to know is, is this normal with older women? I've been feeling very full and pregnant now for over a month, and I'm a bit worried because it seems too early for that.


I heard the increased belly growth is more to do with having had multiple previous pregnancies, rather than with your age.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I'm spending pretty much every weekend sat on my couch with my laptop (bought during pregnancy, to keep myself entertained!), and each evening in the bath. No relaxation problems here :D Now if only I didn't have to work during the day!! Another 12 weeks to go before I'll be stopping work, and I've had enough already.

Mostly just laziness though, rather than true discomfort. I'm more tired than usual and the hours are long (in work 11+ hours) but it's a desk job so not physically taxing at least.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Eleanor is one of the names on my shortlist too! I'm still pushing for Isobel though, and husband is resisting. We'll see...

Anyway, reading the last bunch of posts I noticed something that kind of surprised me; does each session of breast feeding really take 45 mins or an hour? I always assumed (perhaps naively!) that I could wake up, feed baby for like 10 or 15 minutes, and go back to sleep!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I'll never get to do the midwife route because of seizures; the OB is willing to let me try a "normal" birth, but seemed very doubtful that I will even last long enough to get an epidural. Pretty sure they all expect to be knocking me out for a C section!

Can anyone recommend a good book on breastfeeding? Feel like I should probably read up a bit on it. Only 27 weeks at the moment, but doesn't hurt to be prepared!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Stairs posted:

The other question is have any of you had any experience with those stretchy one size type bras on TV? My boobs are growing faster than my bra budget and I'm looking for something that will make my expanding womanhood look less like a pack of hot dogs!

I'm in love with the Genie Bras - bought a 3 pack of them at the start of the second trimester and they're soooo comfy and still fit just fine for now (27 weeks). I expect I'll need to go up a size after the babys born and my milk comes in, but I can't recommend these bras enough.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



rangergirl posted:

I am almost 16 weeks into this and I am still throwing up 4-5 times weekly and am nauseous on a nightly basis. I can't really eat and I'm actually down almost 10 pounds. At the last doctor's appointment, last week, he assured me I would start feeling better very soon. This whole time everyone has been telling me the 2nd trimester is much better and I will feel awesome. At this point I'm very frustrated...Has anyone else gotten to 16 weeks and actually gotten better or am I doomed to be one of those sick until the kid is born people??


I was sick 10+ times per day in the first trimester (weeks 7-10 were really rough) which resulted in me actually passing out from lack of food over a few days. Baby was absolutely fine, it was just me not getting enough! Even trying something like half a glass of flat lemonade (doctors advice to at least get some sugar and not faint) made me sick 3 times in the space of 2 hours on one day. In the early part of the second I was still sick every morning and occasionally a couple of times during the day. Lost around 12lb total.

It took until around 24 weeks before I stopped getting sick every day. 28 weeks tomorrow, and I have the occasional day (like today!) where I'm sick once, but that's bearable and doesn't stop me eating as normal at this stage.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Well this is what happened when I brought home my new rocking chair today:



Apparently they think its for their benefit, not me and the baby!!

We've bought a net for over the cot, but for the most part I think I'll be keeping the cats out of the baby's room. There's only one of the cats that I think will be brave enough to try sleep on the baby anyway; I reckon the others are going to be terrified.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I wouldn't say you have reason to be overly concerned; I lost quite a bit of weight in the first trimester, and didn't start regaining until the latter half of the second trimester. Even now (30w6d) I've only gained 7-8lb from my starting weight. Baby is doing great and measured "exactly right" at my last checkup - all my prepregnancy clothes still fit (and are even a little looser!), except around the waistline. I have another checkup in 3 days, and she's been kicking away quite happily all the time! My mum was much the same with her pregnancies; she was back in her old jeans 2 days after giving birth to me.

If you're concerned though, just drop in and see your doctor. I actually bought a heart doppler for myself in the early weeks of pregnancy, because it was great reassurance to always be able to check the heartbeat; once I found it at 11 weeks, I was able to consistently find it whenever I was worried. A few weeks later of course I could feel her moving and that was even better!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I'm rhesus negative (A neg) and my husband is positive (O neg) so I've had all that fun. One of my dogs (a large Boxer) jumped up and punched me in the stomach at around 21 weeks pregnant, so I had to have the Anti D shot. Bit of a painful one, but it was alright.

Now I just get regular blood tests to check my antibodies; the last test showed some, which could be a problem. They didn't really explain it too well to be honest, except to say that I need another test to double check in a couple of weeks. In any case, the risk caused by developing antibodies seems mostly for future pregnancies rather than this one, as I'm already so far along (31w3d).

Basically just try to avoid trauma to the abdomen if you are negative; it only becomes a problem when your blood mixes with baby's and antibodies start forming.

As for the glucose test, I had that around 3 weeks ago, and I love the drink that they give. Here it's Lucozade, which is one of my favourite fizzy drinks anyway, and was particularly welcome after I'd been starved for 12 hours!

For myself, I just got told today that I have PGP (Pelvic Girdle Pain) or SPD (Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction) and as usual the information I was given was very limited. I saw a physiotherapist who manipulated my hip joints etc and poked around at my muscles for a while. I didn't get given crutches or pain killers or anything - bit annoyed that today was a "good" day, because I don't think she really understood just how cripppling a "bad" day has been lately. On Tuesday I could barely walk at all without terrible pain, and even laying in bed I couldn't find a position that didn't hurt, which reduced me to tears pretty quickly because I was exhausted and paracetemol does nothing for me.

Anyway the message was to avoid doing stuff on 1 leg (as if I could at the moment!!), avoid lifting heavy stuff (duh), have warm baths and be careful on stairs. Thankfully tomorrow is my last day at work so I can at least sit at home and be a bit less mobile, but it's somewhat frustrating that the physio didn't make me feel any better at all. Next appointment in 5 weeks, when I'm 36 weeks.

Anyone else had this / can offer some advice?

Helanna fucked around with this message at 21:50 on Mar 30, 2012

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Awesome Kristin posted:

Holy crap I thought I was alone! I'm at 20 weeks and have been experiencing this for two weeks so far.

Mine kicked off around the 24week mark, and has got progressively worse since then. This last week has been the worst, but I imagine it'll get worse still! My GP recognised it as soon as I mentioned it, and advised me to get on the waiting list for physio immediately, as the appointment can take 6-8 weeks (took just over 6 weeks for me so glad I didn't wait until now to sign up!).

Thankfully for me, my work is making big redundancy cuts at the moment, with a very nice package to bribe people to volunteer, so I opted to take that and money isn't really a concern for now; it will be a few months after the baby's born and I'm still jobless! Boredom being sat on the sofa for 8 weeks is somewhat more likely right now! I've never not worked, so I might go stir crazy.

Fire In The Disco posted:

A pregnancy support belt helped me a lot with SPD the first time around

Physiotherapist gave me this stretchy elastic thing to wear on my stomach. Ridiculously uncomfortable, too tight, felt like the baby was being squeezed and my blood supply cut off! Going to buy a proper belt online that actually fits me.

Chicken McNobody posted:

Unfortunately I can only tell you what helped me for a while.

So far heat (baths, showers, hot water bottles, heating pad) has done nothing for me :( Thinking I might see if getting a good massage is any use, but somewhat concerned it'll hurt more than help! I read that the pain can continue for up to 6 years which is a scary prospect. Weeks I can deal with, even months, but years? Had to change which cot I was going to buy anyway, just in case it continues past baby birth. Wasn't going to get one with a dropside, but now it seems that would be a good idea!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I continued sleeping on my stomach for the first trimester and a large part of the second, until the belly actually got in the way. After that, sleeping on either side (with a preference for the left until pain strikes!) worked fine. You don't have to stay on your left permamently; I think I'd be crippled if I tried!

The only thing I've really avoided the whole way through is sleeping on my back. On the rare occasion I've woken on my back I've felt really, really awful, then having an ultrasound this week (laying on back!), I managed to faint. Apparently it makes my already low blood pressure go even lower!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



That picture looks like a way cuter version of your avatar :v:

Not speaking from experience, as this is first baby for me, but I'm considering getting an Implanon (implant in arm) shortly after baby born, then having it removed whenever we decide it's time for baby number 2 (probably around 2 years). Apparently the fun side effects of the pill that I hated (bad skin, weight gain, and worst of all for me the increase in migraines) are less common with the implant.

The IUD seems too long term for me, and honestly the idea freaks me out a little bit. With the implant being 3 years at a time, that should be long term enough, and if I want longer (i.e. "no more kids!") I'll be sending the husband for a vasectomy!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Well my enormous 12ft long pregnancy pillow moved in around 24 weeks, and my husband moved out into the spare room haha. Now I don't have to put up with his breathing, or his snoring, and I can take as much room as I need to get comfortable (or, as comfortable as possible at this stage...). Only 6 weeks to go and I'm yo-yoing between wanting it to be over already and being sad that I won't feel the baby kicking away inside me soon.

The sleeping arrangement works nicely for him as well I guess, since I'm not waking him up all the time with my complaining or getting up and down to go to the toilet. We'll probably continue this arrangement at least in the early weeks with baby simply so that he can get a decent nights sleep most of the time; unlike me, he will still be going to work each day!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



MissAndy posted:

Is this normal? I was kind of hoping for a brief session of "Hey, do these things but not these things, because they aren't safe", or at least a sheet of paper with some do's and do not's on it.

Sounds like all my doctors appointments :D Seen several different doctors and midwives and in general given very little information. This forum has been way more useful, and the couple of pregnancy books I picked up.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



skeetied posted:

Those aren't really meant to be multiple user pumps since milk can back up into the motor, which could technically be a safety hazard to a future user. Only the Symphony and the Lactina are certified as multiple-user pumps.

I thought the Medela ones were okay as long as you bought new tubes etc? I heard they're rented out by hospitals pretty regularly, which means multiple users.

Bought a second hand one myself as I intended to be going back to work full time after my maternity leave, though now it looks like I won't need it since I took voluntary redundancy instead :v:

Helanna fucked around with this message at 08:51 on Apr 25, 2012

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Pretty much anytime from 6 months onwards I had female work colleagues always touching my belly. I worked in a pretty big place (~900 people) so it's not like it was a few close colleagues!

I found random strangers don't tend to try, even though I'm now much larger (due in 12 days!). Very few have done so anyway, and again only women.

When visiting my family, I offered for my step-dad to feel baby kicking and he was shocked and so excited that I let him. I in turn was really surprised that he made such a big deal of it; for me it was just an idle "hey baby's kicking if you want to feel" but for him it was very personal and he would never have asked, even though he was dying to feel her kicking away in there! He had his first grandkid a few months ago, and his son's wife didn't let him touch her belly at all when she was pregnant, which he was apparently quite disappointed about.

I'm one of those weird pregnant women who actually doesn't mind people touching the belly at all though. If anything, I like all the attention, and enjoy being pregnant for the most part.

If I liked kids more I'd be tempted to have a whole brood, just so I could be pregnant lots of times! As it is, I don't really like children a whole lot, so I'll see how I feel about my own before I make plans to have more!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Well... I had my baby! Nothing went as planned, and it was fairly traumatic, but still worth it. I keep staring at her, can't believe I grew a human!

It all kicked off on Monday evening; I had been up almost all of Sunday night due to disruption from the neighbours, and realised by Monday evening that baby had been unusually quiet; I wasn't even sure I'd felt 10 movements all day. So I went off to the emergency room to get checked out, expecting to be told she was fine and sent home. I was 40w6d at that point.

Monitoring and ultrasound confirmed little movements, and lowered fluid, so they admitted me and kept monitoring me for a few hours. Baby heart rate went high for quite a while, and the decision was made to go ahead and induce labour by 1pm on Tuesday. Prostaglandin gel was given, and all ticked along nicely for a few hours, contractions got going early evening, though nothing strong. The plan was to break my waters at 6am if I didn't progress overnight myself.

Went to bed around 10:30pm with some paracetemol, and woke less than an hour later, experiencing some quite intensely painful contractions. Wasn't worried, just told nearest midwife that I'd like to have some pethidine to reduce pain and help me sleep for a while. They put me back on the monitor, and weren't happy with baby's heartrate being too high again. Waited, watching, while my contractions got worse fast, and were soon on top of each other. Almost constant pain, which I was coping very badly with.

Doctor was called, who confirmed that I was only dilated to 2cm but my uterus was "hyperstimulated", and he decided to "wait and see" how things went, refusing to give me the pethidine. I was allowed the gas and air, which helped a little but I was soon incoherent with pain. Eventually he broke my waters, and the stress and pain triggered my seizures (reflex anoxic shock). For the first time in my life, I had chain seizures; literally every 10-30 seconds, I had an "absent episode" whereby I went limp, then seized, but could hear everything around me. The doctor high-tailed it out of there fast, and the midwives were left to cope with me.

Thankfully the midwives were far more interested in getting me pain relief and I got an epidural pretty fast. My husband and mother arrived at the hospital at that point, and things calmed down. The epidural allowed me to function, and I progressed to 9cm by 5:30am. Unfortunately then I stalled, and was still 9cm at 7am. Doctor was called because my temperature went up, as did baby's heart rate. Another check at 7:30am showed my cervix closed to 5cm again, and baby moved back up and in some distress, so I was whisked off for a C section.

I had desperately wanted to avoid surgery, but by that point I was exhausted and just grateful that it would soon be over. Isobel Fiona was delivered at 8:11am, a whopping 9lb 1oz! Doctors had assured me she would be "maybe 8lb, very average sized". I promptly seized some more on the operating table (I'm helpful like that!) so it took a while to get stitched up, but was soon in recovery with baby breastfeeding like a champ!





One of the midwives told me that I shouldn't give her a dummy until 1 month old, or I will ruin breast feeding. That can't be true, surely? She was sucking her fingers as soon as she was born (as in first pic!) so I thought a dummy would be better for the times that she's not feeding. So far she's happily sucked dummy to soothe herself to sleep in her crib, and is feeding great when I offer (every 3h, or whenever she demands it herself!).

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Looking for opinions on how hard it is having babies close together. I just had my first daughter 7 weeks ago, and despite breastfeeding my period started up again so presumably I'm fertile again. I was really hoping for a few months of no period, specially as I'm even pumping extra for a milk bank.

My husband thinks this is a sign that we should have babies close in age (nothing new really, he's always been of that opinion). I intended to wait 2+ years, but now I'm not sure.

Current baby is super easy; she's a happy little thing, and already reliably sleeps 7 hours through the night (8 last night!) followed by 2-3 further hours after a feed, and also naps well most days. I lost 25lb of baby weight already, but it was a caesarean - I read that I should wait over a year before getting pregnant again?

Mostly I just wonder how my sanity would be tested with 2 babies under 18 months, as opposed to having a 2-3 year gap.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Definitely sounding like I should stick with original 2+ year plan! I think hormones just making me feel like having another baby; head knows it wouldnt be the best idea yet.

Bonus baby poop question: she is breastfed and pooped several times a day until this week. But now she had diarrhea on Saturday night and Tues night, with no other pooping in that time. She's eating well, farting a lot, and plenty of wet nappies. Wondering if it's anything to be concerned about / if I should give her anything to make her poop more. I can feel her belly gurgling a lot but she doesnt seem distressed. Most of what I googled suggests breastfed babies shouldnt get constipated :3:

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



dreamcatcherkwe posted:

Breastfed babies can go up to 10ish days without pooping without worry. It might make them uncomfortable but it's okay and not a sign of a problem as long as they aren't dropping weight and are still having lots of wet diapers.

She isn't constipated unless she's pooping out hard pellets. Not pooping doesn't mean constipation.

Wow 10 days, I'd be panicking at that long! Even Saturday-Tues, I'd said to my husband I was going to take her to the doctor if she didn't poop by Weds morning. I'm just used to her pooping all the time I guess! Definitely no hard poops from her, ever.

Saw my lactation consultant today, and found out Issy's tongue tie has started healing back again, which explains why I've had some pain when feeding her this week. Really sucks, because we've already had it snipped once. She needs her lip tie cut as well, so it looks like I'll have to get the tongue tie snipped again at the same time. Lip ties aren't really corrected in Ireland at the moment, so I have to go to the UK to get it done.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Alterian posted:

When I pointed out how other places like Europe, its rare to have it done, she freaked out more saying that's not true, all western places do it, etc etc.

Having lived in UK, France and now Ireland, I don't know anyone who has circumcised their child, even for religious reasons. It's not even mentioned at the hospital etc so it's a complete non-decision for the average parent here. Honestly, I only ever heard of circumcision because of the internet :v:

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



My daughter is 12 weeks this week, and still seems to poop only 1-2 times a week. She only seems to fuss a bit on the day she decides to poop, and then is back to being in a lovely mood immediately afterwards! We don't give her anything to make her poop though.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I know my local hospital likes to give baby straight to the mother for skin to skin and breastfeeding straight away, but it's not always possible. For myself, I had an emergency C section so they had to clean up and check the baby and weigh her. They even got her put in a nappy, dressed and swaddled before she was put on my chest, while I was being stitched up. My husband then got to hold her for a while, until I was brought into the recovery room, and only then did I get to attempt breastfeeding and cuddle with her properly.

We've done just fine so far, and still breastfeeding at almost 12 weeks; intend to continue until a year. Imo the "sacred hour" concept is less important than the support you get for breastfeeding afterwards.

Here most women bottle feed and most of the midwives weren't so helpful with breastfeeding issues. We only succeeded because I was so determined to make it work despite the pain I had when she fed, and saw a private lactation consultant who found my daughter's tongue tie and made a referral for me to get it fixed, despite most doctors being against fixing it here unless there are speech problems.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



At my ultrasounds I was told that generally it's harder to be wrong if they say it's a boy. Actually they said that if they see "dangly bits", they don't just disappear by birth, whereas seeing a lack of "dangly bits" (seriously, their words lol) could just mean he's being shy.

We had loads of scans, and every single one after 18w said girl, so I loaded up on pink stuff. Thankfully they were right; with the amount of floral frilly stuff I bought, I would have had a very gender confused baby if she'd turned out a boy! I had a gut feeling she was a girl at the first scan at 8 weeks, but I still had a tiny doubt right until she was born.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



On the swaddling front though, not all babies like it; don't buy loads of special swaddle blankets until you know! I expected to be swaddling my baby, but she screamed if wrapped up, whereas she was delighted kicking around. Since birth she has slept in a starfish sprawl, so swaddle blankets wasted on her.

Edit: I found this really interesting : http://mothering.com/parenting/the-question-of-routine-swaddling

Helanna fucked around with this message at 19:10 on Sep 11, 2012

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



We've done a set bedtime routine since birth; she gets fed, then her bath, massage with lotion, sleepsuit, then fed to sleep. As a newborn it tended to be quite late (around 10pm) and I would go to bed at the same time to maximise sleep. Gradually we brought it back, a half hour at a time, aided by a blackout curtain to make it seem later!

Now (3 months) she's usually in bed by 7pm, and if it gets as late as 8pm she gets pretty screamy tired. Sometimes she sleeps straight through til early morning, or like last night she woke for a feed at 2am, 6am, and then got up at 8:30. Doing the same routine every night really helps I think.

Helanna fucked around with this message at 11:13 on Sep 15, 2012

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I didn't even know there was such thing as baby detergent! I just use any "non-bio" type, and we've done fine.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Is this a US thing maybe? I've never been told to buy a different detergent here (UK / Ireland), and the only reason I use non-bio is because I had sensitive skin as a child and my mum advised me to avoid bio liquid with my own baby in case she reacted to it as well. So far she has perfect skin, no rashes or redness at all after the first few days in hospital.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



We found the infant bath more hassle than it was worth; we ended up bathing her in the sink when she was tiny, and after about 3-4 weeks we moved to the big bath, either co bathing or (more often) just kneeling at the side of the bath to support her. She's just starting to try strain to sit up now, so we're heading towards bath seat time!

With future babies I won't be bothering with an infant bath at all, it was one of the least used items I bought.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Not a fan of induction myself; I had the prostaglandin gel at 41w, which I didn't react well to for some reason (went from no labour to "oh my god I might die why aren't I getting any breaks between contractions?!"). The doctor broke my water to "speed things up" and I ended up with an epidural because I couldn't stay conscious (seizure condition) through back to back contractions that weren't actually doing a whole lot, followed by pitocin and finally an emergency C section when everything stalled, baby's heart rate went up and my temperature shot up too.

The experience was horrifying enough that for the first few weeks after birth I maintained I would be having elective C sections for any future children. Now, I'm more in favour of trying to avoid induction if at all possible and hopefully things will go smoother without the prostaglandin/pitocin.

That said, I had no choice about the induction, as baby wasn't moving much and my amniotic fluid level had dropped enough that they were worried. If you have any choice about it, avoid induction!

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I did 2 positive tests at home (very faintly positive), period was late, and that was good enough for me. Went to the doctors a couple of days later, and they did another 2 urine tests because their first test didn't look positive and the second barely showed anything. Even then the doctor was sceptical and was sort of "we'll see". I doubted my sanity a little, but went and bought an expensive digital ClearBlue test which clearly wrote "Pregnant" on the result window! It took another few days before I was getting strong positives on normal tests. I'd say the one the doctors use is just not very good!

And congratulations!

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Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Ratatozsk posted:

General question here for those a few weeks/months post-partum - when did you start taking your kids out in public? Was this based on your own comfort, or were you given particular guidelines by your pediatrician?

I took my daughter shopping with me the day I was let out of hospital after a Csection, so she was 4 days old - we weren't told to keep her away from people. We saw plenty of people in the first week or so, and I took her into my workplace at under 2 weeks old to meet colleagues. I then flew to visit family with her when she was 3 weeks old, and at 6.5 months old now she has been on 8 flights. She's had 1 cold, that was very minor really, when she was a couple of months old, other than that we've had no health problems.


Papercut posted:

When did people start wearing their babies? We have an Ergo and a Mobi but he doesn't seem to enjoy either one. Do they need time to get used to it? With the Ergo in particular, the instructions say that their legs should hang out the sides, but he's not big enough for that and it seems like his legs just get smashed into a kneeling position.

Also did anyone have problems with oversupply or over-active letdown? We're getting all of the typical symptoms of it (gasping and fussing during feeding, tons of gas, etc), and the IBCLC's haven't been any help at all. Did anyone try the FDBF method (full drainage and block feeding)?

I found my daughter did better in a ringsling as a small baby. She was happy in it, and even slept quite happily. This was her going through the airport at 4 weeks old:



I had terrible oversupply for the first while, and she was getting way too much foremilk, and had green poop for ages. It didn't help that she was tongue tied too, so not feeding very efficiently. Then again the only reason that she didn't lose weight while waiting for tongue tie to be dealt with is that she didn't have to make much effort to have milk squirted at her with force! I ended up only feeding her on one side per 4 hours; it seemed to work well, and my supply regulated a bit. Still have a high supply though, even now. I pump milk to donate to a milk bank for babies in the NICU.

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