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Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


I signed up for the group, first name Jade

(USER WAS PUT ON PROBATION FOR THIS POST)

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Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


AlistairCookie posted:

Anyone else have their babies size estimated before birth? How accurate, or not, was it? I'm just curious.

I had one done at 38 weeks, because I always measured like 8 weeks ahead from about 20 weeks on. she always had her butt sticking out. When I did go in at 38 weeks to make sure she was flipped the right way ( again the butt made it hard to tell) they told me she would be over 10 pounds and 45 cm inches long. She was 7 pounds, 13 ounces and 53 cm long. So yeh, it was worth it to know that she was flipped, but crap for everything else.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Panne posted:

This is so sad. Why isn't there maternity leave for school? Not to be a downer, but she might not be able to go through with this, if not physically then mentally. Good luck!

There should be. I had to take a year off and postpone my masters, though I dunno how Ariza's wife will manage a residency one week post-partum. Your wife has balls of steel to even try that. You two should set up a system to watch for PPD though, if she can't miss more than five days, you'll really want to stay on it. Whatever ends up happening, just support her no matter what. I've run into a bog of trouble breast feeding the last month, and I would be a psychotic, weeping bundle 24/7 without my partner's support and love. Good luck, and congrats on the baby as well.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


LuckyDaemon posted:

Whoa, I didn't know it was so common to dilate weeks before your due date. I'm 36 weeks and have some mean BH contractions very often. They don't hurt, they're just intense and occasionally I feel a little stretch in my cervix.

My CNM says that I don't need to worry about them unless they get painful--but if you dilate early is it safe to continue having sex? She doesn't bother with cervical checks during pregnancy unless there's a problem or if we have to consider an induction, but I'd hate to be a few cm open and having something up there. I mean, I know the bag of waters keeps baby safe, but my sister walked around with a slow amniotic leak without realizing it for weeks so what if, what if? :ohdear:

I have an irrational fear of infection as someone I know lost their baby to chorioamnionitis. I'm normally very evidence-based but this issue freaks me out!

I dialated early and had sex up till I had Erin, and it was fine. My midwife checked after finding out I was at 3 cm since 35 weeks and nothing happened. Which was good because the last month I was loving insatiable sex wise.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Brennanite posted:

Thanks for all the help. It's not all-day (thank goodness), but late in the evening mostly. Elevating my head does help, and I'll try to scatter more small meals in. The protein idea seems particularly good as I need to increase my intake anyway.

Now, another question: how did/do you find birthing classes? My practice offers a two-class seminar. The first class is pre- through post-labor and the second is newborn care. Personally, I think it takes more than an hour to be adequately prepared, but maybe that's just me.

My birthing class was about 8 hours, minus breaks for lunch and whatever. It covered pretty much every birth scenario and then a bit about newborn care and breast feeding. It was advertised at the midwife clinic I went to. It probably depends on what type of birth you want and where you want to have it. Since everyone at mine was using a mid wife, it was about a lot of pain relieving methods to cope with pain and whatever, since they don't do interventions unless the patient requests poo poo like an epidural or the gas. Check your hospital or birth centers, see if they are running anything, or ask your doc or midwife if they can recommend anything besides that.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


We have the Sleep Sheep. It is a godsend. She's had since she was a month old, and like the Stream and rain functions. The whales however are some demon spawn whispering evil things to her or some poo poo because if they get turned on she flips her poo poo. She's also not too happy about the Ocean waves one, but she also doesn't like crashing waves at the beach either when we go so I dunno.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


sheri posted:

I have a friend who is about 8 months pregnant with her first child. Her and her husband are very intent on doing things naturally, which I find great. My only concern is that they are planning a home birth. I know some (lots of?) people here have had home births, and I have nothing against them. My reason for concern here is that this is her first child and no one really knows what the delivery will be like being that she hasn't been through one before. I'm not going to try to talk her into or out of any decision, but is there any advice or anything I can offer them to make sure both mom and baby are healthy?

I had my daughter at home, and she was my first. As long as your friend is low risk, there is nothing to be worried about. If you are really that worried about, you could have her ask her midwife in what situations she transfers, what her transfer rates are like, if she has experience with shoulder dystosia, and has she given an episiotemy before.

Also tell her to have hot showers during labour, just getting into the tub and having my man apply counter pressure to my lower back was one of the most relaxing, pain relieving thing in the world. Also put a bag of grapes in the freezer to much on, the sugar will help and it's better than just the water and poo poo they allow you at the hospital.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Grayscale Rainbow posted:

TL;DR - I'm 20 weeks and still nauseous after having rather bad morning sickness. Can I expect to be nauseous throughout the rest of the pregnancy?

I ended up throwing up, even on a prescription right up until the day I had my daughter. I was hospitalized for it twice. If I were you I would keep up with the prescription and keep a few wheat crackers or the natural ginger gravol on you as well. Some people have luck with some other methods, like eating in bed, a million small meals, chewing candy and poo poo, but nothing worked for me except giving birth.

As for breastfeeding, I had to stop just shy of 8 months because of problems that arose. Pumps don't do poo poo for me, so now she is on formula. It bothers me a loving lot sometimes but she is doing much better now on formula than stressed out and not getting enough to eat on boob.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


opie posted:

Did anyone else not have the group b strep test at 35-37 weeks? I was expecting it at today's 36 week visit, and it didn't happen, nor was I asked to schedule it. I thought maybe since I was having a planned c-section that was why, but I'm reading that it should be done for every pregnancy. I'll call the doctor tomorrow and see what's up.

I had mine between 37 and 38 if I remember correctly, because results can change between a four or five week period. My midwife did it later so she didn't have to do two for patients.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Dr. Octagon posted:

So I've been following this "Baby Project" thing that NPR has been doing. Last week, this lady posted a picture of her swollen, pregnant feet that made me gasp. (With all the nausea talk, I didn't want to just slap that picture up in the thread.)

She just had her baby, so she was close to the end... but still. Please, someone tell me that this won't happen to my feet. This is not normal, right? If I looked down and saw that, I would be horrified.

No that is not even close to normal.

What the gently caress, did she like have like super water retention or whatever the gently caress? My feet didn't swell at all, and I routinely walked around in 40+ degree weather for the summer months. To avoid the feet swelling, as stupid as it sounds, drink lots of fluid, like 2 liters or more per day.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


legbeard posted:

I have friends that I can call. But I don't really want to bother them everyday. The hormones are really getting to me this past week. I've pulled out the puzzles, the books, and the movies, but really there's not enough to keep me occupied all day long. I'm not freaking out or anything, but I think it's bad for me to worry so much. When I start worrying, then I start looking up every little detail that I can, when I should probably be distracting myself.

Honestly, there's not a lot of positive stories about twins out there. Everyone I've talked to has horror stories, and there's really not a lot of good resources specifically about twins.

I'm a twin and my mother raised my sister and I herself. She breastfeed and cloth diapered us for a year, and is generally a very informative person without being in your face. If you need any stories and anything I can relay them for her. There are also a few other goon parents with twins that can be helpful.

For the hormone worries, what I found helpful was either taking a long soak in the tub with a good book, or biking or hiking if you aren't on bedrest. I rode my bike till I was just over 7 months pregnant, I did get a lot of poo poo from people when they realized I wasn't just a fatty, but gently caress them. The more active I kept, the less I had to brood over everything, like the fact we were going to be moving and house hunting during the end of my pregnancy, the lovely OB I had for the first half, and the fact that me and my husband are both still in school. As an added bonus it also kept my mind over my terrible morning sickness that lasted till I gave birth.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


legbeard posted:

Sorry in advance for all the questions, these are just some of the things I have been worried about.

I have been wondering if it was possible for me to still use cloth diapers. It seems like the amount of laundry that I would have to do would be staggering. How did your mom do it? Did she breastfeed at the same time or one after the other? How did she find time to sleep? How do you get both babies out to the car without leaving one of them alone for a minute? Did your mom work during the first year? Would she have any advice on how to continue breastfeeding while still being able to work? If I use one crib for the both of them at first, about how long will it take before I have to get them separate beds?

She had us in disposables till we were about a month or so, just to get us past the newborn mecomium stage. This was 23 years ago too, so I think she had diaper service on two days of the week or something, the rest of the week she just did a load of laundry every day. It's really not that much extra, especially for tiny diapers. I was six pounds, my sister was 4 pounds 13 ounces, we both used extra small cloth diapers for months. Just soak them or rinse all the gross bits off first. I know some places are getting back into diaper service, for the whole green movement, try calling around to the hippy baby stores in your area, they should know more.

For breastfeeding, if we both woke up at the same time for boob, she would tandem nurse using the football hold. If not, she would wake one of us up before hand, empty one boob, then the other one would be stirring at that point for the other boob. She also used a pump and ended up storing gallons of milk,s he filled a chest freezer and end up donating a bunch to the preemies in the NICU. She went back to work when we were 16 months and she had a steady baby sitter. We're in Canada though so our Maternity benefits are pretty good.

For the car thing, check Craigslist or Kijiji for a double stroller, you can get them pretty cheap off that. Then just get two bucket seats/convertible seats for your car. Take one baby out and in the stroller and then the other. She said after the first couple of times, it was really quick, less than a minute for both of us. There is also a couple of pictures of her wearing us, one on the front one on the back, so that is another option if you want to go that way.

Crib- she used one crib for both of us till we were a little bit past a year old, it will depend on how much they move around. My daughter is a terrible flailer and ends up traversing her whole crib multiple times at night. After that, she used a twin bed (har har) and we slept on that with rails attached till she got bunk beds.

As for the sleep thing, sleep when they sleep if you can, the first month or so will be rough when they wake up a lot, but after that you can try to get them on a scheduale. It's not a huge deal for single babies usually but for multiples it will keep you sane.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Doom Catcher posted:

How many of you were NOT able to determine gender?

We never found out. The first two to try were failures, she just mooned us with her legs folded up tightly. After that, it was never a big deal. I doubt I'll find out when we decide to have other kids. Rarely in life do you get really nice surprises like that, and with all the gender neutral clothing it's easy to dress a kid without sticking them in the 'wrong' colours. This makes us the odds one out though, since everyone and their dog finds out the gender for their baby at like 16 weeks here if possible.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


starshine posted:

I went to my OB for my first "confirm pregnancy" appointment which happened to be less than two weeks before moving from the USA to Canada. Up here, I realized my only reasonable choice for care was with a midwifery practice, and a home birth would save me a lot of money. Holy crap - in hindsight I'm so grateful for both of those things. Having experienced both OB care and midwife care, I'd recommend a midwife to anyone who can... my "short" appointments were 30-45 minutes and most were closer to an hour. The midwives answered all my questions without making me feel like I was stupid or wasting their time; they asked me about my nutrition, supplements, birth plans, fears about birth, local support, etc. Then all your [3+] appointments for the first two weeks postpartum are in your home, whether your baby was born there or in a hospital. I really hope this profession makes a re-entry into western healthcare in the coming decades, because women with low-risk pregnancies could be so much better taken care of. My midwife is 35 and has attended a full university course and over 700 births - that is an expert of their field.


Can't quote this enough because it's true. I was with an OBGYN till I moved at 28 weeks and he sucked dick. Never did a glucose test, his nurses were cunts and everyone at the practice treated me like some knocked up teen slut because I was 23, and their ideal parents were like 30+. When I moved, the doctor he was supposed to refer me too never got back to me after three weeks so I went to a midwife center and begged them to take me. I end up getting a spot with a new midwife, she had finished school in May, and was going to start delivering on her own on October 1st, my due date was the 10th.

Even with a relatively 'green' ( she spent two years shadowing older midwives as part of her four year program, she treated me with more respect, and consideration that the rear end in a top hat doctors did. I had my daughter at home with no problems, and any subsequent kids I have, I will be going back to the center.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


FretforyourLatte posted:

Re: those leg cramps, everything I have been reading indicates there is actually no connection to needing more potassium or calcium, but hey, it sure can't hurt to have more of both of them in my life and I love yogurt anyway. Didn't get them last night at least, but the night before when they were terrible and recurring was an unusual event and not a constant problem. Hopefully it won't persist like that because I've got a long way to go.

I found if I didn't eat a banana a day, I got them bad at night when I was asleep. I could feel them coming on though by the tightening in my calf and would half wake up and point my toes at my face and it would prevent them from becoming full blown charlie horses. Weird but effective, if you're aware enough when sleeping, you can try that. It works for charlie horses during the day for my hubby too, during class and co op he ends up sitting a lot and gets them sometimes.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


MoCookies posted:

I'm confused about the pros/cons of getting antibiotics during labor, with regards to trying to prevent group B strep infection in a newborn. I don't know if I'm GBS+ yet, but I've had a hard time coming across any reputable-looking info on the side-effects. Most everything I've found simply says that GBS infection can be really bad in rare cases, so everybody gets antibiotics, and that's that. Personally, I'm not totally comfortable with the idea of pumping my newborn full of antibiotics, and my midwives are frustratingly neutral on the subject. They did warn me that if I need to be transferred to the hospital for some reason (instead of giving birth in the birth center), then there would be a lot of pressure from the hospital staff to simply have the antibiotics. At the birth center, it's totally my choice.

Has anybody else been given this choice?

I tested positive and had the antibiotics with my home birth, it took five minutes each to get three doses during the twelve hours of labour my midwife was with me. Also they will give it to the baby if you are positive and don't choose to have the IV drip anyways, because if the baby dies from it, they are going to protect their asses as much as possible. There is really no reason not to get the drip if you test positive, just because do you really want to chance something happening to your little one?

Panne, here they only give the antibiotics to those who test positive.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


VorpalBunny posted:

You need to read the birth story where the mother gave birth in the toilet. I forget who it was, but she did the same thing (laboring at home) and BOOM - baby in the toilet.

Someone have a link to that epic post?


This is the version from the Goon parenting board.

quote:

So I had a long first labor and poo poo. Two and a half days or whatever. This is not that story.

When I was pregnant with Pete, I knew that my labor would probably be shorter—but shorter than two and a half days is still pretty long, so I wasn’t that excited. I read Spiritual Midwifery, which is a totally nuts book that helped me a lot, and then on a Friday night when my cervix was ripe, I took castor oil, pooped until I could poop no more, and went to bed. At 9:27 the next morning, I woke up in labor. The contractions were pretty intense, but I knew that they could and would get worse, so I was nervous about telling anyone that I was in labor; I told my husband, my mother, and a friend that I “might” be in labor, and then I went to take a bath, taking with me a Green Arrow collection to read between contractions.

I had worried that the bath would slow my contractions, but after awhile I realized that I wasn’t able to hold the book while contracting, and that I didn’t seem to have much time to read in between, and it seemed wise to get out and try timing a few of these contractions. I was pretty sure that we wouldn’t be going to the hospital until evening, but boy, this seemed to be going pretty strong! I called my husband into the bedroom and asked him to keep time while I labored on the bed—after two contractions, he said “Those were two minutes and forty-five seconds apart. We have to go to the hospital!” I told him that they needed to be consistently close together, and that we needed to time some more of them—after two more contractions, he didn’t tell me how long it had been, just left the room and called the midwives. Alone in the bedroom, I definitely had a small freakout: No loving way could I do this for another twelve hours. But okay, lady, the only way out is through, etc. While I was on the bed trying to relax and surrender to the contractions, there was a push. It didn’t feel like I had pushed, and I certainly hadn’t decided to push, but something had been pushed and it felt as though something had moved. I went into the bathroom, stood over the toilet, and tried to feel whether the thing I could reach was the baby’s head or my bag of waters, but couldn’t tell at all. I yelled to my husband (who was on hold), “I’m having the baby now!” He asked what he should do, and I told him to call 911. I had another big, involuntary push, and Pete’s head came out, and I knew that it would be bad to leave him like that, so I pushed one more time and he fell into the toilet. I scooped him up and sat down, hugging him to my breast. I grabbed a bath towel (happily, our towels are red) and wrapped it around him, then held him against my chest and delivered the afterbirth. It was 1 p.m. The paramedics arrived soon afterwards and took us to the hospital, but we were fine and he is great.


For the birth, I didn't mind sharing it and there ended up being 9 people in my bedroom. I think the best part was sharing the experience with my Grandmother, she had several surgeries to fix her eyesight in the past few years and has regained enough vision that she can see faces again. For her five kids, she was put under the twilight sleep and wouldn't wake up to see them for hours, or in the case of one of my uncles, a day and a half. She briefly saw my mother for thirty seconds before they knocked her out for 18 hours. Sharing Erin's birth was one of the nicest gift she has ever received in her life.

After she was born, everyone left my room and me and her and Matt got to cuddle together for an hour skin to skin before the midwives cleaned her up and measured her and did all the rest of the stuff. Our family members got to meet her the next day for the first time in person.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Y'all must have lovely stores or something because I have no trouble finding cloths that aren't terrible, cliche baby poo poo.

As for not being able to buy stuff, Erin is the first grandkid and great grandkid on both sides, so everyone went nuts buying her stuff. Me and Matt just took the money we had put aside to get her a crib, stroller and clothes and poo poo and put it in an account for her, before she was born she had over 2k in a savings account for when she turns 18.

We didn't find out her gender until she was born but I was sure we were having a boy, any dreams I had was with a son. When she came out sans penis I had maybe two seconds of sadness and nothing since then, because I have a beautiful little girl and that's all that really matters. If the depression continues, or affects the way you interact with your child SEEK HELP QUICKLY, it could be a serious case of baby blues or PPD.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


I planned on it, and got five different styles of carriers. Then I tried doing it and she screamed bloody murder nonstop in all but the crotch dangler, that she would tolerate for twenty minutes or so for about two weeks, after that is was back to screaming bloody murder. It was comfortable to wear the carriers at least :(

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Chiming in that ultrasounds for sizing are a crap shoot at best. I went in at 38 weeks to see if she had finally turned after being head up till 37 weeks and they gave me a weight estimate of 10 pounds 6 ounces. I had a home birth and she came out at 7 pounds 13 ounces. So take the ultrasounds for a grain of salt.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Cage Kicker posted:

Question for anyone with a little one 6-8 weeks, if you keep them balanced can they basically stay standing on their own?

Yeh it`s fine for them to stand with help. Erin would always stand and stomp her feet on people`s laps instead of sitting. When you did try to sit her in anything she was always stiff as a board till you tickled the back of her knees.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


If you are really that freaked out by hospitals and medical poo poo and plan on keeping/having this baby, you may want to look into a midwife/home birth instead of planning a c-section at 13 weeks. You will still have to go to exams and what not, but the care between a obgyn and a midwife is loads different and I think a midwife would be better in your particular case. Unless you live in the states or something and insurance is a problem. Having the baby at home will ease your anxiety and you will be in charge of whatever happens to you.

One of the mothers in my mom and tots group sounds a lot like you, she freaked the gently caress out during delivery because of a previous bad experience with a dentist pulling a tooth when she was 12. They needed orderlies to hold her down for basic poo poo like monitering the baby's heart rate, which they normally do EVERY 15 minutes. It ended up with her strapped to the table, sedated, she had her baby by c-section and was put under psychiatric watch for 72 hours because she was deemed a hazard to herself and others. She didn't get to see or hold her baby boy for four days. If you are indeed as bad as you say you are, even with therapy, a hospital birth may put you in the same situation. She ended up with PPD after and it's only now 18 months after that she is recovering.

I switched from an OBGYN to a midwife when I was 28 weeks and after I did, I was honestly able to enjoy the last few weeks or my pregnancy, even with terrible morning sickness. I had a homebirth, for the 24 hours I laboured, I wandered around my house, talking to my husband/family, ate frozen grapes and had three hour long hot showers for my lower back pain (FYI for anyone with back labour, warm water feels better than an orgasm). I felt safe and secure and was able to focus on what was happening to my body as it went through the different transitions, not on whether or not the next person who came into my room thought by hour 12 I should get ready for surgery.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


The Young Marge posted:

Anybody breastfeed and NOT co-sleep? Our little guy sleeps in his crib in his own room. Our bed is too small for co-sleeping - I get crowded out on a nightly basis. I wanted to have him in a cradle next to my side of the bed, but there wasn't enough space (we have a little house with small rooms.) I'm quick to respond when I hear him on the baby monitor and he seems totally fine, but I feel guilty, like he's not getting enough contact with me or something, and might be missing feeding opportunities. He's a happy baby and is gaining weight steadily, though. He wakes up 2 or 3 times in the night, eats and gets a diaper change, and goes back to sleep.


I breast fed and didn't start co sleeping till she was 10 months old at the end of August, she stayed in a bassinet at the end of the bed or by my side of the bed. I am desperately trying to get her back into the crib because co-sleeping is loving terrible and everyone hates it. She and I are both light sleepers, while hubby is a medium sleep, so every time she twitches I get woken up, and if I move, she wakes up, then kicks/headbutts matt till he wakes up.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Sarsaparilla posted:

Anyone have any secret burping techniques for newborns? I cannot seem to get her to burp after feeding. I finally give up, put her down, then 30 minutes later she's in a fit from gas.

Erin was really, really terrible to burp, the only thing that worked, sorta sometimes, was to sit her on our knees, lean her a little forward while cupping her chin in the groove between thumb and forefinger and rub her back up and down firmly like mad.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


car dance posted:

The one thing that I thought was kind of abnormal is that I'm almost 39 weeks and she hasn't checked how dilated or effaced I am. Her explanation is because it doesn't really matter unless I go late: I could be 2cm and 50% effaced for weeks before I go in to labor and she only really checks at 40 weeks to make sure I'm close and not going to go over.

My midwife was the same though she gave me the option of having her check at 38 weeks, more for my piece of mind than anything. Normally they don't do it till 40 weeks. I got her to check and see and I was 3 cm already and the baby's head was engaged and I still didn't end up going into labour till 40 weeks 3 days. So not checking isn't abnormal for a midwife.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


car dance posted:

Yeah, I think it's definitely not really in my interests to have things checked too often. I obviously haven't had it done yet but I hear it hurts and is uncomfortable and I'd rather just go in to labor anyway if it's happening on its own. I guess I should say it's abnormal in comparison to this baby board I read where women are checked by their OBs starting at 36 weeks. But these women are also having an ultrasound every month and their membranes swept (:gonk:).

It doesn't hurt at all, it's a bit uncomfortable but it's like a pap test in that regard, except my midwife didn't use the spreader thing and just used two fingers. You may ending up with a bit of spotting after which is normal.

RE postpartum bleeding: The first day after as the heaviest day, after that it was less than a period flow and mine had stopped by 2 weeks. I had a few spots the first time we had sex again at 4 weeks but never got my period back till 9 months, right after I had to stop breast feeding. Hoping the next one I have, barring any nursing problems, I can breast feed longer and won't get my period back for like 2 years!

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Randomity posted:

I had an ultrasound at 38 weeks because the doctor couldn't tell if the baby was head down and just wanted to make sure she was in the right position.

Had same sort of deal, had one at 34 weeks, she was head up, had one again at 38 weeks and she had flipped. They were quick two minute ones, I didn't see the screen at all during. Could be something similar for you if the OB is unsure.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Colton posted:

My son, Max, is 6 weeks old and ever since he turned 2 weeks old he has been pooping very infrequently. He's down to pooping once a week now. When he does it's normal looking (so we know he's not constipated), there's just a week's worth of poo in one diaper. We know it's getting close to pooping day when he starts being very fussy, straining, and just generally being very unhappy. We've tried karo syrup in a bottle, tummy massage, warm baths, anti-gas drops, colic drops, burping, putting him in his swing.. everything we can think of. Any advice for how we can get Max to work it out of his system more regularly? I read somewhere that at 8 weeks he'll have figured out the basics of pooping and things may resolve themselves, but it really sucks hearing him scream most of the day.

Is he breastfed or formula fed? Breastfed babies don't poop as often, my daughter settled down after the first 2 weeks or so to pooping every four or five days, with plenty of pee diapers daily. She would start to get agitated the day of the poop episode but was happy enough to be wrapped up in a baby burrito with her legs froggied into her tummy for the pressure. If we didn't swaddle her, we would lay her on something and gently but firmly press her knees into her belly. I know some peds will say to give diluted prune juice but ours wasn't one of them.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Bad Munki posted:

I don't think anyone's snickering. Anyhow, I'm sure people have been arrested for such things, but I would say it happens 100% of the time due to gross negligence, people going above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to being dumb as poo poo. Locking a kid in a cabinet or unplugging the phone and heading out on the town to get drunk or whatever. People also get arrested and charged with neglect when they keep their kids in their home, too.

You also keep assuming a babysitter was an option (it wasn't) and that having someone sitting there in the room was reasonable (trust me: with her, it's not.) So I guess sit in the hallway outside the room? :)

I think the key would be what constitutes "leaving a child alone." Similarly, many cities have leash laws for dogs, but you don't actually have to have your dog literally leashed as long as you can reasonably exert control via, say, spoken commands. I would argue that my child wasn't left unattended any more than she is right now, upstairs in her crib. For the sake of argument, I suppose it bears pointing out that the room was a less than 100' walk away. If the room was on the 15th floor or something, that's an entirely different situation, obviously.

Stop posting. Just stop. However you want to justify what lovely choices you make don't go around sharing them like they're some amazing parenting fact where other people might try it with terrible results.

quote:

Question - how many of you ladies actually went into labor between 40 and 41 weeks? I have a baby shower planned for 40 weeks 4 days and I'm just curious the chances of me going into labor near/on that day.

I went 40 weeks 3 days. I probably would have gone longer had I not taken a 5km hike the day before I had her to get things kick started though because I never had anything happen till after that.

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Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Acrolos posted:

For those that have already had their babies, what are the thoughts on diaper pails? I have seen mixed thoughts on them...

The arm and hammer model tends to have the best reviews, but it only holds 25 at a time, compared to a much larger amount (at least I think) on the diaper genie.

I've also seen a fair number of people who suggest not bothering with them at all.


If you have the money to spend on them and refills or whatever go for it. We never used the one we received and put in her room since we had her stay in our room and did most of the changing on our bed or dresser so we gave it away. Same with our changing table. We just ended up putting the disposables we used in a biodegradable bag and tossing them in the kitchen garbage or straight into the garbage outside if they were really gross and rancid when she started solids.
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Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Dandy Shrew posted:

Congratulations! She's absolutely gorgeous :) So many goon babies this week, oh my goodness.


I'll be 36 weeks on monday and I haven't had ANYONE look at my ladybits at all since a routine pap I had last April. Is that normal? All my appointments have just been bp check, pee check, weight check, fetal heart. I had 2 ultrasounds, one at 20 weeks and one at 32 weeks.. I wonder if someone's going to suddenly decide to have a look up ol' cervix lane at my appointment on friday

I had one at 37 weeks and one at 40. My midwife offered to check it for me, along with giving me the info that it doesn't necessarily mean anything if my cervix is open yet or not. I opted to go for it, she used her hands. At 37 I was between 1 and 2 cm dilated but baby wasn't down into my pelvis enough to feel yet. At 40 weeks it was 3 cm and she could feel my daughters head and a bit of hair =3. I went into labour naturally 3 days later and had her at home.

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Bubble Babble posted:

Got a call from the midwife yesterday about this suggesting we indeed change the due date because of the size discrepancy. The problem is that I tracked my periods, sex, BBT, and peed on the ovulation sticks, AND my husband traveled the week after I ovulated, so we know exactly when we conceived. I told her my youngest brother was nine pounds, five ounces, and she seemed to reconsider, but I got a lot of questions of how regular my periods were and such. It was a little stressful. So we've kept the same due date in the end, but all the midwives seem a bit concerned about it.

Could this make it more likely I'd have GD? That wouldn't be a huge deal for me (I'm a pretty healthy eater), but I'm feeling anxious about this - because everyone else seems to be. Could they just not be used to people who track to conceive and huge viking babies?


From like 16 weeks to about 34 I measure ahead, at one point it was 8 weeks ahead. Nothing happened, I didn't get GD and when she was born she surprised everyone by only being 7 pounds when they thought she would be 9-10. She always stuck her butt out though and put her feet in my spine or the back of my ribcage and that's what made me bigger. Also, if it's not baby sitting weird, other things can affect the measurement, plus sized ladies usually measure ahead because of extra padding etc. Take the GD fasting test if you and everyone else is worried about it and go from there.

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Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


My daughter turns 3 on October 13th. 95% of the time one of us lies down with her and cuddles/talks/sings to her till she falls asleep. If she is tired enough or if we are busy, sometimes she will put herself to bed but that is rare though it is becoming more frequent. We have limited how long we stay with her, if it takes longer then 20 minutes we'll get up and leave her room, usually she will continue to play for a while before asking to go to bed again. Neither I nor my SO have it in us to be so cruel as to allow our child cry herself to sleep when it takes so little to make her go to sleep willingly.

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