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Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Janelle posted:

Question for breastfeeding moms: I just had my baby 9 days ago. The lactation consultant told me to not start pumping until 2 weeks in. When I do, what is the best way to build a stock pile of frozen milk without hurting the supply and what he is getting? Thanks in advance!

Can I ask why you aren't supposed to pump until 2 weeks in?

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Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

When I was trying to get pregnant, I though that I was going to ignore most of the dietary restrictions. Then I managed to get food poisoning the day I found out I was pregnant. I'm not 100% sure which of the ingredients did it, but the only thing I ate the day before I got sick was a sandwich with lunchmeat and brie. After being ill for 5-6 days, I have a new respect for food safety.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

I have a tooth filling that has gotten really, really sensitive out of the blue. I've never had a problem with it, but now anything that I drink hurts when it touches that tooth. Is this one of those weird pregnancy things, or do I need to go see my dentist? I don't want to go to the dentist unnecessarily (because I'm a giant baby who hates the dentist).

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

The Capitulator posted:

Hello everyone. My wife is about 9 weeks pregnant and we are deciding on whether to take the Nuchal scan. One of us is of the opinion that its a waste of time / money as it is not 100% certain and that regardless of the outcome, no abortion will be made. So basically, it will either be a-ok or it will just screw with our heads as we anxiously wait for the d-day. The other, well, is on the fence right now - mainly due to the fact that she is 31, not exactly old but definitely not in the 'safest' category either, 1:457 starting chance (as opposed to say 1:898 for a 20 year old), at least the according to this website. Help goons, what have you done / are going to do?

I'm also 9 weeks (32 years old, will probably be 33 by the time I deliver) and I'm scheduled for my nuchal translucency in 3 weeks. My understanding is that it will give you a more accurate risk range than just your age alone. The risk range allows you to decide if you want to go on to have more accurate but more invasive testing done.

If you feel that the risk range is uncomfortably high, you don't just go have an abortion based on the nuchal translucency alone. You'd usually then go on to get either a Chorionic Villus Sampling or an Amniocentesis, both of which will give a much more accurate picture of your risk. My doctor told me that his older patients (over 40) usually skip all of the early/non-invasive testing and go straight for either the CVS or Amnio, since they know their risk is already very high due to their age.


bamzilla posted:

I thought most of the issues arise closer/past the age of 35? I had my daughter a little over a month shy of my 30th birthday and it just wasn't something I bothered stressing out about before or after the results. Are there new numbers out there now?

The numbers I've always seen were from the March of Dimes (don't know where they get their numbers), but I haven't seen a change in them in at least 5 years. Here's what they say:

At age 25, the risk of having a baby with Down syndrome is 1 in 1,250.
At age 30, the risk is 1 in 1,000.
At age 35, the risk is 1 in 400.
At age 40, the risk is 1 in 100.
At age 45, the risk is 1 in 30.


EDIT: Obviously, the risk continues to go up each year, and the real risk varies from woman to woman and from pregnancy to pregnancy. A lot of people are fooled by charts like this and think that the risk at 34 and 1/2 is the same as the risk at 30, and that your uterus undergoes a magical change the day you turn 35.

I'm not majorly stressed out about my age or anything, but I'm signing up for any and all testing that's minimally invasive. I admit it's only partially for peace of mind. The other half is that I find all of the science and technology involved in all of this to be fascinating, and I want to experience it firsthand. I mean, they can take a fetus that's 11 weeks and less than 2 inches long, measure the thickness of the skin on it's neck and figure out if you have a risk of Down's based on that. That's loving amazing to me.
Also, I watched this video of someone getting it done, and was pretty blown away:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDRGt0ecti8

Mnemosyne fucked around with this message at 21:49 on Nov 24, 2011

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

legbeard posted:

Are any of you planning on banking your child's cord blood?

I was looking into it, but it looks pretty expensive. And the list of diseases that it could help with is kinda short.

What did you all make of it?

My OB gave me a fairly lengthy discussion about it and what it came down to was pretty much "if you have that kind of money to toss around that you won't miss, then go ahead, otherwise, don't bother." He said that it's not only the list of things that it can be used to treat that's short, but he actually asked them to see how many children had been treated via banked cord blood and he told me that the list was less than one side of a sheet of paper. And that included all of the kids that were treated, but the treatment was unsuccessful.

His bottom line was "I looked at that sheet and thought about how hundreds more children than that die in car accidents every year. If you want to spend that money on protecting your child's life, use it to get a safer car seat or a car with extra air bags." EDIT: This is why I <3 my OB/GYN. He's a no-nonsense kind of guy.

The other thing that he didn't mention, but that I looked into later was that it seems that if you DID have a kid with an illness that could be treated by the cord blood, you could technically get pregnant again on purpose and use the second child's cord blood to treat the first child. Of course then you end up with another child that you may or may not have planned on having. Apparently people do it.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Ana Lucia Cortez posted:

So my daughter's due to be born in three weeks. We've picked a name (Vesper) and I'm getting seriously annoyed with people's reactions. My husband and I think it's a cute, unique name but NO ONE likes it, and my mom (who is notorious for guilt-tripping and acting like I'm attacking her as a person if I make a decision she doesn't like) has been trying to convince me that it's a horrible, awful name better suited to a boy and our daughter will be ridiculed mercilessly in school.

Seriously? Vesper? Is it really all that bad?

My best friend said that this is the name she'd use if she had a girl (though at 32 she and her husband plan not to have kids). Her choice was mostly based around the fact that we were big fans of the Vesper Holly books as kids. This probably biases me, but I think it's a great name, which I would use myself if I didn't have several names that were higher up on the list. Maybe show your mom the books to show her it's kind of a "real name?" They are/were extremely popular books.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Ana Lucia Cortez posted:


I'm wishing now that we hadn't told anyone, but whatever, screw them.

My husband and I decided on names while we were still trying to get pregnant, and we also decided to keep the names a secret. Mostly because the first names are family names from his side of the family and I want to surprise his family with them.

When I did get pregnant, it was actually a month after we had decided to stop trying, so I was really in shock over finding out I was pregnant, and my husband was on the other side of the country for a work thing, and in a moment of serious weakness, I told my aunt the names I had picked when I called to tell her I was pregnant (relevant side note, I don't have parents or grandparents, so my aunt is basically my only family member, except my half brother and my aunt's kids.)

Her response to the girl's name was a sharp intake of breath, followed by "That's terrible! You can't do that to a child!" and her response to the boy name was "I don't know, doesn't that sound like a sissy British boy who wets his breeches?" And though I love really unusual names, my husband disapproves, so both of the names are very traditional and old-fashioned names (some of the few old-fashioned/traditional names that haven't made a huge comeback). I wasn't really expecting such a backlash over such traditional names.

And now she's constantly hounding me to name my child (if it's a girl) "India, China, Asia, Ireland, or Indiana." WTF aunt. :psyduck: I've still kept it a secret from his family, but I really, really wish I had stuck to my guns about not telling people.

Though one friend did give me a very diplomatic "That's so different than what I would have expected!"

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

OneSizeFitsAll posted:

Here's a subject which may be a little emotionally charged, but one I've been pondering a lot today. What are people's rules regarding smokers holding their newborns? Our midwife told us to make them wear an extra layer when they go out to smoke which they remove when they come in and to then wash their hands.

From some of the reading I've been doing regarding recent studies on third-hand smoke I'm wondering if this is enough. It seems the residue can get in skin and hair, and be sweated out as well as transferred through breath. Furthermore it seems that it can remain in these places a long time. I only have two smoking family members (aunt and brother) and I'm tempted to tell them not to smoke at all that day before holding my daughter, and if they do to shower and change their clothes completely. I know that this may well seem new parent OTT behaviour, though. I've seen arguments that the pollution in the air in cities is probably worse, and it's difficult to determine where a fair line should be drawn between reasonable requests and being a bit of a nazi, though I'm happy to assert any rules if I truly feel they will make an appreciable difference to any health risks to my daughter.

If this has been discussed ad nauseam then apologies.

Late reply, sorry. I personally think most of this is going way overboard. My husband and I are non-smokers, but his father and stepmother are crazy chain smokers. My husband and I are slightly older than the average age here (I'm 32 and he's 37), so when we were kids, it was kind of a given that everybody smoked. And they smoked everywhere, all the time. My husband spend his childhood inhaling his dad's cigarette smoke pretty directly (his dad smokes in the house and in the car) from the day he was born and he's perfectly normal with no respiratory issues, no asthma, no allergies even.

My mother literally smoked the entire time she was pregnant with me and my brother, and then I was raised by my grandparents where I too was sucking down my grandfather's smoke on a daily basis from birth onwards. The smoking made me a smaller baby, but other than that, I don't think there was too much damage done by it. I do have allergies and mild asthma, but both of my half-sisters and some of my first cousins also have it (and worse than I do), and they were born after everybody in the family gave up cigarettes, so I think it's a genetic thing and not an environmental thing.

Of course, I don't advocate smoking while pregnant, or even smoking in the same house/car with a baby, and I'm not going to allow my in-laws to smoke around any kids I have. But having come from a childhood where everyone was inhaling secondhand smoke almost every minute of their day, I think concerns about "thirdhand smoke" are a little overblown. Of course, you have to make your own decisions, but I don't really feel like having smoke residue on clothes is any real kind of risk.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

All this talk of gestational diabetes reminded me that last time I checked, they don't test for it until sometime like week 22? Anyone know why they wait so long to check? Does it not usually develop prior to that?

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Chicken McNobody posted:

Am I nuts to think that I'd rather have a C-section than be induced? I don't know that I've ever heard an inducement story that didn't involve hours of agony and rather than go through all that (and probably give out and have a section anyway) I'd rather just schedule the section.

I feel the same way and I thought it was probably crazy too. Something about the whole Pitocin idea just doesn't sit right with me. My choices at this point are down to either letting nature take it's course, or scheduling a C-section, with basically nothing in between. Of course, the hospital I'm going to deliver at has the highest C-section rate around here (between 45% and 70%, depending on whose numbers you're using), so delivering there is almost tantamount to choosing a C-section in the first place. A huge number of those C-sections are women who were induced and "failed to progress," so they moved on to C-section.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

bamzilla posted:

Why do you have doubts with pitocin, but are seemingly much more ok with being drugged to sleep and put through major abdominal surgery? That doesn't make sense to me.

I know of very few women (actually I only know of myself, but people here have known others) who were induced successfully. I would prefer to not be induced at all. Like I said, I was lucky that I was already in pretty active labor when I had to be induced. Having minor surgery for a cyst removal when my daughter was 3 months old was bad enough. I don't know how I would have been able to handle a c-section and taking care of a newborn. Lots of women do it, sure, but if given the option I wouldn't immediately just jump to "ok, let's schedule a c-section!".

I don't know, like I said, I know it sounds crazy. I think part of it is due to basically every story I've heard or read about women being induced at that hospital involves long, unproductive labor and an eventual C-section anyway, so if you're going to be induced, you might as well skip the 12-24 hours of misery. And with a C-section rate over 50%, I know that if anything goes slightly out of the ordinary, induced or not, they just decide you're getting a C-section. Which goes back to "might as well save myself the suffering in the beginning if that's where I'm going to end up anyway."

Part of the reason the Pitocin business freaks me out is that I very frequently have weird or adverse reactions to medications. And it's not that I'm some kind of hippies that things that herbal remedies will cure all our ills, because I frequently have bad reactions to those too. Obviously there's anesthesia involved with a C-section, but I've been under anesthesia multiple times and I know I don't have any post-operative nausea/vomiting or any other strange reactions to that, whereas the Pitocin is a big unknown.

And then from a much more personal standpoint, I have a history of being...combative with doctors. I don't mean to be, I'm not a rude, loud or combative person otherwise, I'm just very fearful about medical things and strangers touching me. I try to keep it in check, and I've even gotten therapy and hypnosis for it, but that only goes so far. And the problem is that the panic kicks in and I tend to reflexively lash out without making any sort of conscious choice to do it. I have hit and kicked doctors in the past, so I'm considering that it might be safer for everyone if they just knock me out. (Also relevant is that I've been with my current OB for over 12 years, and he's aware of my difficult nature.)

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Bodnoirbabe posted:

It seems the major factor in your preference is pain. You feel Pitocin is more painful because it's not a guarantee the baby will be out in a set time and lead to a c-section anyhow. I've heard tons of stories where Pitocin will ramp up the pain scale something fierce, but here's my question to you:

If you're worried about pain, why don't you consider an epidural to manage it rather than full on surgery?

It's not really the pain so much as it is the pain for no reason. To greatly simplify the situation, the crappy part of doing things vaginally is the long labor and pain, the crappy part of the C-section is recovering afterwards. I'm more concerned that being induced leads to getting BOTH the crappy labor part AND the crappy post-C-section part. I know if that happened to me, I'd be pretty mad (and I'd have probably lost my confidence in the doctors by the time that they decided that the induction hadn't worked).

I'm going to discuss all the options with my doctor, but haven't had a chance for in-depth discussions yet, since I'm only 13 weeks tomorrow. I honestly don't know if an epidural is going to be an option for me. I had to go in for an emergency D&C a few years back (long story but I had an unwanted pregnancy and got RU486 from a clinic which caused an incomplete miscarriage where I almost bled to death), and the hospital tried to give me an epidural for that but couldn't manage it. They had a bunch of people holding me down while I was flipping out, but they said they were concerned that if I couldn't hold still, that they could end up hitting my spine and paralyzing me. So they ended up giving me general anesthesia. It's pretty embarrassing, but I'm like a wild animal caught in a trap when it comes to medical stuff, even stuff that doesn't really hurt. I had to have a skin biopsy once, so my husband came with me to hold my arms and try to keep me calm, and I ended up biting him. Yeah, I bit my own husband. Not proud.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

hepscat posted:

You have time, I'd seriously discuss your aversion to medical procedures with your OB and possibly seek therapy for this specific event, or hypnosis, something. That sounds pretty severe.

I did already post that I've had years of therapy and hypnosis for this. This is about as good as it gets. Usually some Xanax helps, but obviously that's not going to happen when I'm pregnant.

EDIT: Previously it was bad enough that I would avoid getting medical treatment or going to the doctor. So really, this is progress.
EDIT2: This is also representative of times when things went really poorly. Nowadays I can sometimes even get blood drawn without incident, but it depends on a lot of things, like how informed I was ahead of time of exactly what was going to happen and how mentally prepared I was for it. It is pretty ridiculous how proud of myself I've gotten over getting my blood drawn without my husband there to help calm me down.

zombie duck v2.0 posted:

Mnemosyne, I'm going to go ahead and say it. The pain IS for a reason - your baby. I'm kind of saddened that I would have to point that out to you.
Yes, it's for a reason IF it leads to a successful delivery. If it just leads to you having a C-section anyway, then it was kind of pointless.

Mnemosyne fucked around with this message at 03:23 on Dec 21, 2011

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

hepscat posted:

Yeah Mnemosyne, I did read that but I meant specifically about childbirth. I had a longer post but I didn't want to go on excessively about it and increase anyone's anxiety. Nowadays, unless you are having a homebirth, you will probably be in a hospital, and the process of having a baby is long and you're going to be surrounded by multiple nurses and doctors. Again, not trying to make you unnecessarily anxious, but I would compare getting blood drawn on par with walking around the block for exercise whereas giving birth is more like running a 5K in a best-case scenario, and a full marathon if there are any complications.

Maybe a homebirth is right for you, I don't know. In that case, it won't happen unless you arrange it. You might find a birthing center and be seen by midwives instead of an OB. You have time to look into your options, that's what I was trying to point out.

And you'll be fine - after all, it's only one day in the life of you and your baby. The important point is to get through it and onto the childrearing.


Honestly, this is something that I was really thinking about. I have a specific psychologist that did the hypnosis, and though I don't see him anymore, I was wondering if maybe my husband and I could come in together so that he could possibly teach my husband some hypnosis tricks to use on me for this situation. I know it's not his usual thing, but it can't hurt.

I did also get some Hypnobabies to try out, but haven't listened to it yet.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

me your dad posted:

No the baby is totally healthy. It's just been drilled into our heads that if we step outside and this baby catches any kind of illness, it'll mean an instant trip to the ER for spinal taps and all other sorts of awful poo poo. We're afraid to visit friends and afraid to go to the store.

It's funny too that you mention Target because our doctor today said we should avoid places like Target where tons of people are. My wife wants to go to a local baby clothes store and we were talking about how she could run in and I would wait in the car with the baby.

Do either of your parents or close family live within driving distance? You can go visit a family member, which limits the amount of germ exposure since you're at someone's house with just a few people present rather than having to worry about the germs that 5,000 people have just left all over the mall/Target.
As an added bonus, if you go to family member's houses, they will probably offer to do a few baby tasks for your while you're there (holding, feeding, maybe even a diaper change if they're really generous) which can give you just a couple of minutes of baby-free time to catch your breath.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

You may also be offered an optional ultrasound + extra blood tests to check for Downs Syndrome risk around 12 weeks, generally referred to as the Nuchal Translucency scan. I think pretty much all doctors in the US (assuming you're in the US) give you the choice of doing this. Be aware that that because that one is considered optional, your insurance may not cover it.

But the root of your question is basically about if you would know if you miscarried, and yeah, you're not going to end up with an unnoticed miscarriage at 8 weeks or later.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

bamzilla posted:

12 weeks is too early for that particular test, I thought? I know someone who had one at around then and was told the fetus had some abnormalities and it turns out it was just too early for the test. I think the average timing is around 14-18 weeks with 13 being on the early side.

I just had mine done 1.5 weeks ago and they want to be as close to 12 weeks 0 days as possible. They'll do it as "early" as 11.5 weeks or as "late" as 13.5 weeks, but the window for the test seems to be really small.

Wikipedia gives this as a :science: answer: "The translucent area measured (the nuchal translucency) is only useful to measure between 11 and 14 weeks of gestation, when the fetal lymphatic system is developing and the peripheral resistance of the placenta is high. After 14 weeks the lymphatic system is likely to have developed sufficiently to drain away any excess fluid, and changes to the placental circulation will result in a drop in peripheral resistance. So after this time any abnormalities causing fluid accumulation may seem to correct themselves and can thus go undetected by nuchal scanning."

You could also be thinking of the "triple scan" (or "quad scan" depending on if you get 3 blood tests or 4), which is just a bunch of blood tests without ultrasound, but is done at roughly 15 weeks. There are soooo many tests available now, it gets kinda hard to keep track of what's what.

As a related side note, my Nuchal translucency test results just came back and my age + my scan + my bloodwork indicates a "less than 1 in 10,000" risk for Downs and "less than 1 in 6,400" risk for trisomy 18. Which are insanely good numbers. If you go based off of my age alone my Downs risk is between 1 in 500-750 and my overall risk of any kind of trisomy is like 1 in 300-400. And that 12 week ultrasound is just crazy stuff. I may have to pay for this out-of-pocket, but I think the extra test was worth it.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

bamzilla posted:

Yea, it's the quad screen I was thinking of, which I thought also includes the downs testing. I had mine done around 14 weeks the first time around and am not bothering this time around since I'm only 32.

The quad screen does include Downs testing, it's just a different type of Downs testing. I guess when you've got extra chromosomes it makes multiple different hormones measure differently than they should.

The triple/quad screen also tests for neural tube defects like spina bifida or anencephaly, which the Nuchal translucency test does not test for. I mean, I could see on my ultrasound that there is clearly a big, round, normally shaped head, so anencephaly is unlikely, but it doesn't tell me anything about spina bifida, so I'll still be getting the triple/quad screen.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

I was going to say the same thing about the doppler. I have one that I bought used off of Craigslist for $40, and they're only about $55 brand new (and you can always resell it on Craigslist when you're done with it). Mine is a "Sonoline B Fetal Doppler" with a 3Mhz probe, and I really like it.

I didn't get it due to nervousness, I actually only bought it to take to the families' houses for Christmas. I thought it would be a nice way to involve the grandparents. It turned out that my husband and I both enjoy it more than we anticipated, and we "check in" every night right before bed.

It can take a few tries to figure out how to find the heartbeat reliably, especially since it's easier to pick up the sound of your own swooshing through an artery in your abdomen. I hear that some people take their doppler in to a doctor's appointment and have the doctor show them how to use it, though I just watched some YouTube videos and experimented a bit. If anyone buys one, I can point you towards the videos that I found the most helpful.

EDIT: You also want to stay away from things like this:http://www.toysrus.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3977278&prodFindSrc=search
which is not a doppler, but more like a digitally amplified stethoscope. You won't hear anything prior to roughly 16 weeks with this kind of thing.

Mnemosyne fucked around with this message at 05:11 on Dec 28, 2011

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

I had no idea what this "ECV" thing you're all talking about was, so I googled it and then watched a video on YouTube. I'm now properly horrified.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AM6wDwTjmc
The happy piano music doesn't help.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Fire In The Disco posted:

Per the instructions from my OB, when I did a 24 hour collect last week I kept it on ice in a cooler, because they said keeping in in the fridge could cause food contamination.

Were they worried about the food contaminating the pee, or the pee contaminating the food?

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

I have no idea about the validity of this, but I was curious recently about why you couldn't start pumping breastmilk prior to giving birth (since some people start leaking ahead of time) and everything I saw said attempting to pump can send you into early labor. Seems a pretty harmless thing to try if you're trying to get labor started.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Anyone have any recommendations for or against any particular body pillows? I've always been a stomach sleeper, but in the past 2 weeks that's become impossible, and I'm having a hard time adjusting to side-sleeping.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

vanessa posted:

If I could go back in time, I would get one like this because I flip from one side to the other every couple of hours when I sleep.

That's a really, really good point. I flip back and forth too, and I wasn't even considering this one because it took up so much more room.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Bank posted:

So my wife is now three weeks pregnant and she's been getting some pretty bad hives. A small patch was on her lower stomach near her hip bone (an inch wide) and it's spread around her legs now. The dermatologist said it was eczema and gave her a cream, but it's not really working. She's had a lot of trouble sleeping and will wake up throughout the night because it's so itchy.

I've been with her 10+ years and have never seen her have hives like this before. Is there anything else she can do? I'm going to setup an appointment with another dermatologist to get a second opinion in the mean time. I just bought her some Eucerin lotion (with some kind of oatmeal additive) so hopefully that helps out.

She's been told to stay away from antihistamines (Loratadine specifically, so maybe Benedryl is ok?).

Loratadine is Category B, and my doctor told me to continue taking it during my pregnancy, so I don't know why your doctor said to avoid it. Unless they meant to avoid it in general for this rash.

Eczema is kind of weird in that their are a variety of subtypes all brought on by different things. One type is brought on by contact with an allergen, while other types can be triggered by stress or really dry skin. Depending on what the cause is, the treatments can vary. I get both allergen-related kind and the stress-triggered kind, and simply not getting enough sleep for a few nights in a row will cause me to have a rash all over both hands.

Personally, I have to really focus on making sure my skin stays moisturized, which means being really careful about not robbing the skin of moisture while washing the affected areas. Keep the water as cool as she's ok with (hot water dries skin out faster), don't use soaps that are either really drying or very scented. I try to use Cetaphil's cleanser whenever I'm having an outbreak. Similarly, moisturize the gently caress out of it as soon as you finish washing because your skin loses moisture really fast when you step out of the shower since you just washed all your protective oils off. I don't know about Eucerin because I don't use it, but it's the same as the soap, try to avoid lotions with a bunch of fragrances and stuff that will irritate already irritated skin. Cetaphil also makes some good fragrance-free lotions, and dermatologists seem to tell you to use all Cetaphil products as the first line of treatment for every skin problem.

Other than that, reduce stress and sleep more. I know that's much easier said than done, especially when you have an itchy rash, but eczema is basically a crazy immunological reaction happening on your skin, and stress and lack of sleep really kick your immune system's rear end.

EDIT: Now that I re-read, I see she's pretty much just gotten pregnant. Was she taking the prenatals that she's taking now before she found out she was pregnant? Seems like a long shot, but maybe she could be allergic to something in the vitamins if she just started taking them when she found out she was pregnant.

Mnemosyne fucked around with this message at 06:58 on Jan 11, 2012

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Chicken McNobody posted:

I formed babby!


Arthur Grayson S. was born on Wednesday afternoon. He was 9lbs, 8.9oz, 21 inches long, and had a 14-inch head :psyduck:

Love the name. Grayson would be on my list of boy names if my husband hadn't agreed to the very first name I suggested.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Chickalicious posted:

We have an oil-filled radiator type space heater. There are no exposed heating elements and it automatically shuts off if it tips. Ours has a digital readout that allows you to set it at a specific temp, instead of just vague low, medium and high settings. We turn the central heat off at night and turn on the space heater in our bedroom and keep the door shut. Everyone is warm and we're not heating an empty house all night.

I'd also recommend this type of heater. I was always nervous about the kind that blow hot air, but after I borrowed the oil radiator from a family member, I feel pretty safe with it. I also thought that it wouldn't put out nearly as much heat as the other kind, since there's nothing blowing the air around, but I've found it to be a lot more efficient than other heaters. Mine has a timer on it too, so I can set it to turn itself off after a few hours.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Is there some secret to keeping my maternity pants from falling down? They're fine if I stand still, but within 5 steps they've migrated downwards. I have two different pair (different brands) and both are doing the same thing. I've tried with the panel up and over my belly or folded down as an extra "belt" to hold the hip area up. Folding them over seems to work better than up-and-over the belly, but they're still driving me nuts.

EDIT: Google directed me towards these: http://www.amazon.com/Bellyups-Belly-Maternity-Suspenders-BLACK/dp/B0053EC7HC
but that looks pretty uncomfortable.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Why don't they redesign the damned things if this is a chronic problem that everyone has? I thought maybe I was just shaped funny.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Did you know that you can get some fairly hardcore Braxton-Hicks contractions as early as 18 weeks? I didn't, until today!

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Ben Davis posted:

How long after pregnancy does it take for eyesight to return to normal?

Haven't gone through it yet, but I've heard some women say that it will stay "abnormal" through the time you're breastfeeding too.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

b0g posted:

I'm curious.... have any of you used a zofran pump? My wife is on and I'm kind of paranoid its going to somehow hurt the baby. I read online that its a class b and somewhat safe but now I'm curious if any of guys used it.

I hadn't heard for a pump for Zofran before, but Zofran is given out in pill form by pretty much all OBs for even mild morning sickness. Everyone I know who has been pregnant in the past 3 years or so has gotten Zofran, myself included. Plenty of my friends used it every day, multiple times a day, and were fine.

I'm personally paranoid and chose not to take it, except two times when I hadn't eaten for a few days and I felt the risk of not eating for days was greater than the risk from the pill. For the record, all of my friends think I'm taking caution to the extreme.

It's one of those decisions where you can only go on the information that's available to you at the time, and right now the available information is "we don't think it's a problem." We all grew up drinking from plastic bottles with BPA in them and nowadays people act like one plastic container is going to kill your baby, but I think most of us have all our limbs and major organs. And our parents certainly can't and shouldn't beat themselves up over any risk that BPA may or may not pose because at the time, there was no indication that there was any risk whatsoever.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Chicken McNobody posted:

My baby has a Mongolian spot. I had no idea Caucasian babies could have them! For the first few days of his life I thought he had a bruise on his butt, and was ready to have words with the nursery staff. He's nearly a month old now and it hasn't faded and doesn't hurt, so it's just a regular old Mongolian blue spot. Anyway, as I researched it, I saw that apparently Mongolian spots can raise questions of abuse when someone that doesn't know what they are sees one, especially if your baby is light-skinned, so if your baby is born with one, you should have the nursery staff document that somewhere. Hopefully this one fades and people don't think I'm spanking my baby.

(Now I really want to have that genetic test done that traces your mitochondrial DNA around the world though. Obviously my son is the nth-great-grandson of Genghis :smugdog:)

When I went to the wikipedia article and saw that photo, I would have mistaken that for a bruise too. Or possibly that the kid sat in Kool-Aid.

I don't know if you're joking about the DNA test or not, but if you're actually interested, I can give you info about your options (it's a bit of a hobby of mine). But to get all technical on you, your son couldn't have mitochondrial DNA from Genghis because everyone, male or female inherits their mitochondrial DNA from their mother who gets it from her mother, etc. So a mitochondrial test will only reveal your mother's mother's mother's mother's... origins, and Genghis was a dude, so he never passed on his mitochondrial DNA. Never fear though, your son could still have Genghis's Y chromosome, or some of his autosomal DNA (the DNA that's on Chromosomes 1 though 22)!

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Chicken McNobody posted:

Now I feel dumb...genetics class wasn't that long ago. :( I really do want to have the correct tests done, though. I've hit a roadblock in my genealogical research because I have too many prostitute ancestors. :forkbomb: A general idea of where in the world my people are from is probably the best I can do!

Don't feel bad, understanding genetics is confusing. If you were really looking for a DNA test though, I didn't want you to buy a test that was mitochondrial DNA only and then be bummed when you got the results and discovered it was only part of what you were looking for. If you're looking to test, I would recommend 23andMe, though FamilyTreeDNA isn't bad either. Both do autosomal tests, so you get info on your mitochondrial DNA, your X chromosomes (or Y if you're a dude),and Chromosomes 1-22.

To keep this relevant to the pregnancy thread, I've tested both myself and my husband with 23andMe, though the original test that I bought for myself was a few years ago and had nothing to do with me getting pregnant. One thing I learned was that I'm a carrier for Hemochromatosis, and since it's more prevalent in people of "Celtic" descent, that meant it was more likely than average that my husband also carried it. So when I got pregnant, I tested him too, because I wanted to know if this baby was at risk for Hemochromatosis. Fortunately, it turned out he isn't a carrier, and also fortunately, I'm not a carrier for anything else. So we're good, but I enjoyed having the extra peace of mind (and now I have my husband's DNA to play around with).

So anyway, a useless but neat side benefit of having us both tested at 23andMe is that they have a little tool that lets you see the likelihood of certain traits in the offspring of any two people that have been tested. They test for way more than this, and things like the eyecolor here are an oversimplification of the genetics involved in eye color, but it's pretty cool to know at 5 months pregnant that your kid won't be lactose intolerant, and has a 72% chance of having light eyes.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

I had an amazing exchange with my mother-in-law yesterday. We went to Babies R Us to pick out a high chair, and we were testing out all the strap systems to see which ones were too hard to latch and unlatch easily.

Me: Wow, I can't believe how many straps and buckles there are on high chairs now. I bet all of these high chairs here have more robust restraint systems than the carseat you had for <my husband>.
M-i-L: Honey, I hate to break it to you, but I didn't have a carseat for <husband>.
Me: Uhhh...what did you do with the baby when you were driving and you didn't have a passenger to hold him for you? Did you just put the lap belt around him in the back seat...oh wait, most cars back then didn't have seatbelts on the back seats. What did you do?
M-i-L: You just laid the baby down on the back seat.
Me: But what about when you hit the brakes? Didn't that make the baby roll onto the floor?
M-i-L: Only sometimes!

Sadly that was not a joke on her part, though she realized how it sounds nowadays and laughed about it. For the record, my husband was born 1974.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

netally posted:

Ha, weirdly I had the same conversation with my MIL. She was going on about the good old days before people had travel systems and said "Oh we just used to lay him in his moses basket and put it on the back seat!" I asked if she used to strap it in or anything and she was like "No, I didn't need to do that. We drove slower back then." Mid-70s parenting was very chilled out!

On that topic, I really like this lady's blog: http://freerangekids.wordpress.com/ I'm trying to take the chill-the-gently caress-out approach to pregnancy/babies and a lot of her stuff is really reassuring.

Yeah, my MIL didn't even have a basket...just a baby on the backseat (and sometimes on the floor). Yet surprisingly, this same lady told me that I wasn't going to be able to let my baby lay/crawl on the floor of my house, because I have dog hair on my floor, and it's not safe.

I'm striving for laid back/chilled out and old-fashioned, and fortunately, my husband's natural inclination is the same as mine. My aunt on the other hand is constantly emailing me "DID YOU SEE THIS?" with links to stories about how apple juice is full of arsenic, so is organic baby food, and I should only eat full fat yogurt while pregnant because low-fat yogurt makes your baby have asthma 5 years later and ZOMG you don't need vaccines, you just need to take $10 of vitamins a day! I told her yesterday that I wasn't really paying attention to all that because if I did, neither I nor this baby would be allowed to eat anything. Crazy thing is she's a non-practicing RN, so she really should know better about a lot of the things she freaks out about.

Gonna check out that blog. Looks like my kind of thing.

EDIT: Thought I should also add that no matter how ridiculous I think everyone's advice is, I'm still really happy they're thinking about me and are interested in/excited about my pregnancy. I kinda don't have parents, and my grandparents are dead. I've been fairly blase most of my life about my lack of a mother, I'm feeling honestly bothered by it now, for pretty much the first time.

Sorry if that's kinda e/n, but seriously girls, appreciate your mother's concern, even if her advice is misguided.

Mnemosyne fucked around with this message at 22:44 on Feb 18, 2012

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

In your defense, pregnancy hormones making you crazy or not, the gender reveal ultrasound IS a big deal. I booked mine for the day I was 18 weeks, because I couldn't stand waiting any longer to know, and I was counting down the days. Everyone kept saying that they didn't get why I was so hung up needing to know right away, since neither I nor my husband had a preference when it came to gender, but drat it I needed to know RIGHT NOW.

It's kind of awesome that it turned out I'm having a boy, because I had already registered for stuff with dinosaurs, owls and monkeys on it, and everyone but me seems to think that girls can't wear that stuff. <:mad:>

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

We had what seems to be the same problem with names that most of you seem to have had; I wanted unusual and he wanted plain. The worst thing for me in our case though was that he didn't actually have any names that he actually liked, he just didn't like the ones I was picking. He would just randomly throw out names like Mary or Susan because they were the first things that came to his mind. When I asked him if he actually liked the name Mary, he would shrug and say "I dunno. I guess. It's better than what's on your list."

I told him to come back with a name that he actually liked and wasn't just suggesting because it was the first girl name he could think of, and the next day he came back with Kerrigan. As in the character from StarCraft. I told him we were not naming a child after a video game character, and he told me in all seriousness that there was no difference in naming a child after a StarCraft character vs naming them after a character from Shakespeare (I had Ophelia on my list).

If you're looking for more name inspiration, I would suggest digging into your (and his) family history a bit (make sure to find out people's middle names too). You'd be surprised at some of the unusual names people used back then, and having it be an old family name adds legitimacy to (and makes people less critical of) a name that they might otherwise accuse you of having made up, or they might think is "too weird." I'm having a boy, but I gave a lot of thought to using Esther for a girl since it goes back in my family tree to at least 1802 (though we aren't Jewish.) And it's old-fashioned but hasn't had a comeback in popularity. Both my husband and I have some totally wacky names in our histories though (Elthonia, Wrentha, Beulah, Brethard, etc).

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Stairs posted:

I did that with my first daughter's middle name. Her middle name is Desiree after my favorite teacher who died two days before I found out I was pregnant (I found out the day I called her to tell her the news.) This new baby will have the middle name "Sue" because both his and my mothers are named Sue.

As for using names in our family history, unfortunately it's all names like Verbena, Geneva, Ival, Estelle, and boring ones like Jean and Debbie.

It's not going to help you since you obviously don't like it, but I think Verbena is pretty awesome, but you don't want a kid ending up with the nicknames "Verb" or "Beany." I too like Estelle (though I like Estella more, but I like literary names). Ival is pretty weird though. I don't know how it's properly pronounced, but I bet a lot of people would pronounce it like "Evil."

For me, picking out names is pretty much the best part of pregnancy (me picking out names, not the part where I have to argue with the husband over them), and when goons actually have their babies, my favorite part of the announcement posts is seeing the names they chose. I don't know why I like names so much.

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Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Cathis posted:

On another note, I am seeing on multiple places I should add DHA pills to my morning routine. Does anyone have any suggestions for brands? I take NatureMade multi prenatal but I have like another 8 months of that supply left, so all I need is a DHA supplement I guess. Tried looking at the varieties on Amazon but I can't tell the difference except for cost. May Clinic book will be arriving Tuesday.

Consumer Reports did a study of fish oil supplements a few years back and rated the ones that were most pure/had the fewest contaminants, and had the lowest levels of mercury. Nordic Naturals is one brand that they rated highly, and it's what I usually buy since they have a variety of different formulas. I don't remember every brand that passed their tests, but I do know that Wegman's (which is a grocery store, if you have any in your area) house brand did really well too, and is much, much cheaper. Off the top of my head, I would assume that the NatureMade ones also passed because NatureMade always does well in those independent tests.

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