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yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Requesting to join as well, first name Paige.

(USER WAS PUT ON PROBATION FOR THIS POST)

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yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

I'm also due in November - Currently 11 weeks pregnant.

Is anybody else suffering from crippling morning (and afternoon, and evening) sickness, and found a magic cure? I'm hoping the magic week 12 that everyone keeps telling me about will mean the end of my nausea. I've tried all of the obvious things (ginger, tea, saltines, eating frequently) and have 2 prescriptions from the doc but it rarely works.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

legbeard posted:

I'm super tired after lunch these days. I can barely stay awake on the scissor lift. It's really annoying because this work is usually very enjoyable. WIll I stop getting so tired, or will it just get worse?

I was tired all day and needing tons of naps in my first trimester. Now in my second, I am alert and energetic throughout the day, but mornings are AWFUL for me - If I don't get at least 9-10 hours, I am a zombie for the first hour or two and it's a huge struggle getting out of bed. After that, though, I'm fine. If anything I would say I have slightly more energy now than I did before pregnancy.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Congratulations, legbeard! In your shoes I would be both terrified and excited. You will do great.

I have a question for those who have given birth in a hospital before. We have two hospitals to choose from, and yesterday we had our first tour at the bigger and more popular one (voted 'Best Hospital To Have A Baby' for 9 years in a row). We'll tour the other one in a few weeks. I liked a lot of what I saw about this hospital, they have good breastfeeding support, the delivery room is VERY nice (the postpartum room.. not so much), the nurses were friendly, etc. But one thing that really put me off was they were explaining the rooming-in procedure, saying that your baby could stay with you in the postpartum room for your whole stay, but she said they require all babies to go to the nursery from 6am-9am every morning so that the pediatricians can check them over.

Is that normal? It really put me off because I want to exclusively breastfeed, and if my baby is away from me for 3 hours, I can only assume they will be feeding him and I'm not okay with that. She also kept mentioning that the nurses would be "in and out of the room to feed and take care of the baby" during our stay. But.. I don't want them to feed the baby. I'm just worried that I will run into this at both hospitals and I don't want to feel like I'm fighting with the nurses to get them to leave my baby alone. I really appreciate having the help available if I'm tired and I need it, but I don't want to be sleeping and wake up to one of the nurses trying to give my baby a bottle, or taking him away for three hours in the morning.

Anyways, just curious about others experiences with this.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Panne posted:

I'd go to a mother-child friendly hospital if there are any (http://www.unicef.org/programme/breastfeeding/baby.htm)

Well, I can only choose between the two hospitals where my doctor has privileges. That's a pretty standard thing around here - Some OB/GYNs don't even give you an option, they deliver at one hospital and one hospital only.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Grayscale Rainbow posted:

TL;DR - I'm 20 weeks and still nauseous after having rather bad morning sickness. Can I expect to be nauseous throughout the rest of the pregnancy?

I'm 23 weeks, so only a few weeks ahead of you, but our stories sound similar. I had crippling nausea for the first 15-16 weeks, and Zofran did nothing for me, neither did Phenergan. I still vomit on occasion, but I've found the triggers (not getting enough sleep, not eating enough) so I can usually avoid it. But yeah, I am kind of accepting that I may be this way through the entire pregnancy. Which sucks because with all of my siblings and me, my mom stopped having nausea at 12 weeks. I seem to just be destined to puke.

enitsirk posted:

yawnie, it would suck if you LOVE your doctor but if you end up not being happy with either hospital, you can still swap doctors.

Thanks for the input!

I do kind of love my doctor, so I would probably deal with the three hour thing before switching doctors this late in the game. My guess is that if it came down to it (meaning if the 2nd hospital is lovely), I can call and talk them first hospital out of that. I imagine they want the business more than they want to argue with me about it, so hopefully I can just refuse and they'll get over it.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

bamzilla posted:

:mad: That was around 23 weeks though so maybe if your SO is further along the baby won't have as much room to wiggle around and cover their face.

A 3D at 23 weeks really isn't a good example of what you can get - 28-32 weeks is generally the recommended time frame to get the best pictures. Sometimes they will still end up looking like that, or baby will hide behind his placenta (my baby's favorite position), but often you can get some good face shots.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Lil Joeys are an AIO that have a snap-down for the cord stump.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

It's definitely possible to tell so early, if the ultrasound tech is skilled at being able to discern the "angle of the dangle" - Before the genitals are fully developed, girls can still have a nub that looks like a penis, but there are slight differences between a boy nub and a girl nub if you know what to look for. We were able to tell our baby boy's gender at 15 weeks. He was eager to show us. I have no less than 5 different crotch shots in my CD of pics from that ultrasound because every time the tech would move on and try to get some face shots, he'd flip around and say LOOK AT MY PENIS SOME MORE!!

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

HClChicken posted:

Wife is currently at 36 weeks. Swelling is getting pretty bad, she drinks at least 64 oz of water a day. She works on her feet 4-6 hours 4 times a week. She doesn't exercise at all, but she does elevate her feet and take lukewarm baths for the swelling. Plus I rub her feet as much as she wants.

What are other ways to reduce swelling/ prevent it?

If she hasn't already, cut out all caffeine and cut out as much salt as possible. When she sits, she should keep her legs softly bent or extended all the way rather than bending at a sharp angle, and definitely no crossing her legs. Wear shoes and clothing that aren't too constricting - The only exception is support hose which will be tight all over rather than just in certain spots. There have been times that even flip-flops were too constricting for my swollen feet and I had to kick them off for a break. She should take every opportunity to rest and put her feet up.

Otherwise it sounds like she's doing the right things, though even 4 times a week may be too much work for her body right now. If there's any way she can cut back or take early leave, this may be her body's way of telling her to do so.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

You may become less sensitive the farther you progress into your pregnancy - During the first and early second trimesters I was nauseous constantly and I ate the same things over and over because everything else grossed me out. Once I passed that phase, most of my favorites foods became interesting again, although there are certain foods which will still turn my stomach (red meat, mostly). That being said, during my aversion-to-everything phase, I ate a LOT of plain cubed or shredded chicken, and rice. Usually together. Turkey sandwiches were a big hit too (be sure to microwave any deli meats to protect against listeria), some fish, and most cheeses were still yummy to me. I could usually tolerate bagels or toast for breakfast. Add in things like nuts and dried fruit for snacks and you can scrape together a fairly decent variety of foods to get by until the aversions go away.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Dr. Octagon posted:

I have to say, all of the comments we've received when we mention cloth diapering ("oh, we'll see how long that lasts" and the like) only make us MORE determined to stick with it. I've also gotten comments from my husband's side of the family about how I shouldn't even try to breastfeed, and that our decision not to circumcise will "cause problems later." I just have to sit there with a forced smile on my face as I watch these people give their babies and toddlers sips of beer.

I hate this. I want to punch anyone who says this kind of crap to me. However, I'm still pregnant so I'm sure hormones have a lot to do with this dramatic reaction. I've taken to just not bringing it up, or if someone asks (or notices that I have cloth diapers on my registry), I just say "We'll be doing a mix of cloth and disposable to save money and help the environment." That is USUALLY matter-of-fact enough to keep the comments at bay, but there's always the occasional jerk who wants to shoot down our ideas.

I've had the same issues with being really overwhelmed with all of the options, so I just registered for several different types of diapers - All in ones, prefolds, covers, disposables, a sprayer, extra liners, etc. I figure the only way I will know which kind of prefer is to try them all. We do plan on using a mix to start out with, and then as we figure out what works best for us, we'll stock up more on that particular type.

Lazaruise posted:

So.. what can I expect during the pregnancy that I should prepare for?

Like everyone else has said, just be as supportive as you can. She's going to be feeling her entire body change very suddenly, and she can't even cope with changes the way she normally would because her hormones will be changing her emotional responses and she may not even be aware of it. It goes a long way just to be sympathetic to those changes and tell her you know it's hard and that you're there for her. Be involved. Offer foot rubs. Don't be upset if she needs you to get her a watermelon at 3am. Offer to help out around the house more. Tell her she looks beautiful often, because she's going to feel fat and frumpy.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Banana Cat posted:

I just hit my third trimester and even with baby stuff beginning to fill our bedroom and feeling my cervix get pummeled every day from the inside, I can't seem to wrap my head around the fact that I'll be holding a baby before Christmas. Does it ever really sink in? And can I do anything about the cervix pummeling or do I just have to deal until she's born?

Not sure if it would work the same for cervix pummeling, but when baby kicks/jams a butt into my ribs, I apply firm and steady pressure downward on that part of my belly to encourage him to GTFO of that spot. It usually works, though as soon as I remove the pressure he goes right back to where he was. Sigh.

I don't really get all the Facebook hate. If someone annoys me on my feed, I hide their posts. I also post whatever the gently caress I want to my own wall, assuming others will hide me if I annoy them, because it's my page and if I want to say my kid is the poo poo or I love my husband, then I'm going to. I also think my identity is comprised of slightly more than what's on my Facebook profile picture, so I don't think I'd have any qualms about setting the picture as my kid for a while. I guess we'll see how it goes after I pop this baby out. So far I've never had the urge to set my picture as one of my ultrasounds, even though I've gotten some kick rear end 3D pics of him, but if I decide one day that I want to, I guess I feel like it's my page and people can get over it.

As far as people's annoying advice and comments, I've recently learned that once you hit the later stages of pregnancy you're basically not allowed to feel tired or uncomfortable because it's going to get SO MUCH WORSE right before the baby comes. While I know that's true for most people, and I do dread weeks 36-40, I'm still loving tired and uncomfortable RIGHT NOW. But dare I even hint at feeling this way, and I get FLOODED with "Oh honey child wait til you hit the end and you'll literally do anything to get that baby out of you!!!!!". I wish I knew what it was about pregnancy that brings out the most condescending and offensive sides of everyone around you. So far I haven't come up with any good passive-aggressive retorts, suggestions are welcome. :rolleyes:

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

MoCookies posted:

I can't get over how hard I'm getting kicked lately. I'm ~31 weeks, and the hard kicking and punching lasts for hours and hours every day, starting around 4 am. It's like I'm gestating the Mini-Hulk, and every Hulk-Smash to the cervix makes me want to cry. I can pretty much always tell you where he is (head up, down, transverse, etc.), and where his feet (and often his hands too) currently are. None of my pregnant friends seem to have the same level of hyper-awareness of their baby's movements and position. So now I'm wondering if I'm overly sensitive in my baby-making parts, if this level of activity is normal, and if I'm going to be able to go through with the natural birth I'm planning. I don't know what the gently caress, and I'm starting to freak out just a little.

You're not alone. I'm 32 weeks and I've felt like this kid was an abnormally violent kicker for the entire pregnancy. I felt his first movements at 15 weeks and by around 20 weeks, it was starting to get strong enough to keep me up at night. These days I honestly fear that he might break a rib. Some days it literally feels like he is trying to claw his way out of my cervix. I have about a gazillion friends that are also pregnant right now and they all look at me like I'm crazy when I describe how active he is - And I want to punch anybody who describes baby movements as feeling like "butterflies". It is nice to know whether he's head down or not (which he almost always is), but after a long day of violent kicks it can get pretty tiresome. I've always been very in-tune with my body too, so that may contribute to it. Anyways, all that is just to say that I feel your pain.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Gumby Orgy posted:

How bad does your morning sickness have to be before you get diagnosed with hyperemesis gravidarium? I'm so sick all the time I can't function or successfully perform the basic functions of my job. When I went to the ER, the doctor managed to both acknowledge the amount of vomiting I was having was excessive and treat me like it was all in my head.

I have phenergan suppositories but they knock me out. They help, but the nausea doesn't go away enough for me to function at a low level again. I don't know what to do. I feel like I'm crazy.

I really, really feel your pain - I had severe nausea and I vomited every day, sometimes multiple times, all throughout the first trimester and part of the second. Everyone told me "Oh it will clear up as soon as you hit 12 weeks!". They were wrong. It DID eventually start to ease up, but it was very very slow progress, and I don't think I felt actually semi normal again until my early 20 weeks. Phenergan and Zofran did very little for me. I had some success with taking Unisom & B6, usually before bed, but obviously check with your doctor on that first. People would try to suggest things like ginger and peppermint and I would just laugh - It was so far beyond that for me.

Anyways, I'm not trying to paint a horrible picture for you although it probably sounds like it - Just know you're not alone and it WILL get better. Hopefully it will improve faster for you than it did for me, I was a rare case. My doctor really couldn't do anything else after trying all the different meds, other than to offer me a home nurse to give me IV drugs if I was unable to hold down any food at all. Thankfully I never had to resort to that.

Definitely try to get the Zofran, just tell your doc Phenergan isn't doing the trick and you need something else. Almost everyone I know found some relief with Zofran when nothing else would work.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Did somebody say colostrum? I'm actually glad you brought it up, since everyone else I ask looks at me weird and said "no... that never happened to me." I think it started around the same time as you, 25 weeks or so, and has kept up pretty consistently since then. Sometimes I'll go days with nothing, and then bam, I look down and my shirt is wet. It got very frustrating having to change shirts all the time so I pretty much just wear nursing pads all the time now. I used to have pierced nipples and I've been wondering if that might be contributing to the large amounts of leakage? But I have heard that it's perfectly normal to leak at least a little bit, so who knows.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

limegrnxj posted:

Enjoy it. Based on our lack of sex over the last several months and the failure of an attempt made this morning, I'm pretty sure my husband finds me repulsive.

Yeah this. Our last attempt was so incredibly awkward with my 9 month pregnant belly and wrecked pelvis ruling out 99% of positions - It was at least five minutes of "you go this way. now I'll go this way-no, ow, go back-wait, try this-gently caress!" before the sexing could even begin.

Seconding the Old Navy suggestion for maternity coats - I don't think they have anything super heavy, but I did get a lightweight maternity coat from them that I love and wear with everything.

Edit to respond to this:

Doom Catcher posted:

In other news, after the past month of bitching to myself I finally admitted to my midwife how much effin pain I am in and she talks to me about Symphysis Pubic Dysfunction. So yeah... Off to find a belly band of some kind. Anyone have a favorite for dealing with this ridiculous level of pain and inability to walk?

I actually went to the hospital for this recently, after I burst into tears trying to get out of the car and it freaked my poor husband out. My pelvis feels literally split in half - It is some of the worst pain I've ever felt. Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be much you can do about it other than the support belts, which I hate to say, I haven't found very helpful. When it was a milder case, I found relief with warm baths and limiting my activity, but as it got more severe nothing really worked. I've heard that it's good to try to keep your knees together when you change position in bed or get up and down from the couch and stuff, as anything that separates your knees will put extra pressure on your pelvic joints. Also doing light pelvic exercises can help tone everything up and give you a bit more stability. I just toned my activity waaayyyy down and spent several days being a bit of a couch potato because it hurt too much to do anything else. Eventually it did start to ease up, slightly, and now I can manage to walk around and do light housework without the excruciating pain I was experiencing. Sorry dude :( I know how badly it sucks.

yawnie fucked around with this message at 19:20 on Oct 17, 2011

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

I'm 38 weeks, so at the height of the pregnancy suckage, and I still don't hate it. I've had just about everything you could imagine go wrong during it, and I've hated how I felt at times, but I really can't say I've ever hated being pregnant - It's just too awesome, to me, the feeling that I've grown a little person, and he can even respond to outside stimulation and stuff. Seeing how my body has changed, however unattractive and gross at times, is also pretty loving cool. I would enjoy a book that talks about the things no one really tells you about (pregnancy induced carpal tunnel, anyone?), but not if it was from the standpoint of "you're going to hate pregnancy because it's awful".

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

I have a pregnancy pillow very similar to the one in the picture and I'm not sure I could sleep without it. I turn from side to side all night, so having a long pillow on both sides of me offers great back support and makes it easier to turn over without having to take the pillow to the other side with me, especially now with the pelvis issues making it even harder to move from side to side. I can also use it to elevate one or both legs in a semi side lying position or support my belly with it. For a little while I also used a wedge pillow for the belly but now I'm enormous enough to just fit my belly on the pregnancy pillow. I did try swapping the whole thing out for a regular body pillow because it does take up a ton of room in the bed and as another poster said, the pillowcase does pill up a lot, but I barely slept at all with just the body pillow so I switched back. But yeah, I think it would be hard to fit that thing on anything except a king sized bed.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

I'm so sorry JBark. Just.. wow :(

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Just FYI, with most doctors, breaking your water is the start of a 24 hour clock that ends in c-section if you haven't delivered by then, because of the increased risk of infection. I believe most of the time they will break your water as a type of labor augmentation only after an active labor pattern has been established with other induction methods first, rather than doing it as the first step. If that is truly their plan, you might want to ask about a Cervidil or Cytotec insert instead, usually induction will start there and then move to pitocin after that.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

I haven't gone crazy with the food restrictions this pregnancy, but I also realize I'm making choices for a completely helpless child that has no choice but to live inside me for 9 months and deal with the consequences of my decisions, so I'm not going to be all "lol gently caress dat i wanna be stress free". It literally takes an extra 20 seconds to microwave my deli meat before I eat it, and I enjoy california rolls just as much as sashimi, so I can easily make that "sacrifice" for my unborn baby and not feel stressed about it. But I've also used my judgment plenty of times and if I felt confident about the source of my food, then I felt okay about bending the rules somewhat. I also relaxed a little more once I passed the first trimester and the miscarriage risk became substantially lower.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

I can't imagine why they would feel it necessary to give her the test unless her blood came back RH negative. I'm RH negative and I told them that upfront, which they confirmed by testing my blood, then they had my husband go and get tested at his GP so we would know whether or not I needed the Rhogam. Sure enough, he is RH positive, so they scheduled me for the shot. I felt the risks of not having it far outweighed the risks otherwise, especially after hearing the stories of what my mom went through with her pregnancies (she's RH negative and doctors didn't think to give her Rhogam shots until she'd had several complications), so it was a no-brainer for me. I would definitely talk to your wife's OB and find out what they know and why they are giving it to her - They should have explained it all to you by now including a pamphlet or some information on RH sensitivity. If they're actually trying to do it without knowing what her blood type is, then yeah, I'd raise hell.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Melraidin posted:

So my understanding is correct then? If I'm Rh- then there's no reason for her to have the shot?

Yes, that is correct. You are most likely going to be Rh+ as being Rh- is fairly rare in any race, but it would be nice to get checked, just to be certain your wife needs the shot. She is most likely going to have to get it again after she delivers, and again for every subsequent pregnancy, so knowing with 100% certainty that it's necessary when the test for you is relatively simple and cheap is worth it, IMO.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Chiming in to the November babies to announce that River Alexander arrived on 11/10/11 at 12:39am, weighing 9lbs 1oz and 20.5 inches long. I was a week overdue and my OB called to schedule an induction for me, and not 5 minutes after I hung up the phone, my water broke. Seems River wanted to come on his own terms. I had a 14 hour natural labor with no meds at all except for my IV fluids, so I'm really happy with how it all turned out - I went into it knowing you can't really plan a birth because it will go however it goes, but we ended up getting everything on our birth plan anyways. I ended up with 2nd degree tears and a fragmented placenta, but my OB handled both very efficiently so I was able to recover quickly.

We had some issues with breastfeeding starting out and he lost a bit of weight which freaked me out, but we eventually got the hang of it and now I'm just waiting for my nipples to heal so that initial latch isn't so painful. This may be crossing over into TMI territory, but whatever (excellent stalking material for my SASS santa!) - For those of you who had to have stitches, how long before you noticed things going back to normal in the vag region? My swelling has gone down almost completely, but I still experience a lot of irritation from the stitches. I'm wondering if that's fairly normal at this point or if maybe I should call my doc - I've never had stitches anywhere before, so I'm kind of clueless how long it takes for something like that to heal.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

tiananman posted:

I know it's probably been mentioned a thousand times, but definitely get in touch with your delivery center's lactation consultant, or any lactation consultant. My wife had extremely painful breastfeeding sessions and it was entirely due to her positioning. Our LC was a miracle worker. Even though our son was getting plenty of nutrition, it was unpleasant to feed him, and without the LC we probably wouldn't have stuck with breastfeeding. She actually said that breastfeeding those first few weeks was MORE painful than childbirth. Yeesh. She had an easy delivery but still.

I did meet with the lactation consultant twice in the hospital, the problem was more about him being lazy and latching really shallow, as well as one of my nipples being flat so for a few days he nursed exclusively from one side while I pumped from the other. The side he was exclusively nursing on took quite a beating and it's only just now getting a chance to heal now that he has figured out how to latch properly on both breasts. I have a number for another LC but I don't really want to spend her $150 fee when I feel like we've got it under control now, but I will definitely call her if I feel like we start to backtrack - Breastfeeding is a big goal so I want every chance of it working for us. I appreciate the advice, though I'm sorry your wife had such a rough time. It's frustrating that something so natural is so difficult to learn.

tiananman posted:

You're through the looking glass of TMI after childbirth as I'm sure you know. You can't go back...

Well yeah, but still, I don't assume the internet wants to hear about my vagina ;)

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

There are dozens of arguments on either side of epidural vs no epidural, so for me it wasn't "oh no the epidural is the devil and will kill my baby", it was honestly just a personal goal to have a natural birth - I wanted to see how my body handled labor with zero medications, which is why I tried to hold off on induction for as long as my OB would let me. I didn't pitch a fit when he wanted to schedule it, as I was already a week overdue and I trusted him, but it was a huge relief to go into labor naturally and then get to watch as my body handled childbirth magnificently and popped out a baby with no outside help. I also didn't like the idea of lots of medications, I barely even take Tylenol and I had never been admitted to the hospital or had an IV or anything, so I wanted to limit the amount of medical stuff that was done to me as much as possible. And being able to walk around, lean on my husband for support, rock in the rocking chair, etc. as well as being mobile directly after delivery were nice perks as well.

Here are a couple of pictures from our labor & delivery and a cute baby pic or two:











yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

My husband teared up several times during labor and birth, but as you can see from the picture, he actually got to deliver the baby so he was pretty preoccupied trying to not drop a 9lb slippery ball of wiggles so that may have accounted for the lack of serious waterworks :)

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

My sizing ultrasound at 39 weeks estimated him at 8lbs 3oz, two weeks later he came out 9lbs 1oz. So it was probably pretty accurate.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Once I hit 10cm, my nurse at the hospital wanted me to hold off on pushing and labor down for a while since the baby was still at -1 station, but within minutes I was begging to push. The urge was just incredible, so I was all "gently caress laboring down" to the nurse and she started teaching me how to push. I pushed MUCH more effectively when she was counting and using her fingers to show me where to direct the pressure, and I was at it for less than an hour and then bam, baby.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

netally posted:

The C section posts are making me pretty miserable, as I am tempted to plan for one myself.

I have severe SPD. I have trouble walking and can only open my legs a few inches before the pain sets in. Although SPD on it's own isn't a reason for a C section, I found out at the 28 week scan that my baby is in the 90th percentile for all measurements. It may be due to hypoglycemia, but my blood results were messed up and I'm having to wait for them to be redone or to be called in for another GTT. Plus all the babies in my family seem to have been giant 9lb+ monsters, so the chances of me having a large baby are high.

I normally hate "well I did x and was fine!" posts, but just in case it helps you feel less freaked about the whole thing, I had severe SPD as well and I birthed a 9+lber with no complications - My ultrasound at 39wks was measuring his head as being in like the 95th percentile and I was petrified. My SPD lasted about a week after the delivery and then went away completely.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

I've heard of the six week thing (or variations) and though it seems a little outdated or overcautious, I don't think it's completely insane to want to limit a newborn's exposure to large crowds of people. My pediatrician has erred on the side of caution, for example, when we asked about taking our week old baby to do the rounds at families houses on Thanksgiving - Based on his recommendation and our own sense of what was right, we just stayed home and had a handful of people come visit him. We've popped into Target or the book store or gone to visit family a few times, but my son is just now turning six weeks and we've spent the majority of our time inside. I don't think it's unreasonable to worry about a baby's health especially during cold/flu season.

That being said, I would much rather risk exposure than have a parent who's going absolutely stir-crazy or feeling like they can't cope with the solitude - So by all means, if it will help you to deal, GTFO of the house.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

There's a prescription medication now for upping milk supply, might be worth checking with your doctor about it if the other methods don't help enough.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Those of you who are worried in the early days can always try purchasing a hand-held fetal heart doppler to use at home between doctor visits. I picked up a HB at around 9 weeks and I checked it once a week for peace of mind, and it helped a lot. You can find them on eBay or Amazon. The downside is that not everyone can pick up the HB, especially if you have extra body fat or an anterior placenta, so you have to be prepared to possibly not find anything and not stress yourself out over it.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Sex was the only thing my doctor recommended we do starting at 37 weeks to help ripen my cervix and get things going. I was 2cm and 70% effaced by 40 weeks and went into labor on my own at 41 weeks, so maybe it worked. Or maybe my husband slipped my doctor a 20 to suggest it, who knows ;)

I've heard that castor oil is pretty dangerous, not only for you but for the baby (upping the chance of the baby passing meconium before delivery). I don't know how valid that is but either way, I was never willing to risk it.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Re: Braxton Hicks - I contracted for two weeks straight, every 5-10 minutes, until my water finally broke at 41 weeks and the contractions changed as soon as that happened. It did help to change positions, take a bath, etc. and yes drinking a lot of fluids can help if the level of oxytocin (the hormone which causes contractions) in her blood is really high, the fluids will "water it down" so to speak. It happens sometimes, it sucks, and I hope it gets better for her soon :(

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

vanessa posted:

If I could go back in time, I would get one like this because I flip from one side to the other every couple of hours when I sleep.

This is the one I have. When I had a big belly, I couldn't stay on one side for more than an hour or two without my legs getting tingly and uncomfortable, so this was a lifesaver for me. I literally couldn't have slept without it. I did hate all the extra bulk in the bed, so I tried to switch to a cheap body pillow for one night, but it wasn't the same and I got up in the middle of the night to retrieve the old one.

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

I would file a complaint against that triage nurse. That is absolutely terrible.

As far as taking stuff to the hospital, I found my Boppy useful, though when I got home I much preferred using the My Brest Friend until he was a little bigger. I was DYING to get a nice shower after delivery and took one the next morning, I also brought my most luxurious toiletries since I felt like if I ever deserved to feel pampered, this was the time. But the hospital did have most of what I needed in that area so it wasn't necessary. They also had everything the baby needed including little shirts, but you definitely need a going home outfit and warm blanket and like someone else said, possibly a pacifier for the ride home (it saved us!).

I pretty much over-packed because I wanted to be more than prepared, which was fine with me, but the one thing I wish I'd thought to bring was more bedding for my husband. All he had from the hospital a flat pillow on an uncomfortable, hard "couch" and a thin blanket. I did bring my huge birth ball and was very glad that I did (the hospital didn't have one).

yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

limegrnxj posted:

My own towel at the hospital would have been glorious! Live and learn.

Speaking of post natal bleeding, when did that stop for most folks? I'm at 4 weeks now and ready to be done, but it just keeps going.

Just shy of 8 weeks for me.. It stopped for a week, came back as very light flow/spotting for another week, the finally disappeared for good.

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yawnie
Jul 29, 2003
lollerz.

Oh it's totally normal. I've had different reactions to cervical checks, ranging from no spotting, to brown spotting, to light pink flow for about a day and a half. As long as it's not bright red or heavy and not for more than a day or two, you're good.

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