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Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Mr. Mambold posted:

On a King's warship, you wipe your rear end with a Mel Gibson if the captain says you do!

Isn't there also an archaic phrase O'Brian uses involving wipe to humiliate someone?

Wipe a person's eye? I'm not really sure the origin of the phrase, and maybe it is still in use in the UK?

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builds character
Jan 16, 2008

Keep at it.

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Yeah impressment existed for a reason. If a man-o-warsman’s life was actually better than life on shore, I doubt the Impress Service would have been so busy.

Don't they talk about this a bit? One of the reasons you have to impress people is that the navy pays less well than other occupations (which also don't involve getting shot as a general rule) so able seamen prefer to be in not-the-navy. I know they impress other folks from time to time but my understanding of the practice generally is that it was primarily for sailors.

Phenotype
Jul 24, 2007

You must defeat Sheng Long to stand a chance.



builds character posted:

Don't they talk about this a bit? One of the reasons you have to impress people is that the navy pays less well than other occupations (which also don't involve getting shot as a general rule) so able seamen prefer to be in not-the-navy. I know they impress other folks from time to time but my understanding of the practice generally is that it was primarily for sailors.

I think it paid better than other laborer jobs, it was just that you had to be isolated from the entire world, living in a close packed airless wooden ship with a hundred other filthy sailors, and you had to do hard labor at all hours of the night and your superiors were allowed to beat you and you'd be soaked and wet and miserable, subject to hundred-degree heat and freezing winds and might end up shot or drowned or mutilated from flying splinters. I know they talked about how merchantmen paid better than the Navy, but that was probably not a factor for the average impressed landsman.

builds character
Jan 16, 2008

Keep at it.

Phenotype posted:

I think it paid better than other laborer jobs, it was just that you had to be isolated from the entire world, living in a close packed airless wooden ship with a hundred other filthy sailors, and you had to do hard labor at all hours of the night and your superiors were allowed to beat you and you'd be soaked and wet and miserable, subject to hundred-degree heat and freezing winds and might end up shot or drowned or mutilated from flying splinters. I know they talked about how merchantmen paid better than the Navy, but that was probably not a factor for the average impressed landsman.

Sorry if I’m missing something and being dumb here. My point was that it pays worse than other sailor jobs and impressment is really for sailors not landsmen. Despite all the landsmen who get impressed by Jack.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

I believe impressment was technically for sailors only, but anyone who’d been to sea at any point would count, even if they’d been living on dry land for ages. I tried finding a solid source but most seem a bit vague on this point.

Nuclear War
Nov 7, 2012

You're a pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty girl


Fire Safety Doug posted:

I believe impressment was technically for sailors only, but anyone who’d been to sea at any point would count, even if they’d been living on dry land for ages. I tried finding a solid source but most seem a bit vague on this point.

Its mentioned in the books. some guy who spent 6 months puking his guts out in the channel, then went ashore and barely even looked at water after that for years got picked up by a pressgang because he had an anchor tattoo. Stephen sends him ashore for a made up medical liability as a kindness since he would lose his business otherwise. But as Aubrey would say "its a hard service"

Lockback
Sep 2, 2006

All days are nights to see till I see thee; and nights bright days when dreams do show me thee.


Fire Safety Doug posted:

I believe impressment was technically for sailors only, but anyone who’d been to sea at any point would count, even if they’d been living on dry land for ages. I tried finding a solid source but most seem a bit vague on this point.

Yeah, impressment was for sailors but like any policy like that it can be horribly abused. A lot of the horror stories aren't true but people definitely got pressed beyond what the scope intended.

Jack trying to press the men arresting him for outstanding debts is supposed to be levity, but I'm sure there are tons of stories of people who never should have been on a boat getting pressed.

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





At one point later in the series, one of or both Stephen and Jack muse upon the difference in morale between pressed men serving resignedly under a hard horse captain and the freely enlisted American sailors. This was during the War of 1812, when the British are repeatedly stunned by American victories at sea. I thought that was an interesting sidebar by O'Brian.

thekeeshman
Feb 21, 2007


Also I think some people were turned over to the navy as an alternative to a prison sentence, which also can't have been great for either discipline and morale. And O'Brien does touch on the effects of tyrannical captains, look at Corbett in The Mauritius Command.

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

Yeah, serving under Jack Aubrey is both figuratively and literally winning the lottery.

Nektu
Jul 4, 2007

FUKKEN FUUUUUUCK


Cybernetic Crumb

Which edition of the audio books is the good edition?

MeatwadIsGod
Sep 30, 2004

Behold! It is I! I bestow upon you...my dirty dipey!


Nektu posted:

Which edition of the audio books is the good edition?

Patrick Tull's narration

uPen
Jan 25, 2010

Zu Rodina!

Nektu posted:

Which edition of the audio books is the good edition?

https://www.audible.com/pd/Master-a...book/B002V0KS9A

ChubbyChecker
Mar 25, 2018



MeatwadIsGod posted:

Patrick Tull's narration

Phy
Jun 27, 2008





Fun Shoe

Well, I finally finished Blue At The Mizzen today, nearly five years on from when I first dove into Master and Commander on my honeymoon.

Part of me spent the book looking for signs that O'Brian was in some way losing his touch. I think I have my sadness over Terry Pratchett's last few books to thank for that, but thankfully this was just as much of an Aubrey-Maturin as any of them. There were moments that surprised me, to be certain - Horatio Hanson feels like, for want of better words, a backdoor pilot for a new series, and then there's Jack's homesickness at Sophie's letter, or his reference to some element of rigging that sounded to Stephen like a vulgarity even worse than the usual naval standard, that I couldn't parse at all. But there's the usual delightful turns of phrase ("pistols for two, and coffee for one"), old friends like Joe Plaice and Awkward Davies and a reference to Stephen's boiled-poo poo rocks, and the book ends about as well as one might hope - on a high note, with Surprise racing off at the summons of the Admiralty, for another adventure that, at long last, we're not privileged to see.

I'm going to read these again sometime. It may take a while, but I'll be back.

Lockback
Sep 2, 2006

All days are nights to see till I see thee; and nights bright days when dreams do show me thee.


I wouldn't pay for it but you can also read the first 60 pages or so of the unfinished voyage. Blue at the Mizzen was a really good place to end things and Unfinished really just starts the table setting that isn't terribly interesting before stopping.

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Phy posted:

... his reference to some element of rigging that sounded to Stephen like a vulgarity even worse than the usual naval standard, that I couldn't parse at all. ...

I'm going to read these again sometime. It may take a while, but I'll be back.
Well I've started the steady search through 300 pages for vulgar rigging but it's gonna be like finding Atlantis without a chart. Perhaps some hint and we can interpret for you?

Also there's no better time to start reading than now. The first books are obviously different, takes a few to really get going, but there's some good connection through the novels that you've doubtless forgotten.

They were published over a period of 30 years, so you're still reading them "fairly quickly".

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Well I've started the steady search through 300 pages for vulgar rigging but it's gonna be like finding Atlantis without a chart. Perhaps some hint and we can interpret for you?

Also there's no better time to start reading than now. The first books are obviously different, takes a few to really get going, but there's some good connection through the novels that you've doubtless forgotten.

They were published over a period of 30 years, so you're still reading them "fairly quickly".

oval office splice, you lubber.

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Mr. Mambold posted:

oval office splice, you lubber.
Ohhh ABOK 2832. And what do I know about that first word, being a heathen buggerer?

Standing rigging around a spar, where two lines are meeting in opposite directions. It takes more rope to eye splice each end around the spar, so you send them around either side of the spar and long splice each end into the other side. Basically ---O---

We won't discuss the out come with more incoming lines.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.




Hair Elf

Kaiser suggested I post here with a link to my project thread in DIY. I made a wooden model ship, and I'm now working on posting the entire build log there. The ship in question is fairly period relevant to O'Brian's stuff, as it is an Armed Virginia Sloop of 1768, an example of an American Privateer of the era.

Link to project - The saga of a wood model ship build

This thread reminds me that I should get back into this book series. I own the first 12 but only managed to finish the first 2 for some reason.

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





From the reddit sub- deleted scenes from Master & Commander

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Y1DCX1ZK_s

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Raskolnikov2089
Nov 3, 2006

Schizzy to the matic

Mr. Mambold posted:

From the reddit sub- deleted scenes from Master & Commander

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Y1DCX1ZK_s

Jack swimming with clothes on? What is this nonsense.

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