Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«103 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Hopper
Dec 28, 2004

BOOING! BOOING!

Grimey Drawer

BTW I plan on making mapo tofu (plus maybe some other stuff) from the website linked earlier using all the stuff I was given, not sure when I get to do it but I will post a pic. Can the beef be added to the tofu when serving? Might have a vegetarian eating with us.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Allstone
Apr 14, 2012


Someone apologised for getting tea on my food today and I just remembered that tea-smoked chicken and duck exist and are incredible. Can anybody give me some words about tea-smoking?

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


Hopper posted:

Can the beef be added to the tofu when serving? Might have a vegetarian eating with us.

Serve the beef with the tofu and it will be the last time you have a vegetarian issue.

Archenteron
Nov 3, 2006



Anyone have a preferred recipe for fen zheng rou?

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Here's a typical kung pao chicken from the place by where I work. They're a little lighter on the huajiao than I like but otherwise this is pretty normal when you get it here in Chengdu.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Hauki
May 11, 2010



Thanks to you all I went and bought a bunch of hua jiao today and made kung pao for dinner tonight. May not be the best but it's a lot more satisfying than ordering takeout from the Cantonese places around here.

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


I went on a drunken shopping spree at H-Mart and came home with steam powder.

What do?

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


The gently caress is steam powder? Can you post the label?

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



rice flour?

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Or is it seasoning for when you're steaming things?

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


Heh, I GIS'd an ended up finding an answer to my question!

http://diningwithdrake.blogspot.com...er-moments.html

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



remote control carnivore posted:

I went on a drunken shopping spree at H-Mart and came home with steam powder.

What do?



Archenteron posted:

Anyone have a preferred recipe for fen zheng rou?

You two should meet up cuz you can use that powder to make fen zheng rou.

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


So re: Sichuan peppercorns, how do I get them to not be like, dry flakes in the dish? I have a big m+p that works just enough fine for everything else, but for some reason the peppercorns are noticeable big flakes

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


That's just kinda how they are. They usually aren't ground up or anything in Sichuan, they just throw handfuls of them in whole and you crunch them.

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



Yeah most sichuan food includes the fun minigame of "avoid the sichuan peppercorns". Using them whole makes this easier.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Avoid them? My respect for your humanity has vanished.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Grand Fromage posted:

Avoid them? My respect for your humanity has vanished.

Yeah for reals

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Bad thing is I've built up a tolerance and now I almost never get buzzymouth from Sichuan food anymore.

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



I did that when I first moved here and all my Sichuan friends made fun of me.

Hauki
May 11, 2010



Grand Fromage posted:

Bad thing is I've built up a tolerance and now I almost never get buzzymouth from Sichuan food anymore.

I have to eat a lot at once to get buzzymouth anymore. Also it goes away after a few seconds

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

So I'm not the only one throwing in like a quarter cup of those things every time I use them?

I even started putting them in my popcorn.

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



It's always been my understanding they were kinda like bay leaves in that they give the dish a nice flavor but you avoid eating them directly.

Lhet
Apr 2, 2008

bloop


Wondering if anybody could identify a couple foods I remember having in China back when I went several years ago.
The first I had a few different ways, but was usually banana/sweet potatoes with a hot sugary coating that started soft but hardened as it cooled.
The second was some peanut-based street food that tasted pretty much like the filling of a Butterfinger candy bar. I think I had it near Xi'an.

Mister Facetious
Apr 21, 2007

Raging Goblin is unaffected by microtransactions.

He raged at Call of Duty, at the pubbies, at his ISP. But mostly he just raged.

Been making "scallion oil noodles" using this recipe for the last two weeks:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5me5Cgt3-M

Tonight was my first time using fresh made noodles (Shanghai style, similar in size to linguine, but thicker/more squared off) instead of dry, and man; the difference is night and day.
Fully cooked, yet pleasantly chewy, and the recipe is so simple, you can Swiss Army knife it with additions to taste.

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



Lhet posted:

Wondering if anybody could identify a couple foods I remember having in China back when I went several years ago.
The first I had a few different ways, but was usually banana/sweet potatoes with a hot sugary coating that started soft but hardened as it cooled.
The second was some peanut-based street food that tasted pretty much like the filling of a Butterfinger candy bar. I think I had it near Xi'an.

The first is called "ba si/巴斯" which I have no idea how to translate. It's any sort of thing that is covered in a sugar coating, and generally served with cold water you dip it in to solidify the sugar before eating. 巴斯地瓜 would be sweet potato and 巴斯香蕉 would be banana, just whatever the thing is after 巴斯。

The second was probably 花生糖/hua sheng tang (lit. peanut sugar) which is kinda like a less-sweet Chinese version of peanut brittle, but Xi'an could also have a regional thing that I just don't know about. Huashengtang is sold on street corners and by snack carts a lot in most of China, though.

Mister Facetious
Apr 21, 2007

Raging Goblin is unaffected by microtransactions.

He raged at Call of Duty, at the pubbies, at his ISP. But mostly he just raged.

Lhet posted:

The first I had a few different ways, but was usually banana/sweet potatoes with a hot sugary coating that started soft but hardened as it cooled.

There's a video by the same dude I just posted about that one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Tom-l-YVvs

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


Magna Kaser posted:

You two should meet up cuz you can use that powder to make fen zheng rou.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Grand Fromage posted:

Avoid them? My respect for your humanity has vanished.

For real. Y'all scrubs can send all unwanted hua jiao to me.

Mr. Wiggles posted:

So I'm not the only one throwing in like a quarter cup of those things every time I use them?

I even started putting them in my popcorn.

If putting it on everything is wrong, I don't want to be right. Fried chicken, eggs, rice, anything can be ma la.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Magna Kaser posted:

It's always been my understanding they were kinda like bay leaves in that they give the dish a nice flavor but you avoid eating them directly.

You should remove the seed? from inside, though. Better to just buy higher quality product with it already removed, I think they sell that right? They only have ones with the seeds still in them in my local markets.

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer

So I had some late night hot pot and dinner in Shenzhen. It's a chain of Chongqing style hotpot restaurant. I just learned that the spicy base is actually butter based?





The bill was cheap as hell as well for 2/3 people - lamb, beef, two kinds of tofu, veggie platter, beer and whatever. 314 RMB - 40 bucks total.

Anyways, what other Chinese dish uses a lot of butter? I'm just really surprised.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



That tofu looks exactly like chicken. Amazing!

Hauki
May 11, 2010



I think a lot of xinjiang and/or uighur food uses butter?

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Chicken was free and came with the clear soup. But the veggies and tofu were not in the photo...


Hauki posted:

I think a lot of xinjiang and/or uighur food uses butter?

Tibetan and Uighur food is not really Chinese

Da pan ji is actually an amazing fusion dish. Han people brought over the noodles and chicken and Uighurs used cumin and spices. It's tasty but the portions tend to be mega huge.

Lhet
Apr 2, 2008

bloop


Magna Kaser posted:

The first is called "ba si/巴斯" which I have no idea how to translate. It's any sort of thing that is covered in a sugar coating, and generally served with cold water you dip it in to solidify the sugar before eating. 巴斯地瓜 would be sweet potato and 巴斯香蕉 would be banana, just whatever the thing is after 巴斯。

Mister Macys posted:

There's a video by the same dude I just posted about that one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Tom-l-YVvs
Excellent! This is exactly what I was thinking of!

Magna Kaser posted:

The second was probably 花生糖/hua sheng tang (lit. peanut sugar) which is kinda like a less-sweet Chinese version of peanut brittle, but Xi'an could also have a regional thing that I just don't know about. Huashengtang is sold on street corners and by snack carts a lot in most of China, though.
I don't think that's it, but looking that up lead me to 贡糖 (peanut candy), which looks pretty much exactly like what I'm remembering, so thanks!

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



Bertrand Hustle posted:

If putting it on everything is wrong, I don't want to be right. Fried chicken, eggs, rice, anything can be ma la.

Ya, just by merit of living in Sichuan I'd say nearing 100% of my meals have some (large) amount of huajiao in them. I really like the citrusy, ma la flavor. I just don't seek them out to munch on individually.

Part of that goes into cracks Sichuan people make about their own food being way too "abundant" and wasteful where like 50% of any given dish is dried chilies, hua jiao and big hunks of ginger that are mainly there for flavor. When a dish is "finished" here generally the plate still looks full. I think the worst culprit of this is lazi ji which is really good but has like a 9:1 ratio of dried chilies and huajiao to chicken.


Mister Macys posted:

There's a video by the same dude I just posted about that one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Tom-l-YVvs

Video was informative, I finally learned why it had that name. Apparently the regional written name I learned for the dish is a near meaningless homophone for another set of "ba si" characters which is used in other (most???) places and actually means something.

Mister Facetious
Apr 21, 2007

Raging Goblin is unaffected by microtransactions.

He raged at Call of Duty, at the pubbies, at his ISP. But mostly he just raged.

What does one use this for:

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



Those are a type of mushroom which has some TCM purposes, and is mainly in a lot of sweet dessert-like soups that make you more beautiful or something. No idea what the English name is but they're normally "银耳“ or "silver ears" in Chinese, the package you have calls them "snow ears". I think "white fungus” or "silver ears" will get you that thing in English.

The most common thing I can think of is the 六味 soup which is that and a bunch of other stuff like dried longan and lotus seeds. You can probably find some recipes searching for "lok mei" since it's a cantonese dish.

Overall it's basically flavorless and I think it's only used in stuff for the TCM properties.

Rurutia
Jun 11, 2009


We call them white wood ear mushroom (bai mu er). They see pretty flavorless but I always felt it was more about the texture. My family ate it a lot.

nadav
Sep 6, 2005
My last name is actually something very jewish. Like Leibovitz, only longer. And more jewish.

Made mapo last night and it was awesome. Should fermented black beans be refrigerated?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



nadav posted:

Made mapo last night and it was awesome. Should fermented black beans be refrigerated?

I have never done so but it probably wouldn't hurt.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«103 »