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Pookah
Aug 21, 2008

Caw





Adult Sword Owner posted:

I received a new gigantic wok for Christmas and just tried to season it. I've seasoned woks before but I don't remember them looking this..Spotty I guess? Should I go another round? I charred some onions as the post season treatment and it felt fine.



Did you wash it first?

Most chinese market woks I've had tend to come coated with some kind of heavy oil for transportation, so you need to seriously wash and dry them first before coating them with an eating-safe oil for seasoning. That wok looks very weird; to be honest, I'd clean it very well then start again with decent oil for seasoning.

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Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Pookah posted:

Did you wash it first?

Most chinese market woks I've had tend to come coated with some kind of heavy oil for transportation, so you need to seriously wash and dry them first before coating them with an eating-safe oil for seasoning. That wok looks very weird; to be honest, I'd clean it very well then start again with decent oil for seasoning.

I scrubbed it pretty well and there was nothing wrong with the oil I used

I'll try again I guess

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Some coatings are harder to wash off than others.

One wok I got was so stubborn I had to burn the coating off with a chimney starter.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer


The wok nebula

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


I'll scrub it the heck down and try again

Hopefully I can get it decent the second time because I was really hoping to make ma po today

(even though the wok currently looks like it would fit that name am i rite)

Thoht
Aug 3, 2006



You can see at the start of this video that the guy starts by burning off all the coating that comes on it. I'm guessing you didn't do that.

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Thoht posted:

You can see at the start of this video that the guy starts by burning off all the coating that comes on it. I'm guessing you didn't do that.

poo poo, and mine looks a lot like that one too

Might be warm enough to do that next week

I did two rounds today of scrub and season and it looks exactly the same

e: wait not really, that looks like an Ikea wok and mine was some hand hammered setup and I followed the care book exactly

E2: vvvv I am going to burn the hell out of it now.

Adult Sword Owner fucked around with this message at Jan 5, 2017 around 10:41

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Probably best to always burn your wok first

Thoht
Aug 3, 2006



Cool, it's not a huge deal or anything. That's the nice thing about carbon steel cookware; no matter how nasty it gets you can always just burn it back to bare metal and reseason.

CAPS LOCK BROKEN
Feb 1, 2006

ASK ME ABOUT PRC HAN SUPERIORITY AND THE INFERIORITY OF THE LESSER JUNGLE ASIAN RACES AND UIGHUR TERRORIST RACES

p.s. my girlfriend dumped me for a white girl because of liberal intersectional feminism AMA


al-azad posted:

Having never used Sichuan peppers before, I bought a bag from the local market but I'm dumb and have no idea how to use this properly? There are quite a lot of black kernels which have a texture like you're chomping on sand. The brand, as far as I can tell, is "Healthy Tang" so either there's a technique I don't know about to separate the soft outer shell from the gritty kernel or I need to find a better brand!

I grind them up in a spice grinder and throw in a pinch when cooking meat. Also mapo tofu etc. etc.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


I made mapo tofu for the first time. I will never have to order it again. This is great.

2 questions:

What is everyone doing to get that gorgeous red sauce? Mine was a little more of the brown-red side until I added a little bit of angry lady chili sauce with black bean.
Are the right fermented beans for this found in a jar or bag? I've got two huge Asian groceries near me, but it's hard finding help there.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



I've never seen doubanjiang sold in a bag.

I made dumplings for New Year and they were rad. I also made kung pao chicken and managed to get my pan hot enough to get it right. Cauliflower and pork belly is becoming a staple. I wish I could get lotus root here or I would eat it with minced pork and black bean sauce every day. Next up 鱼香 sauce. Still have to try Farmer Potatoes. I'm stoked.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Cauliflower recipe?

Hopper
Dec 28, 2004

BOOING! BOOING!

Grimey Drawer

THE MACHO MAN posted:

I made mapo tofu for the first time. I will never have to order it again. This is great.

2 questions:

What is everyone doing to get that gorgeous red sauce? Mine was a little more of the brown-red side until I added a little bit of angry lady chili sauce with black bean.
Are the right fermented beans for this found in a jar or bag? I've got two huge Asian groceries near me, but it's hard finding help there.

I didn't do anything for redness, maybe it comes down to the doubanjing (spelling?) you use? Mine was the original stuff from Sichuan.

As for the fermented beans (ask for fermented soy beans), I bought them in a little bag, they look like less wrinkyl raisins. The onyl size I could get was 200g sadly, which was way too much (I had to bin the rest out yesterday, as they had grown a bit of fur), if you can get as littel as possible, unless you use them a lot.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Arglebargle III posted:

I've never seen doubanjiang sold in a bag.

I buy China Famous Brand Pixian Doubanjiang and it comes in a bag. In fact, the only brand I've ever seen in a non-bag container was in a plastic tub and the only time I ever bought it, it had bits of broken glass in it.

So I'm fine decanting my bagged doubanjiang into a washed out glass jar. Douchi (fermented black beans), on the other hand, I have only ever seen in jars. I get the one with a picture of a shrimp on the label.

You want the one that says 郫县豆瓣酱 on the package, and to my knowledge it comes in a bag. Douchi is also good to have around, just not for this dish. Douchi is black with small roundish beans, doubanjiang is reddish brown with broad, flat beans.

Bertrand Hustle fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2017 around 14:07

emotive
Dec 26, 2006



THE MACHO MAN posted:

I made mapo tofu for the first time. I will never have to order it again. This is great.

2 questions:

What is everyone doing to get that gorgeous red sauce? Mine was a little more of the brown-red side until I added a little bit of angry lady chili sauce with black bean.
Are the right fermented beans for this found in a jar or bag? I've got two huge Asian groceries near me, but it's hard finding help there.

Chili oil helped get that glossy redness when I made it last.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



Mr. Wiggles posted:

Cauliflower recipe?

Slice cauliflower heads to about half a centimeter in thickness, mince garlic (optional), dice green onion tops (optional), dice pork belly or bacon to bite size, heat a pan with a little oil as hot as you can get it, sear cauliflower and pork with garlic and green onion tops, reduce heat, add black bean garlic sauce, mix, and cover until cauliflower is tender. Add sugar and soy to taste (not very much IMO)

It's pretty braindead and I usually make it with bacon so it's not very authentic but it's a nice 15 minute vegetable course.

You could probably make it with doubanjiang but I don't recall it every being that salty or hot when I ate it in China.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Sweet thanks

Hopper
Dec 28, 2004

BOOING! BOOING!

Grimey Drawer

Yeah there is a cauliflower recipe on the Sichuan recipe website that was linked in here. I cooked it and it was well received.

willing to settle
Apr 13, 2011


Hopper posted:

As for the fermented beans (ask for fermented soy beans), I bought them in a little bag, they look like less wrinkyl raisins. The onyl size I could get was 200g sadly, which was way too much (I had to bin the rest out yesterday, as they had grown a bit of fur), if you can get as littel as possible, unless you use them a lot.

What are you doing with your douchi that they're going bad in any even slightly quick timeframe?

Hopper
Dec 28, 2004

BOOING! BOOING!

Grimey Drawer

Dunno, may have been accidental crosscontamination, had a white spotty plume on them.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


Of all the doubanjiang I've tried the brands that come in the bags are always the best.

I got some chai pow yu and soy puffs to use in Buddha's delight and I'm wondering how to store the stuff I don't use and how long it might last.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Milk's on them.


I really like those steamed meatballs you get from dim sum places. How do they get the insides of the meatballs to be so tender and juicy? They're a wildly different texture from Western meatballs, which can be kinda grainy and dry. I had some lion's head once too, and those were great. The insides are almost still kinda reddish, but fully cooked, and I don't quite know what it is that results in that kind of texture.

If I do want to steam things, what's my best bet on the cheap? I have one of those metal baskets used for steaming vegetables and the like, but it's merely okay for steaming meats.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



These are different to the dim sum ones, but it might give you an idea: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXjjQzptRZs

emotive
Dec 26, 2006



Do people generally reserve light and dark soy for cooking, and keep an all purpose like Kikkoman for dipping sauces, etc.?

Seems like Fuschia Dunlop pushes tamari quite a bit.

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002
I LOVE MY ASSAULT RIFLE 15 WITH ITS HIGH CAPACITY CLIP/MAGAZINE


Upset Trowel

emotive posted:

Do people generally reserve light and dark soy for cooking, and keep an all purpose like Kikkoman for dipping sauces, etc.?

Seems like Fuschia Dunlop pushes tamari quite a bit.

In my years in China I don't think I ever saw anyone dip Chinese food in kikkoman soy sauce. As far as I know kikkoman is basically Japanese "light soy sauce." Anyway it tastes different.

Though I think they call usukuchi soy sauce "light soy sauce," but it's very different, very salty.

Anyhow I've always just used light Chinese soy sauce for dipping dumplings and stuff here in the states. Fresh shuijiao with soy sauce and black vinegar to dip is a drat fine meal and brings back a lot of happy memories.

Dark soy sauce is just for cooking as far as I know. Soy sauce is mostly just for cooking in general though.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



Can anyone recommend good brands of light and dark soy that would be available at a supermarket?

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002




Grimey Drawer

Pearl bridge

emotive
Dec 26, 2006



hakimashou posted:

In my years in China I don't think I ever saw anyone dip Chinese food in kikkoman soy sauce. As far as I know kikkoman is basically Japanese "light soy sauce." Anyway it tastes different.

Though I think they call usukuchi soy sauce "light soy sauce," but it's very different, very salty.

Anyhow I've always just used light Chinese soy sauce for dipping dumplings and stuff here in the states. Fresh shuijiao with soy sauce and black vinegar to dip is a drat fine meal and brings back a lot of happy memories.

Dark soy sauce is just for cooking as far as I know. Soy sauce is mostly just for cooking in general though.

Cool. Just figured I'd ask.

Made a dipping sauce this morning with light soy, chiankang vinegar, sesame and chili oil for some steamed buns I had and it's delicious so I'll just keep doing t hat.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



BraveUlysses posted:

Pearl bridge

seconded

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer

BraveUlysses posted:

Pearl bridge

I'm shaking my phone.

There's Lee kum kee and if you want to be a herectic add a dash of the Japanese stuff and sprinkle of seasame oil

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer

I'm not sure if your super market sells it but get some 頭秋 or first batch soy. It's more intense with啊stronger umami taste without being too salty and a few brands are selling it as a premium.

If there's a big cantonese population get your hands on pat-chun 八珍. In terms of supermarket soy sauce stuff Lee Kum kee is actually pretty drat good

But when it comes to vinegar, southern china is pretty atrocious compared to the Shaanxi stuff or chenkiang. It's probably because dumplings is more of an afterthought in the south

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002
I LOVE MY ASSAULT RIFLE 15 WITH ITS HIGH CAPACITY CLIP/MAGAZINE


Upset Trowel

emotive posted:

Cool. Just figured I'd ask.

Made a dipping sauce this morning with light soy, chiankang vinegar, sesame and chili oil for some steamed buns I had and it's delicious so I'll just keep doing t hat.

its hard to beat!

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002
I LOVE MY ASSAULT RIFLE 15 WITH ITS HIGH CAPACITY CLIP/MAGAZINE


Upset Trowel

I used to live by the Pearl River so I like Pearl River Bridge because of that.

But I think Lee Kum Kee is also made near around the same place so whatever.

Koon Chun, Lee Kum Kee, or Pearl River Bridge are all good (cantonese) chinese soy sauce/etc makers. Koon Chun is from HK, the other two are from the mainland.

E: Looking my fridge I have Koon Chun light soy, Lee Kum Kee seafood soy sauce, and Pearl River Bridge dark soy.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

I have some pearl rive brdge thats been sitting in a cabinet (previously opened) for years. Still good?

Jeoh
Jul 20, 2010



it was bad the moment it was produced, sorry

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



Arglebargle III posted:

I've never seen doubanjiang sold in a bag.


Pixian, arguably the gold standard in "home style" doubanjiang available commercially, is commonly sold in bags.

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



LKK or GTFO, pearl river can be used (up) for poo poo like tea eggs or the like.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



Force de Fappe posted:

Pixian, arguably the gold standard in "home style" doubanjiang available commercially, is commonly sold in bags.

It now occurs to me that I've never looked for doubanjiang in the area with the bagged sauces.

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Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Arglebargle III posted:

Slice cauliflower heads to about half a centimeter in thickness, mince garlic (optional), dice green onion tops (optional), dice pork belly or bacon to bite size, heat a pan with a little oil as hot as you can get it, sear cauliflower and pork with garlic and green onion tops, reduce heat, add black bean garlic sauce, mix, and cover until cauliflower is tender. Add sugar and soy to taste (not very much IMO)

It's pretty braindead and I usually make it with bacon so it's not very authentic but it's a nice 15 minute vegetable course.

You could probably make it with doubanjiang but I don't recall it every being that salty or hot when I ate it in China.

Quoting so I remember to find this again

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