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Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

Oh yeah, I ended up making this one and it turned out great! Well, mostly, actually forming the Bao was a bit of a learning process as the dough was different from others I've worked with. So a few got messed up along the way, dough too thick, too thin, sauce touched the side so it won't stick closed, ran out of filling with a few left to fill, etc. But they tasted great so that's a huge improvement

One question about it though, mine ended up really cavernous, this was one of the better ones in that regard:

Many others were much more exaggerated than that. Is that pretty normal? Or can I improve that somehow? It just seems a bit sad to have such a huge amount of empty space not filled with delicious pig.
I was thinking maybe I let them sit too long before putting them in the oven?

Also might be worth a mention is that it's hot and humid around here, it was probably something like 90F and ~95% humidity outside. I'm pretty new to any sort of breadmaking but I've heard that can have an impact on rise times and such?

Those look pretty good to me, and forming them definitely takes practice. There's a learning curve when it comes to using wet fillings in dough. The humidity won't help, but they come about because when it cooks, there's nothing for the dough to grab onto so it just rises from the rise that happens when you put dough into a hot oven.

It helps to reduce the sauce plenty until it's very sticky, and then even dust the filling with flour or something, but it's sort of the nature of the beast. Look up tricks when making filled meat breads for a more complete answer.

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Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



Gave them another go yesterday and tried to experiment a bit with them some more. I tried steaming a few, they looked fine when I opened the steamer but then they quickly deflated and looked sad and lumpy. They tasted fine but I definitely prefer them baked with this recipe.

Most of the baked ones ended up breaking on the bottom though and leaking a bit, I'm guessing I just didn't let them sit long enough before putting them in the oven this time, it was already getting really late (like 10pm) so I hurried that part a bit. Still tasted good though. I was getting the method down pretty well though, didn't have any big issues forming them and the thickness was pretty even all around.

My wife suggested I try filling a few with pizza related fillings, so uh that was a thing too

Junji Eat More
Oct 22, 2005

You don't know it, but you are full of stahs

I made red-braised pork for the first time today, and while I was very pleased with the flavor, the texture was off - the meat:fat ratio was way skewed towards fat.

Should I be trimming my pork belly before I start, do I need to find a leaner cut of belly, or do I need to cook it longer to render down the fat? I don't think I could have cooked it longer without burning the sauce.

Also, how thick should the sauce be at the end? The pieces had a fair coating, but there was still some liquid in the bottom of the wok. If I keep going, will more of that thicken up onto the meat?

Junji Eat More fucked around with this message at Aug 15, 2017 around 01:44

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


You can add water if you need to.

Amergin
Jan 29, 2013

THE SOUND A WET FART MAKES


Junji Eat More posted:

I made red-braised pork for the first time today, and while I was very pleased with the flavor, the texture was off - the meat:fat ratio was way skewed towards fat.

Should I be trimming my pork belly before I start, do I need to find a leaner cut of belly, or do I need to cook it longer to render down the fat? I don't think I could have cooked it longer without burning the sauce.

Also, how thick should the sauce be at the end? The pieces had a fair coating, but there was still some liquid in the bottom of the wok. If I keep going, will more of that thicken up onto the meat?

Usually the way I've seen it out here is half/half meat and fat, with a few pieces being skewed one way or the other. However I would say don't overthink it: red-braising is just a way of cooking and a type of sauce, not necessarily "a particular dish" so if the meat is too fatty for you feel then free to trim it. You definitely still want some fat, sure, but trimming it a bit and aiming for more of a 2 meat:1 fat ratio won't hurt the dish IMHO. Then you can use that extra fat for other things (common problem here and I usually throw extra fat around asparagus, broccoli or cauliflower for roasted veggies, or use it for rice).

Likewise I've seen the sauce thinner and thicker depending on what you want to do with it. If for example you want to make a noodle bowl with it, you might want to make it thinner or mix it with some soy sauce, vinegar, etc. to make more of a soup/sauce to coat the noodles. If you're eating the pork by itself or maybe in a sandwich/wrap then you can have the sauce be thicker, similar to the consistency of a lot of American Chinese sauces (ex. sweet & sour pork consistency). If you're doing rice bowls with some veggies and such, then you might prefer something in the middle.

Having liquid at the bottom isn't a problem, if anything that gives you some extra to make a sauce with and use. Add some water or soy for a thinner sauce, if you want thicker then you can shortcut with cornstarch or maybe cook some potato strips or something in it to thicken it. If you were happy with the way the meat was flavored then don't worry about getting all of the sauce "attached" or cooked off onto the meat.

Amergin fucked around with this message at Aug 15, 2017 around 03:35

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



Junji Eat More posted:

I made red-braised pork for the first time today, and while I was very pleased with the flavor, the texture was off - the meat:fat ratio was way skewed towards fat.

Should I be trimming my pork belly before I start, do I need to find a leaner cut of belly, or do I need to cook it longer to render down the fat? I don't think I could have cooked it longer without burning the sauce.

Also, how thick should the sauce be at the end? The pieces had a fair coating, but there was still some liquid in the bottom of the wok. If I keep going, will more of that thicken up onto the meat?

Having lived in Hunan I assure you that's just how it is. Roll with it or trim it.

I would describe the authentic dish as soupy and greasy.

If you want a Hunan greasy spoon standard I'd go with Tang braised sausage. I wish I had a recipe. It's like thin sliced Chinese sausage simmered in strong alcohol and served with julienned hot peppers (Of course) over rice. Fragrant boozy greasy and has a kick that's delayed by the fat.

The coarse Midwest kind of sausage not the fine grained southeast kind.

TBH the epitome of Hunan diner food is the humble pork fried rice. Best fried rice I've ever had I had in Hunan whether it was some guy in an alley with a wok and coal stove or a restaurant. I was poor in Hunan so I don't know about nice restaurants.

The ultimate Hunan 3AM drunk food is stinky tofu.

Arglebargle III fucked around with this message at Aug 15, 2017 around 04:55

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



I found a recipe, it's just julienned green peppers, 唐人神 sausage, garlic and onions stir fried. If you want it boozy finish with booze. I swear my favorite place made it with baijiu.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Milk's on them.


Arglebargle III posted:

I found a recipe, it's just julienned green peppers, 唐人神 sausage, garlic and onions stir fried. If you want it boozy finish with booze. I swear my favorite place made it with baijiu.

Well, poo poo. I might grab some booze of my own and try making this. We're talking this kind of Chinese sausage, right? I used to cook these alongside the rice in my rice cooker and pour soy sauce on it, and it came out pretty drat good.



So I know that a lot of the typical Chinese-American standards aren't easy or particularly possible at home, since you need really really high heat that you don't get in home kitchens. That said, fried rice is more than possible, but I kinda hosed it up today. So, questions:

1. Are you supposed to use 1~2 day old fried rice, or freshly made rice? The common knowledge is one or two days old, but I've also heard otherwise.
2. How do you know when your fried rice is ready? Is it meant to be slightly starchy/sticky, or more crumbly like you usually get in take-out?

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



Pollyanna posted:

Well, poo poo. I might grab some booze of my own and try making this. We're talking this kind of Chinese sausage, right? I used to cook these alongside the rice in my rice cooker and pour soy sauce on it, and it came out pretty drat good.



So I know that a lot of the typical Chinese-American standards aren't easy or particularly possible at home, since you need really really high heat that you don't get in home kitchens. That said, fried rice is more than possible, but I kinda hosed it up today. So, questions:

1. Are you supposed to use 1~2 day old fried rice, or freshly made rice? The common knowledge is one or two days old, but I've also heard otherwise.
2. How do you know when your fried rice is ready? Is it meant to be slightly starchy/sticky, or more crumbly like you usually get in take-out?

The rice doesn't have to be that old, but it can't be like right out of the rice cooker and into the wok. The issue is it needs to be at least a little dry. The reason you always hear 1-2 days old is because fried rice is traditionally a thing you did in China with leftovers, it's not really for any real requirement for cooking.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2016/02/...pe-of-rice.html This has a way too in-depth writeup as part of this, but the bottom line is you can use rice you've just made as long as you take it out of the rice cooker, spread it out on a plate, and let the moisture evaporate off for a few minutes.

He also explains how not to store rice because a lot of older rice can be really bad for fried rice if you store it the wrong way.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


I'd also recommend rinsing your uncooked rice a couple/few times if you plan to use it for fried rice, as well as using a little less water than you would for good sticky steamed rice.

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



Soak and rinse the rice no matter what, all types of rice seem to benefit from it. Fried rice is finished when you can get your god damned antsy kid to finally sit down at the table for ten seconds.

Also always make la chang. Even the fancy Hong Kong-bought hand cut stuff is laps (heh) behind the ones I make myself.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


I prefer not to rinse my rice for when I want some nice gooey rice. Mmm, gooey steamed rice.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



totalnewbie posted:

I prefer not to rinse my rice for when I want some nice gooey rice. Mmm, gooey steamed rice.

You have disrespected 5000 years of culture.

I'm not joking this time.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



Pollyanna posted:

Well, poo poo. I might grab some booze of my own and try making this. We're talking this kind of Chinese sausage, right?

That's right. I made it with Johnsonville brats and Serrano peppers and a ton of sherry and it was still good greasy spoon fare.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Milk's on them.


I wonder if I can blacken the peppers ala rajas and use those. It's lo-carb, too!

Tried stir frying some bok choy tonight in vegetable oil, salt, and some minced garlic added at the end. Came out surprisingly well, I expected it to be all limp and mushy like the last time I tried to stir fry greens (ended up accidentally braising them instead) so I pulled them out right when they got floppy and it was choice. I sliced the stem/white part of bok choy really thin and that helped a lot. Much more preferable to the more common method I see of braising the poo poo out of bok choy until its a piece of mushy crap.

Definitely making it again. I like the idea of stir fried greens but my local grocery store always has a really really lovely selection of produce, usually some romaine lettuce and collards. Also, lots of dandelion greens. People eat dandelion?

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Dandelion greens rule. Lucky that you have thosem

esselfortium
Jul 19, 2006

Cumulonimbus Antagonistic Posting

My girlfriend and I recently bought a carbon steel wok from the Wok Shop based on recommendations in this thread. This is our first time owning a wok, and we feel very much in over our heads with it. We have an electric stove, btw.

We followed the instructions Wok Shop sent us to season it: cleaned it, coated it in oil and put it in the oven at 425 for half an hour, then took it out, heated it on the stovetop with oil, and cooked a bunch of diced-up onion in it until they got reasonably charred.

While we had the onions cooking in it, the bottom of the wok's cooking surface started to blacken, but the seasoning started to get significant scratches and scrapes where the original color was showing through. I tried salvaging it by seasoning it on the stovetop with some more oil, but it didn't work out. We cooked fried rice tonight, and it all had to be thrown out because there were little black chunks strewn through it and the whole thing tasted overwhelmingly like metal and burntness. The seasoning on the bottom scrapes off distressingly easily without a lot of effort.

What's the right way to do this so we can get it properly seasoned and be able to cook with our new wok? Thank you to anyone who can help!

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

I think seasoning flaking off is more common with new seasoning and it will get better with time.

But for now try baking at 500f in the oven and do it 3 times and make sure the layers of oil are thin not thick

Steve Yun fucked around with this message at Sep 4, 2017 around 08:25

esselfortium
Jul 19, 2006

Cumulonimbus Antagonistic Posting

Hmm, alright. I'm guessing that we ought to try to scour off the existing messed-up seasoning first before trying that?

Also, would it be better to buy some flaxseed oil to use for this instead of vegetable oil?

esselfortium fucked around with this message at Sep 4, 2017 around 13:39

Arcturas
Mar 30, 2011



In my experience, seasoning takes forever to do properly. You can do the oil -> wipe with towels -> bake forever -> clean -> repeat route, and that works reasonably well. I find that produces a pan whose surface is roughly similar to a standard pan (i.e. use lots of oil, watch out for sticking, yadda yadda). Even then, the "seasoning" does scratch when you cook and clean it. That's fine. Just keep using it. Over time (months to years) you'll get a true patina and something more non-stick.

For example, I use my wok...twice a month? Ish? Less for a few years there, and much more the last few months. We've had it for four or five years now. It is finally getting pretty solidly non-stick. Even my wok, though, still has a band roughly where my metal spatula tends to hit it that's more silvery-colored rather than a darker patina. But because of the seasoning it's still pretty slick. The upper edges of the wok are not terribly non-stick because they don't get too much action or oil but eh.

Maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I clean my wok by getting it pretty drat hot after getting my food out, then tossing it under my faucet and scrubbing it with a bamboo brush as the boiling water loosens everything.

esselfortium
Jul 19, 2006

Cumulonimbus Antagonistic Posting

Scouring off the botched attempt at wok seasoning is proving extraordinarily difficult. We'll keep trying and get rid of as much as we can, but is it possible to get away with leaving the original (flaking-off) seasoning attempt underneath and just seasoning it again that way, or are we in trouble?

I'm afraid of wasting a lot of oil and a lot of time trying to season it again and ending up still having it chipping off into our food because of what was left underneath, but I don't know how we're going to get this all scoured off...

esselfortium fucked around with this message at Sep 7, 2017 around 21:23

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

If you can get heat above 700f it will burn off completely in a minute or two, instantly at 800f. Got a charcoal grill?

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

I live in a lovely apartment with a lovely glass stove top, is there any way for me to start wokking or am I boned

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


AnonSpore posted:

I live in a lovely apartment with a lovely glass stove top, is there any way for me to start wokking or am I boned
Yeah, just get a flat-bottom carbon steel wok and go to town. If you need a super-hot cook surface just keep in mind you might have to heat the pan for longer to get up to temperature and work in small batches to avoid crashing the temperature when you add food to it. But not everything (or even the majority of things) you might want to do with a wok needs a lava-hot surface. And literally every range made will gleefully heat a pan over the autoignition temperature of cooking oils, which is hotter than you need for any kind of cooking you're likely to do in a residential kitchen. The imagined unsuitability of everything other than mega high-output wok burners for wok cooking is greatly exaggerated by people eager to demonstrate that they're familiar with the term `wok hei'. The stove I currently have is a lovely 19K glass top and it's definitely not what I'd pick given other options but if you keep its limitations in mind it's entirely loving serviceable, so don't let purists scare you away from cooking.

emotive
Dec 26, 2006



Cooking in batches is definitely key on less powerful stoves. It's made a world of difference for me.

Just be careful in an apartment, you don't want to set the smoke alarms off and piss off all your neighbors...

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

I'm back friends, looking for opinions/preferences on veggies in twice cooked pork! I personally prefer scallions and red peppers, but I've seen a few recipes suggest onions as well.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


I like leeks and big hunks of green cabbage.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


I do leeks and big chili peppers that I've already roasted to get the skin kinda black and bubbly.

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



AnonSpore posted:

I'm back friends, looking for opinions/preferences on veggies in twice cooked pork! I personally prefer scallions and red peppers, but I've seen a few recipes suggest onions as well.

You have a lot of options. Here in Sichuan the most common ones are:

Scallions and Leeks
Potatoes (sliced very thinly)
Green peppers
Cabbage
If you can find it, "Suan Miao" is super good for this, but is hard to find if you don't have good access to Chinese markets.

Or if you want to go super duper oldschool Sichuan, you can also add day old bread. This one is actually my favorite type of twice cooked pork.



"Guo kui" is the bread they normally use, and looks like this. It's generally lightly fried then baked. These are chopped up into small pieces then just fried up with everything else and is super duper good. You could probably make a decent facsimile with some sort of pita or similar unleavened bread.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


As promised, my 'effort' post on making doubanjiang at home (Check the album for most of the effort). I was unable to source traditional ingredients which should be of no surprise to anyone as I'm about 7500 miles away from where the ingredients are typically grown. The biggest positives is that this is 100% gluten free, but it will really come down to the flavors. It very likely won't taste nearly the same, but if it ends up in the same ballpark for flavor profile I'll call it a success.

Temperature and humidity control are a pain while growing the mold. I ended up using my oven as a proofing box and I used bricks to control the temperature with a pan of hot water placed on top of them for evaporation.

Incidentally, if you're not used to cutting up about 2 kg of chili peppers in one sitting, your hand is likely to get sore. I didn't want to use a food processor and I didn't have anything else that would give me a decent chop. That and you have to destem them all anyway.

It smells a little yeasty right now with a hint of citrus and funk, but it's also under 1/4 inch of oil, so a lot of the aroma isn't available.



Whole album here https://imgur.com/a/mHf1j

Next summer I'm considering making soy sauce, because most of the GF ones out there are a little thin on flavor when most of the flavor should be coming from the soy beans and fermentation/oxidation anyway.

Stuparoni
Nov 2, 2016

Just... hee hee

SubG posted:

Yeah, just get a flat-bottom carbon steel wok and go to town. If you need a super-hot cook surface just keep in mind you might have to heat the pan for longer to get up to temperature and work in small batches to avoid crashing the temperature when you add food to it. But not everything (or even the majority of things) you might want to do with a wok needs a lava-hot surface. And literally every range made will gleefully heat a pan over the autoignition temperature of cooking oils, which is hotter than you need for any kind of cooking you're likely to do in a residential kitchen. The imagined unsuitability of everything other than mega high-output wok burners for wok cooking is greatly exaggerated by people eager to demonstrate that they're familiar with the term `wok hei'. The stove I currently have is a lovely 19K glass top and it's definitely not what I'd pick given other options but if you keep its limitations in mind it's entirely loving serviceable, so don't let purists scare you away from cooking.

A cast iron skillet preheated in the oven can do some pretty serious stir-fry.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Jhet posted:

As promised, my 'effort' post on making doubanjiang at home (Check the album for most of the effort). I was unable to source traditional ingredients which should be of no surprise to anyone as I'm about 7500 miles away from where the ingredients are typically grown. The biggest positives is that this is 100% gluten free, but it will really come down to the flavors. It very likely won't taste nearly the same, but if it ends up in the same ballpark for flavor profile I'll call it a success.

Temperature and humidity control are a pain while growing the mold. I ended up using my oven as a proofing box and I used bricks to control the temperature with a pan of hot water placed on top of them for evaporation.

Incidentally, if you're not used to cutting up about 2 kg of chili peppers in one sitting, your hand is likely to get sore. I didn't want to use a food processor and I didn't have anything else that would give me a decent chop. That and you have to destem them all anyway.

It smells a little yeasty right now with a hint of citrus and funk, but it's also under 1/4 inch of oil, so a lot of the aroma isn't available.



Whole album here https://imgur.com/a/mHf1j

Next summer I'm considering making soy sauce, because most of the GF ones out there are a little thin on flavor when most of the flavor should be coming from the soy beans and fermentation/oxidation anyway.

This is pretty awesome.

CAPS LOCK BROKEN
Feb 1, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 6 days!


Jhet posted:

As promised, my 'effort' post on making doubanjiang at home (Check the album for most of the effort). I was unable to source traditional ingredients which should be of no surprise to anyone as I'm about 7500 miles away from where the ingredients are typically grown. The biggest positives is that this is 100% gluten free, but it will really come down to the flavors. It very likely won't taste nearly the same, but if it ends up in the same ballpark for flavor profile I'll call it a success.

Temperature and humidity control are a pain while growing the mold. I ended up using my oven as a proofing box and I used bricks to control the temperature with a pan of hot water placed on top of them for evaporation.

Incidentally, if you're not used to cutting up about 2 kg of chili peppers in one sitting, your hand is likely to get sore. I didn't want to use a food processor and I didn't have anything else that would give me a decent chop. That and you have to destem them all anyway.

It smells a little yeasty right now with a hint of citrus and funk, but it's also under 1/4 inch of oil, so a lot of the aroma isn't available.



Whole album here https://imgur.com/a/mHf1j

Next summer I'm considering making soy sauce, because most of the GF ones out there are a little thin on flavor when most of the flavor should be coming from the soy beans and fermentation/oxidation anyway.

That is cool as gently caress

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Stuparoni posted:

A cast iron skillet preheated in the oven can do some pretty serious stir-fry.
There's nothing magic about using an oven to preheat a skillet unless you have an unusually lovely range. For most people with typical residential-quality kitchen appliances the oven won't go over 500 or maybe 550 (without fuckery), while most ranges (except some modern ones that monitor the temperature of the cooking surface) will happily heat a pan much higher.

Like if you're running your oven anyway it won't hurt to use it to preheat a skillet. Or if you have a fire alarm you can't silence that goes off whenever you heat a skillet on the stove. But if you're trying to get your skillet as hot as you can loving get it for stir-fry, for most people using their range and being patient is going to work better than using the oven.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Peven Stan posted:

That is cool as gently caress

Thanks. I just hope it tastes as good as I hope it will. Smells were good, and while they were obnoxious to my wife during the part where I was growing the mold, it never smelled off. Really not that much work considering how long it might last. I'm going to end up giving away plenty too.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


looks good todd

How do you know it's the correct mold? I've never tried anything like this.

It should be real zippy, Thai chilies are a lot hotter than the normal Sichuan chili peppers.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Grand Fromage posted:

looks good todd

How do you know it's the correct mold? I've never tried anything like this.

It should be real zippy, Thai chilies are a lot hotter than the normal Sichuan chili peppers.

Research mostly. Aspergilus oryzae is used in sake making and other cooking applications. The pack of rice covered in A. oryzae can also be used to simulate dry aging beef, and a few other things that I haven't tried yet. If I were trying to wild capture the correct mold from just leaving it out I would likely have run into issues as I'm not sure it's available currently in my kitchen biome. So sourcing it from a Japanese source ensures it's pure enough for what I needed. You can also buy it in powdered format to use in sake making, but as it spores, just mixing a bunch of rice with active mold is enough to propagate the right species.

Then you can just keep an eye on it. If it smells good and stays white and then yellow as you dry it out it's just fine. Funky smells are good, rotting smells are not. You will have other stuff join the party, but they'll be out competed by the one you used to begin.

I adjusted the recipe for the chilies. I ended up using about a triple batch of the beans to a double batch of the chilies. I used some of the fresh ones in some other dishes to gauge intensity. The citrus brightness of the Thai chilies is going to be one of the biggest differences, at least that I can expect.

pahuyuth
Nov 10, 2002

I can destroy you


Ok everyone, please help me with my lifelong quest to make Perfect Restaurant Style Tofu. You guys know what I'm talkin' 'bout... those nice little triangles of perfectly fried tofu... crispy and relatively thick crust, with a nice pillow soft interior. My favorite cheap local "Chinese" restaurant does it just right but goddamn I cannot make it the same way and I've been trying off and on for drat near 25 years now.

Stuff I've tried, singly and in various combinations:

Freezing the tofu
Pressing out as much water as I can
Soaking in salt water then pressing
Various oils when stir frying - coconut, peanut, vegetable
Deep frying in peanut oil
Buying pre-fried tofu from an Asian grocer
Using various combos of flour and/or corn starch


I never get the crust right, which seems to be the key part.

he;lp

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

If you've been trying for that long with no success wouldn't it be better to just ask the restaurant people

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CAPS LOCK BROKEN
Feb 1, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 6 days!


pahuyuth posted:

Ok everyone, please help me with my lifelong quest to make Perfect Restaurant Style Tofu. You guys know what I'm talkin' 'bout... those nice little triangles of perfectly fried tofu... crispy and relatively thick crust, with a nice pillow soft interior. My favorite cheap local "Chinese" restaurant does it just right but goddamn I cannot make it the same way and I've been trying off and on for drat near 25 years now.

Stuff I've tried, singly and in various combinations:

Freezing the tofu
Pressing out as much water as I can
Soaking in salt water then pressing
Various oils when stir frying - coconut, peanut, vegetable
Deep frying in peanut oil
Buying pre-fried tofu from an Asian grocer
Using various combos of flour and/or corn starch


I never get the crust right, which seems to be the key part.

he;lp

Have you tried potato starch? It's what I use for agedashi tofu

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