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GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



PorkFat posted:

Thanks, I'll look harder for a bamboo brush the next time I go to the city. I can't find one around here and I'm not going to spend $10 on Amazon. I had one before with another wok, which is the wok I used the oil-only method of seasoning. And yeah, it did bead up and have little blobs on it like you said. I should have kept it but my drat room mate put it in the dishwasher when I was out of town. Did the same thing with my Lodge skillet because "it was greasy looking."

Oh yeah. That's a point I forgot to mention, thanks. I'll put it in the op. "don't use soap or put in dishwasher."

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Myron Baloney
Mar 19, 2002



Dinosaur Gum

kuskus posted:

Here's a PDF converted from iChm on OS X.
Holy poo poo thanks I remember wanting this and being bummed that I missed my chance to save it!

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

Fun Shoe

Do you know any way to come close to replicating the basic brown sauce that comes in most takeout Chinese food, such as beef with broccoli? I've tried recreating it before and come pretty close, mostly I used beef stock, oyster sauce, soy sauce and some sugar/salt/MSG.

If so man this would make my life significantly less expensive because I am what is known as an addict, and my local takeout place is not even very good.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Stalizard posted:

Do you know any way to come close to replicating the basic brown sauce that comes in most takeout Chinese food, such as beef with broccoli? I've tried recreating it before and come pretty close, mostly I used beef stock, oyster sauce, soy sauce and some sugar/salt/MSG.

If so man this would make my life significantly less expensive because I am what is known as an addict, and my local takeout place is not even very good.

It's just oyster sauce, light and dark soy, sugar, Shaoxing wine, corn starch, white pepper, sesame oil. If you can't get it to taste right, the thing you might actually be perceiving as missing is the flavor of "wok hei."

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Is it possible to get a proper wok pan that works with an electric stove?

MullardEL34
Sep 30, 2008

Basking in the cathode glow

mindphlux posted:

Sorry, didn't realize. I think turkey fryers are the go-to portable wok burners. The gas is pretty reasonably priced, and you can usually pick one up for about 40-50 either online or at target or something. Pretty sound investment, they're also great for frying a bunch of stuff without stinking up your kitchen.

I actually use a Coleman Dual Fuel camp stove as a wok burner. It Runs on unleaded gasoline and gets ungodly hot if maintained properly and kept clean. Plus it folds up and stores away in a neat little briefcase like contraption. I stir-fry out on the screened in porch, which keeps the house from reeking for days.

MullardEL34 fucked around with this message at Apr 6, 2011 around 06:55

AriTheDog
Jul 29, 2003
Famously tasty.

branedotorg posted:

I prefer Fuchsia Dunlop's Shark's Fin and Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet-Sour Memoir of Eating in China (but it's a memoir with recipes rather than a cook book, great for background) to Land Of Plenty but either are excellent.

Shark's Fin and Sichuan Pepper is an entertaining read, if not a great book, but there are only a handful of recipes in it.

Great pics in this thread, Gravity84. I saw you posting in the SF restaurants thread, and if you end up in the area, check out Sichuan Fusion in El Cerrito. It's really fantastic, even for non Sichuan dishes.

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003

This Red Text Is Brought To You By The Fact That Paul Stastny Had To Go To FUCKING WINNIPEG To Get A Shot At A Stanley Cup.

P.S. Missouri is full of nothing but meth and so am I.


Fun Shoe

His Divine Shadow posted:

Is it possible to get a proper wok pan that works with an electric stove?

Just get a normal wok and a wok rink, it works very well (temp control just isn't as good). Martin Yan does most of his cooking on an electric range.

gret
Dec 12, 2005

goggle-eyed freak



bewbies posted:

Just get a normal wok and a wok rink, it works very well (temp control just isn't as good). Martin Yan does most of his cooking on an electric range.

I'd just get a flat-bottomed wok. That way you're not losing any heat by not having the wok directly contact the range surface.

ForkPat
Aug 5, 2003

All the food is poison


gret posted:

I'd just get a flat-bottomed wok. That way you're not losing any heat by not having the wok directly contact the range surface.

If you did use a ring - regardless of gas or electric - make drat sure it's a steel wire ring and not the ones made of sheet metal with round holes punched out. The sheet metal ones will trap heat and destroy the enamel on the stove top. If you have a glass top, you're out of luck - get an outdoor burner.

Now, it's not nearly as hot as it should be to achieve the "wok hei", but a cheap Korean butane stove like this http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xpE1FpQmW...00/DSCN1644.JPG can get you by until you can get your hands on a more powerful heat source. The butane cans go for like $3 at the Asian market.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



PorkFat posted:

If you did use a ring - regardless of gas or electric - make drat sure it's a steel wire ring and not the ones made of sheet metal with round holes punched out. The sheet metal ones will trap heat and destroy the enamel on the stove top. If you have a glass top, you're out of luck - get an outdoor burner.

Now, it's not nearly as hot as it should be to achieve the "wok hei", but a cheap Korean butane stove like this http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xpE1FpQmW...00/DSCN1644.JPG can get you by until you can get your hands on a more powerful heat source. The butane cans go for like $3 at the Asian market.

Yeah, I've seen those shabu shabu burners at Asian markets, they're usually about 25bux give or take. IMO people are better served spending the extra and getting FGM's suggestion. Especially if you already have a LP tank for a grill.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Yeah, if you're not gonna get wok hei from a cheapo butane stove, you're sure as poo poo not gonna get it from an electric range and a wok ring. I am really tempted to get the 185,000 BTU burner for 35 bux and also use it for brewing beer.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Pork and Shrimp Shumai


The ubiquitous dim sum dumpling. Usually made with pork, shrimp, and mushrooms, you sometimes see it made from beef or chicken, though it's not very common, and not as good IMO. I usually use store bought wonton wrappers, but I have pretty recently acquired a pasta roller so I hope to update this recipe so that you can make it completely from scratch. I'm no master dim sum maker, this is just (roughly) how I do it. I'd love suggestions if any of you know ways to improve it.

Save your shrimp shells and mushroom stems for stock.

Ingredients:
Wonton or gyoza wrappers, square or circle, doesn't really matter
1 lb ground pork, not too lean
1/4 lb shrimp, any size, shelled, deveined, rough chopped in to small pieces, about .5 cm
2-3 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, minced. Use fresh or rehydrated dried ones.
2 tbsp ginger, peeled, minced fine.
2 scallion, minced fine.
2 tbsp light soy
2 tsp Shaoxing wine
2 tsp sesame oil
few dashes white pepper
1 medium egg, beaten
1 tbsp cornstarch
salt

Garnishes (optional):
flying fish roe
minced carrot
minced red pepper
peas
pretty much anything, really

Line bamboo steamer with parchment paper perforated with holes or lotus or banana leaf. Mix all ingredients but the wrappers together in a bowl. Take about 1 tbsp of the mixture and place in the middle of a wrapper. Cup the dumpling in one hand and bring edges up, pinching on either side to make the wrapper stick to the ball of filling, trying to prevent air pockets from forming. Pinch and form dumpling such that the top remains open and the filling comes just up to the top of the wrapper edge. Place in bamboo steamer, pressing bottom of dumpling on the steamer lightly to form a flat bottom. Steam for 5-10 min or until just cooked through, this will depend heavily on how much steam you can generate. Serve alone or with some garlic chili paste loosened in a bit of light soy.

GrAviTy84 fucked around with this message at Apr 7, 2011 around 00:17

Aero737
Apr 30, 2006


His Divine Shadow posted:

Is it possible to get a proper wok pan that works with an electric stove?

I use an electric stove with a flat bottomed Wok and it works great. And actually I disagree with the OP, my electric stove gets hotter than any gas range I've used. The only problem is that the heat is very localized to the bottom of the Wok where as on a wok burner you get a bit more of an even heat.

______________________________________________
Cooked Baozi tonight (Steamed Dumplings)

Dough is was just flour, yeast, a bit of salt, and water. Mixed it until firm and then let it rise for about 2 hours. Beat it down and rolled the dough into a long string and cut into little balls.

Filling was ground pork, napa cabbage, green onion, 5 spice, and ginger. Cut up the cabbage and onion add in ground pork, spices, and ginger. Stir until mixed.

Roll the dough flat, place a ball of your filling in the middle and fold the dough around the top to make a dumpling (the fold is a bit complicated and I frankly suck at it but it is just cosmetic). Let the dumpling sit for about 20 minutes to let the dough rise again, then steam on a bamboo steamer for 15-20 minutes or until cooked in the middle.

Here is a crappy video of me making a badly folded (but delicious) dumpling.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HoYM9cQirl8

This is one of my favorite foods from China, it is commonly eaten as breakfast there. Almost every restaurant will have bamboo steamers full of dumplings each morning for the morning rush.

Lrrr
Jan 17, 2010


GrAviTy84 posted:

flying fish roe

Is this just roe from any fish served out of a cannon?

The Macaroni
Dec 20, 2002
...it does nothing.

PorkFat posted:

Yeah, I think Pearl River brand is the best. As for cooking wine, I also find myself in the pit of despair with few choices in good ingredients unless I drive an hour into the city. Don't use the cooking rice wine with salt and crap in it. I mix things up by using vodka or tequila. A good tequila like 1800 gold will add a peppery note which is great in Szechuan style. Even if you have the real Shaoxing available, I recommend you try it a few times with other booze. And the OP said, sherry is a decent substitute.
I've used sherry in the past with good results, but I'm always worried that I don't go through it fast enough--I don't drink, so I'm not really the "use a couple spoonfuls for cooking then drink the rest" type. I've used sake too, didn't really work for me. One good thing about the cooking Shaoxing is that it's so loaded with crap, it can't get any worse than when it's first opened.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Westlake Beef Soup


A very popular soup from the Zhejiang Province, Westlake Soup is a type of egg drop soup. It is very light with a silky texture nuanced with cilantro and white pepper.

1/4 lb lean beef minced fine then minced finer or lean ground beef, marinated in a bit of light soy, white pepper, Shaoxing, cornstarch, and a few drops of sesame oil for a few minutes.
1/4 lb silken tofu, diced into tiny cubes
2 shiitakes, fresh or rehydrated, stems removed, minced
4 water chestnuts, peeled and diced into small cubes, or a small handful of tinned water chestnuts drained and rinsed thoroughly, diced into small cubes
2 tsp ginger, peeled, minced fine or grated
Beef or chicken stock, just a basic one, doesn't need too many aromatics just simmered, skimmed, and strained water, quartered onion, peppercorns, crushed garlic and bones, or store bought. About 4-5 cups
2 eggs, beaten
Cornstarch slurry
white pepper
good handful cilantro leaves, minced
1 scallion, sliced thin

This recipe doesn't really require ludicrous heat. On modestly high heat, brown and caramelize the beef. If using ground, break up into as small chunks as you can. Add ginger and shiitakes and saute for a bit until fragrant. Add beef broth. Add water chestnuts and tofu. Bring to rapid boil. Pour in enough cornstarch slurry to thicken to a thin gravy consistency. Pour in beaten eggs in a steady stream, stirring the surface of the soup with a fork to break up the egg stream into fine ribbons of cooked egg. Add a few dashes of white pepper, the cilantro and scallions, and taste for salt. Serve.

paisleyfox
Feb 23, 2009

My dog thinks he's a pretty lady.




GrAviTy84 posted:

Westlake Beef Soup

Whelp, I know what I'm making this weekend...

Loving the thread. Does anyone have a good bao recipe?

justasmile
Aug 22, 2006

Everybody's free to feel good...

GrAviTy84 posted:

It's just oyster sauce, light and dark soy, sugar, Shaoxing wine, corn starch, white pepper, sesame oil. If you can't get it to taste right, the thing you might actually be perceiving as missing is the flavor of "wok hei."

Could you be more specific on ratios? I too would like to recreate (probably completely Americanized) sesame tofu/beef and broccoli at home.

Ziir
Nov 20, 2004

by Ozmaugh


Siew Yuk or Roast Pork


This isn't something prepared in a wok but nonetheless is one of my favorite dishes. I love how crunchy the thing is. Just by looking it up (had to figure out how to spell it) it seems there are many recipes for this, but this is the way my dad taught me.

Ingredients:
slab of pork belly w/ skin
poo poo ton of salt
white vinegar
black pepper
MSG
sugar

First we bring a pot of water to boil, big enough so that we can entirely submerge the entire slab of pork belly in water. I'd say keep it boiling for about 15-25 minutes, however long it takes to cook the entire thing.

After that, set it down skin side up and take something big and sharp and poke a ton of holes into the skin. It doesn't need to go through the meat, just get them holes in the skin. The more holes, the better. Then flip it over and cut some lines shortways into the meat. Shoot for maybe half an inch deep and lines one finger width apart or something. It's really not that important, just helps you with cutting the finished product later on.

Now that you're done cutting, take the poo poo ton of salt and rub it into the skin. The more salt, the better. Get it all over the skin and into those holes. When I'm done with the skin, I like to rub the other side with a light coat of salt too but my dad didn't do this. I like salty food, sue me. Either way, once you're done salting, get the vinegar and pour it over the skin and rub that salt off really quick.

Now hang it up somehow to dry overnight. Maybe this is unsanitary but I've never gotten sick from eating this so whatever.

The next day, make a mixture of salt/pepper/MSG. This one is really just up to you and taste. You want one teaspoon total and there should be more salt/MSG than there is pepper. Then mix it with two teaspoons of sugar. Take this and rub it over the meat, into the lines you cut, etc. Set it on a plate and saran wrap it and put it in your fridge until you're ready to cook it.

* If you order this at a restaurant, more than likely they'll have brushed red food coloring all over the skin and meat. You can do this if you want, but I think it's just a waste of time.

When you're ready to cook it, turn the oven onto the highest temperature you can make it. Once it reaches that temperature set the pork belly directly on the rack (put a tray underneath it to catch the juices) with the skin facing up. I always preferred to do this part on a toaster oven so I don't know how long it'll take with a conventional oven, so just watch the skin. It's going to start crackling and bubbling and turn really crispy at which point you're done (remember it's already cooked anyway).

Take it out and cut it up line in the picture. Remember those lines you made? Flip it onto the deliciously crunchy skin and cut with the lines then chop it up.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Ziir posted:

Siew Yuk or Roast Pork

AWESOME. Thanks for posting. The thread title was just a pun, I think this should be a thread for all kinds of Chinese foods.

ForkPat
Aug 5, 2003

All the food is poison


justasmile posted:

Could you be more specific on ratios? I too would like to recreate (probably completely Americanized) sesame tofu/beef and broccoli at home.

For extra flavor, you can marinade 12 ounces of thinly sliced (par-freezing helps when slicing) beef for one hour in:
1 Tbsp minced ginger
2 tsp soy sauce
2 tsp rice wine (I use vodka or tequila to mix things up since I can never find rice wine in this podunk town)
1.5 tsp cornstarch
1 tsp sesame oil
.5 tsp salt
pepper

Regardless of the marinade step, stir fry the beef until seared but not cooked through about 1 minute in 1 Tbsp peanut oil. Remove beef, then stir fry the 12 ounces broccoli and med sliced onion in another Tbsp peanut oil, then return the beef and add the sauce (which should be mixed ahead in a bowl to dump in all at once):

2 Tbsp of water or broth
2 Tbsp oyster sauce
2 tsp dark soy sauce
1 Tbsp rice wine

Stiry fry 30 seconds or so until beef is done. The book I got this from has you parboil the broccoli but I don't find it necessary. She also has you lightly stir fry some garlic and fermented black beans a little bit before pulling them to the side and adding the beef. You may need to increase the stir fry times if you don't have a high-temp heat source like my outdoor wok burner.

ForkPat fucked around with this message at Jan 4, 2012 around 06:11

Lord Zedd-Repulsa
Jul 21, 2007

Devour a good book.



Is there any good substitute for sesame oil if we're allergic? I can manage simple stir fries at home with just canola oil, but it seems like everything else requires sesame and I'd rather not eat tasty food only to end up grabbing my Epi-Pen afterwards.

ScottyD
Jan 17, 2002

by angerbeet


Ziir posted:

Siew Yuk or Roast Pork

Someone here posted a recipe for this years ago that looked awesome too, it involved brushing vodka onto the skin and had the most amazing cracklin on the top. Yours looks totally awesome, but if anyone remembers and has the recipe I'm talking about, please post it! Not on goonswithspoons.com as far as I can see!

ForkPat
Aug 5, 2003

All the food is poison


Grey Mage posted:

Is there any good substitute for sesame oil if we're allergic? I can manage simple stir fries at home with just canola oil, but it seems like everything else requires sesame and I'd rather not eat tasty food only to end up grabbing my Epi-Pen afterwards.

There's really nothing that you can use instead. Sesame oil has such a distinctive flavor. Maybe dry roast some cashews or peanuts until they get fairly dark but not burnt (hopefully you're not allergic to nuts too). Finely crush them up and mix them in.

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



Grey Mage posted:

Is there any good substitute for sesame oil if we're allergic? I can manage simple stir fries at home with just canola oil, but it seems like everything else requires sesame and I'd rather not eat tasty food only to end up grabbing my Epi-Pen afterwards.

You don't use sesame oil for frying, it's a seasoning. It's by no means universal.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Red Braised Pork

This is a classic dish from Hunan Province, sometimes called "Chairman Mao's Red Braised Pork" for supposedly being his favorite dish. My mom used to make this with short ribs, though classically it is made with belly, I believe. This is a recipe based on one in Fuschia Dunlop's Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook, I don't think hers is spicy enough, so I add more chilies, also I like the taste of a bit of dark soy added during my braise.

Ingredients:
1 lb pork belly, you can also use spareribs or shoulder
2 tbsp neutral oil
2 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp Shaoxing wine
1 tbsp dark soy
1" piece fresh ginger, rough sliced
1 star anise
2 dried thai bird chilies (or more to taste, I use 4-5)
1.5" piece of cinnamon stick
light soy sauce, salt, and sugar
1 scallion, minced

Blanch pork in rapidly boiling water for about 5 min, remove and cool. Cut into bite size pieces. Heat oil in wok, add sugar, stir and caramelize until brown. Add pork, wine, soy, ginger, star anise, red chilies, cinnamon, and enough water to barely cover pork. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer, cover wok/pot and braise on low until tender (about 1.5-2 hrs). When tender, remove cover, turn heat up, and reduce liquid to a slightly viscous sauce. Should be able to slightly glaze the pork. Taste for salt and sugar. Top with minced scallions and serve.

Variations: You can add fried water chestnuts, whole roasted garlic (the picture has this), fried tofu, or bean curd skin to the last segment of cooking.

GrAviTy84 fucked around with this message at Apr 11, 2011 around 03:55

mania
Sep 9, 2004


ScottyD posted:

Someone here posted a recipe for this years ago that looked awesome too, it involved brushing vodka onto the skin and had the most amazing cracklin on the top. Yours looks totally awesome, but if anyone remembers and has the recipe I'm talking about, please post it! Not on goonswithspoons.com as far as I can see!

Here it is! I saved the entire thread to send to a friend's dad to try out.

Original thread (archives needed) - http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3127188

wei posted:



A piece of pork belly (Skin-on, this is important! Try to get something with nice layers of fat and meat.)
An oven with a broil function
Salt
Sugar
Vodka (or other neutral-tasting spirit)
Five spice powder
Garlic
Red fermented beancurd, or you can use the type preserved in chilli if you canít get the red stuff. Also known as Chinese Ďcheeseí. They usually come in glass jars, as pictured above. Theyíll be available at your local Chinese grocer. If you canít get either, itís okay to omit it.

Blowtorch or shave off any hair left on the skin, if you care about this.

I use a little wooden implement with spikes to make a shitload of puncture holes in the skin. This helps the fat render out of the skin during the roasting process, which results in a nice and even crispy crackling. If you have a tool like that with spikes, do this. This is what it looks like close up:



If not, you can score the skin both lengthwise and crosswise with a sharp knife. Make sure not to cut through the skin into the fat layer. Try to keep the distance between each score about 5-10mm.

This is a crappy picture, but the skin will look a bit like this after being punctured:



Now the next step probably goes against a lot of food safety rules, so skip it if you like. Sit the pork belly on a wire rack in the sink, and pour 1.5 litres of boiling water over the skin. This is risky because the belly has to be exposed in the fridge for 24-48 hours, and the outer edges of the belly will be partly cooked from the scalding.

While it cools, prepare the seasoning.

The following measurements are for a piece of pork belly just under 2 pounds. Combine a 1 tsp piece of fermented beancurd, 1-2 tsp five spice powder, 1.5 tsp salt and 1 tsp sugar, and 2-3 cloves of garlic, minced. Mash into a paste. I use table salt, so I'm guessing you need a bit more if you use kosher or something coarser.

If youíre not using the fermented beancurd, use an extra half teaspoon of salt. The absence of the beancurd will most likely result in the garlic burning during the roasting, and it wonít combine readily into a paste. You can omit the garlic, or use garlic powder or something. Iíve never done this without the beancurd, so Iím not sure what to do.



Wipe the belly dry with paper towels after it cools enough to handle. Score the underside of the belly about 10mm deep, like so:



Rub your paste (or dry-rub) all over the belly except the skin. Make sure to get it in the cracks on the scored underside. Itíll look like this:



Paint the skin with vodka. I think I used about 1/2 to 1 tsp. It doesnít have to be swimming in it, just a sheen of vodka will do. Sprinkle 1/2 a teaspoon of salt on the skin and pop the belly into the fridge for 24-48 hours. Be sure to keep the belly elevated on a small rack or something, so the vodka doesnít soak the underside of the belly. Youíll need to leave the belly exposed, so I hope your fridge has nothing nasty in it. Once or twice during the refrigeration period, say about 12 hours apart, paint another layer of vodka and sprinkle more salt on the skin.

The salt draws out moisture from the skin. The vodka is supposed to denature the skin or something, which also contributes to the formation of bubbly crackling. I donít know the science behind it so Iím not going to go into that.

Traditionally, the Chinese use bicarbonate of soda or a lye water solution instead of vodka. I picked up the vodka thing on a different cooking forum, where someone experimented with 6 different solutions. He found that vodka gave the best results. Iíve done it with lye water before, which imparted a soapy flavour to the skin. Iíve also done it without applying anything to the skin, and the skin was still hard and not crispy in some places.

After a day or two the skin will be dry and hard to the touch, and the salt on the skin should have dissolved. The vodka will have evaporated.

Preheat oven to 160-170C. Place the belly on a rack in a roasting tray, then pop it in the middle rack of the oven for an hour. Most people would roast at a higher temperature for a shorter period of time, but I find the slow roasting results in a better crackling (more time to render the fat on the skin). Use a thermometer if you have one, Iíd take it to medium or medium-well.

Youíll get something that looks like this after an hour. Pay no heed to the extra skins in the background, theyíre rogue skins from a pork shoulder.



Wipe as much liquid fat off the surface of the skin as possible, using a paper towel. This is especially important if you have a pool of fat on the surface, as it will prevent the crackling from forming. Now turn the broiler on, and broil until the skin until it looks like this, about 5 minutes:



If you havenít done this before and your oven window is clean enough to see through (clean it you filthy goon), watch the belly skin bubble up as you broil it. It should start bubbling up almost instantly, itís pretty fun to watch them form. If you like bubbles, that is.

Broil until there are bubbles all over the surface, but stop if nothing else forms after about 5 minutes, or youíll burn it. If youíre an idiot like me and got distracted by the telly during the broiling, scrape and dust off any black bits on the crackling.

Let it rest for about 15-20 minutes, then chop to the size of your liking. I find it easier to slice it from the bottom (skin side down), because the crackling shatters very easily.

While it rests, cook up a quick veggie stir-fry. Serve on plain white rice, with stir-fried veggies of your choice.





Feel free to change the seasonings as you wish. Mine might be a little too salty for some palates. If you google a bit youíll find that most people have their own recipe. I havenít tried it myself but you should be able to skip the scalding step. Between the puncturing/scoring, drying out the skin in the fridge and vodka/salt treatment of the skin, the crackling should still be decent.

Bo-Pepper
Sep 9, 2002

Want some rye?
Course ya do!



Fun Shoe

Unnh. I want to have carnal relations with all of that.

ScottyD
Jan 17, 2002

by angerbeet


mania posted:

Here it is! I saved the entire thread to send to a friend's dad to try out.

Original thread (archives needed) - http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3127188

YESSSSSSSSSSS THANK YOU LOOK AT THAT loving SKIN DUDE

Jay Carney
Mar 23, 2007

If you do that you will die on the toilet.


Holy poo poo that is gorgeous.

Serendipitaet
Apr 19, 2009


This thread is a great inspiration.

You rated this thread '5'! Great job, go wok wild.

Bo-Pepper
Sep 9, 2002

Want some rye?
Course ya do!



Fun Shoe

GrAviTy84 posted:

Pork and Shrimp Shumai


I was thinking of trying this today. Should my supermarket not have ground pork, what kind of pork would folks suggest I whack in my food processor to get the desired result?

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003

This Red Text Is Brought To You By The Fact That Paul Stastny Had To Go To FUCKING WINNIPEG To Get A Shot At A Stanley Cup.

P.S. Missouri is full of nothing but meth and so am I.


Fun Shoe

Did a couple of Chinese dishes this weekend that turned out really well. First was a pork stir fry with red bell peppers, baby bok choi and scallions using all of the "standard" ingredients, was really awesome. Next was an "orange beef" dish with deep fried beef top round, a sauce with some orange juice, and broccoli. Both were awesome. Thank you thread!

Is that roast pork recipe from earlier the same thing as the delicious red BBQ pork you find at restaurants? If so I may try that next.

indoflaven
Dec 10, 2009


Bo-Pepper posted:

I was thinking of trying this today. Should my supermarket not have ground pork, what kind of pork would folks suggest I whack in my food processor to get the desired result?

Boneless country-style ribs work better than ground pork. You can ground half to a course texture and half to a finer texture.

edit: Also Cook's Illustrated throws 1/2 of a teaspoon of powdered gelatin into 2 tablespoons of soy sauce for 5 minutes before adding to the filling to help keep it juicy.

indoflaven fucked around with this message at Apr 11, 2011 around 19:07

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



bewbies posted:

Is that roast pork recipe from earlier the same thing as the delicious red BBQ pork you find at restaurants? If so I may try that next.

No, you are thinking of char siu pork, which is usually pork shoulder, glazed in a mix of soy, hoisin, five spice, honey and/or maltose. The two roast pork (siu/siew is a phonetic spelling) recipes are for siew yuk which isn't as heavily seasoned as char siu, isn't sweet, and has the added factor of crispy crunchy skin.

char siu is good, but well made siew yuk is better IMO.

edit: Visual aid

This is a typical window at a Cantonese "deli"
upper left is roast duck, right down the middle is char siu, far right is the siew yuk. Other things, too, some poultry leg quarters on the bottom, cuttlefish, sausage, can't really tell the specifics about the other stuff because of the white balancing.


far left lightly seasoned steamed chicken
next over is a soy glazed steamed chicken
then sausages
scallions, for some reason
roast duck
char siu
The siu yuk is probably over a bit more, they can be quite big.

GrAviTy84 fucked around with this message at Apr 11, 2011 around 19:43

Bo-Pepper
Sep 9, 2002

Want some rye?
Course ya do!



Fun Shoe

indoflaven posted:

Boneless country-style ribs work better than ground pork. You can ground half to a course texture and half to a finer texture.

edit: Also Cook's Illustrated throws 1/2 of a teaspoon of powdered gelatin into 2 tablespoons of soy sauce for 5 minutes before adding to the filling to help keep it juicy.

I ended up grabbing ground pork I was surprised to see at the store before I saw this. I'll keep it in mind for another day.

DeNofa
Aug 25, 2009

WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING IN LIFE.

If anyone's looking for cheap out-door burner solutions, the smaller Asian market (out of the three or four) near me have about half a dozen of them for pretty cheap. I'd recommend looking for a place like that rather than dishing out a bit more at a sporting goods place or online.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Spicy Fish and Bean Curd Stick in Claypot


This is kind of a mashup of regional styles, but I really like it.

Ingredients:
3/4 lb firm white fleshed fish, I like rock cod, sliced into 1/2 inch thick slices, marinated in a bit of Shaoxing wine, salt, and cornstarch (cornstarch optional, skip if you don't fry the fish)
1 tbsp ginger, minced fine
1 tbsp garlic, minced fine
1 scallion, sliced
dried bean curd skin, soaked in hot water for 10 min
4 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed
3 leaves nappa cabbage, sliced into 1/2 inch ribbons
light soy, to taste
sugar, to taste
cilantro leaves
corn starch slurry

Sauce:
2 cups basic broth, chicken or pork bone, or fish scraps simmered in water with a piece of crushed ginger and a few rough chopped scallions
1 heaping tablespoon Sichuan hot bean paste, or a few fermented black beans, lightly crushed/mashed in 1 tbsp of garlic chili sauce, loosened with a bit of dark soy and sesame oil.
1 tsp dark soy
chili oil, to taste
dash white pepper

(Optional) Fry fish in hot wok with 1/2 cup of oil until medium. Reserve.

Submerge clay pot in water for at least 15 min. In clay pot, heat about a tbsp of oil. Add garlic and ginger, saute until aromatic. Add sauce, mushrooms, and bean curd skin. Bring to a boil, taste for seasoning, adding light soy or sugar as necessary. Add nappa cabbage, cook through, add fish, heat through. Take care to stir gently after you add the fish, you don't want to obliterate the delicate meat. Add cornstarch slurry, enough to thicken to a medium thin gravy, stir through and bring back to a boil. Top with sliced scallions and cilantro leaves.

GrAviTy84 fucked around with this message at Apr 11, 2011 around 22:11

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GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Lo Bak Go (Turnip cake)



Often improperly named: "turnip cake," this dim sum dish is actually made with radishes, daikon to be specific. The cake is laced with bits of Chinese bacon, ham, or sausage, dried shrimp, shiitake mushrooms, and often scallions, and is steamed, then pan fried before serving.

1 large daikon radish (~2 lbs give or take), peeled, and run through the big holes in a box grater, or through your food processor's grating attachment.
6 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, diced. If using dried, reserve liquid.
1/2 cup small dried shrimp, rough chopped, soaked in a bit of water. Just put them on your cutting board and make a few rocking passes with a cleaver.
equal amount of Chinese bacon, minced. You can also use Chinese preserved ham or sausage, but bacon is best.
2 scallions, sliced
1 tbsp Shaoxing wine
2.5 cups rice flour, NOT glutinous rice flour
salt
1 tsp sugar
water

In a big pot, add daikon and about a quart of water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cook until tender, about 20-30 min. Drain and reserve both cooking liquid and grated daikon. Saute bacon in a pan until browned, add shrimp + liquid, and mushrooms and brown. Add to daikon along with Shaoxing, sugar, salt, and rice flour. Stir to combine. Add enough of the daikon cooking liquid to give the mixture a tapioca/rice pudding texture. Put mixture in a greased loaf pan. Place loaf pan in a pot of boiling water, cover, and steam for an hour. Remove loaf pan, cool, and chill over night in fridge. Run a butter knife along the edge of the loaf pan. Invert the loaf onto a cutting board and slice into 3/4" thick slices with a sharp knife and a slow and steady slicing motion. Fry in a pan on medium with some oil, flipping occasionally, until both sides are browned. I like to use a nonstick skillet for this last step. Serve topped with some sliced scallions and with some light soy and chili oil.

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