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al-azad
May 28, 2009



I have this massive bag of dried red chilis going to waste. Give me your best hot chili oil recipes.

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emotive
Dec 26, 2006



al-azad posted:

I have this massive bag of dried red chilis going to waste. Give me your best hot chili oil recipes.

This one has been my go-to the few times I've made it:
http://thewoksoflife.com/2015/08/how-to-make-chili-oil/

I'm assuming you can do it with regular dried chilis, just blitz them in a food processor first.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


I like to lightly toast them in a pan, add oil and blend with hand blender, and let the oil sit in the fridge for a few days, shaking it up whenever I think of it. When it's been four days or whatever, I set it to strain through a coffee filter in the fridge (this also takes a few days and the filter needs to be swapped out occasionally) . This makes a really nice looking oil with a clean, toasted flavor.

I've made the one posted above and I'm always reaching for the one with just chilies instead.

There Bias Two
Jan 13, 2009

Chakh'mah Mush'lam Echad Rak

Human Tornada posted:

I like to lightly toast them in a pan, add oil and blend with hand blender, and let the oil sit in the fridge for a few days, shaking it up whenever I think of it. When it's been four days or whatever, I set it to strain through a coffee filter in the fridge (this also takes a few days and the filter needs to be swapped out occasionally) . This makes a really nice looking oil with a clean, toasted flavor.

At first I thought I clicked on the coffee thread and was really, really confused.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Human Tornada posted:

I like to lightly toast them in a pan, add oil and blend with hand blender, and let the oil sit in the fridge for a few days, shaking it up whenever I think of it. When it's been four days or whatever, I set it to strain through a coffee filter in the fridge (this also takes a few days and the filter needs to be swapped out occasionally) . This makes a really nice looking oil with a clean, toasted flavor.

I've made the one posted above and I'm always reaching for the one with just chilies instead.

So you're creating an oil infusion rather than oil with a clump of chilies floating around?

Hell, I'll make both. Got like a 2lb bag of this stuff.

canoshiz
Nov 6, 2005

THANK GOD FOR THE SMOKE MACHINE!

al-azad posted:

I have this massive bag of dried red chilis going to waste. Give me your best hot chili oil recipes.

I don't know if it's been linked here already but this guy's Youtube channel is fantastic and I saw a recipe for chili oil there recently:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrXPNq3QdfY

He's a white dude in China married to a Chinese woman living in China and also might have some kind of culinary background? In any case his recipe videos and writeups are detailed and really interesting for non-Chinese speakers like myself

al-azad
May 28, 2009



emotive posted:

This one has been my go-to the few times I've made it:
http://thewoksoflife.com/2015/08/how-to-make-chili-oil/

I'm assuming you can do it with regular dried chilis, just blitz them in a food processor first.

I made this over the weekend and it turned out well. Tested it out this morning in a very boring way by frying up eggs and mushrooms. I think I will use this as a base for cooking more than a table condiment.


Human Tornada posted:

I like to lightly toast them in a pan, add oil and blend with hand blender, and let the oil sit in the fridge for a few days, shaking it up whenever I think of it. When it's been four days or whatever, I set it to strain through a coffee filter in the fridge (this also takes a few days and the filter needs to be swapped out occasionally) . This makes a really nice looking oil with a clean, toasted flavor.

I've made the one posted above and I'm always reaching for the one with just chilies instead.

Have this steeping in the fridge. Toasted the dried peppers with the windows closed like an idiot and was forced to leave my kitchen in a coughing fit. Learn from me.

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002
I LOVE MY ASSAULT RIFLE 15 WITH ITS HIGH CAPACITY CLIP/MAGAZINE


Gravy Boat 2k

I made fuscia dunlop's yuxiang eggplant and that poo poo is right.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


hakimashou posted:

I made fuscia dunlop's yuxiang eggplant and that poo poo is right.

It is right as hell. Now I want some.

large hands
Jan 24, 2006


hakimashou posted:

I made fuscia dunlop's yuxiang eggplant and that poo poo is right.

Just made her fish fragrant pork slivers and they were really good, I'll have to try that. My only issue is that I think the pork chops I used were too lean, so they wound up a little dry. Might try a fattier cut next time.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

hakimashou posted:

I made fuscia dunlop's yuxiang eggplant and that poo poo is right.
I know, right? Her cookbook Every Grain of Rice has a ton of awesome stuff.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


I made Danny Bowen's Mapo Tofu from his book (this version) and I was skeptical at first but it turned out really good. Really deep umami flavor and was more complex than more traditional recipes but didn't stray too far out there that it wasn't Mapo Tofu anymore.

That being said, I would tweak a few things to suit my personal tastes. Use more tofu and less pork, the pork combined with the chopped mushrooms makes it really meaty. I'll also use silken tofu next time, and double the Sichuan peppercorns, as it was a little light on the numbing.

Overall I was pretty happy with it though and it might be my new standard recipe.




al-azad posted:

I made this over the weekend and it turned out well. Tested it out this morning in a very boring way by frying up eggs and mushrooms. I think I will use this as a base for cooking more than a table condiment.


Have this steeping in the fridge. Toasted the dried peppers with the windows closed like an idiot and was forced to leave my kitchen in a coughing fit. Learn from me.

Well, how'd it turn out?

CAPS LOCK BROKEN
Feb 1, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 7 days!


Christ that is a complicated recipe, typical of someone who isnít Chinese to try and overengineer mapo tofu

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Peven Stan posted:

Christ that is a complicated recipe, typical of someone who isnít Chinese to try and overengineer mapo tofu

Dang, no kidding.

quote:

Ingredients:
Base
2 ounces dried whole shiitake mushrooms
3 cups very hot water
1/3 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup doubanjiang (spicy bean paste)
1/3 cup tomato paste
Braise
1/2 cup chili oil, or as needed
15 garlic cloves, minced - HOW MUCH?!
1/4 cup fermented black beans
1/3 cup Chili Crisp
1 (12-ounce) bottle cheap beer
2 teaspoons mushroom powder
1 teaspoon toasted and ground
Sichuan peppercorns
1 (15-ounce) package firm tofu, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 teaspoon cornstarch slurry
Soy sauce
+ginger

Sichuan peppercorn oil, for drizzling
Ground Sichuan pepper
Several sprigs fresh cilantro, chopped
1 or 2 scallions, trimmed and sliced
Steamed rice
+sesame oil

My recipe. I mean, the key ingredients are there and the extra ingredients aren't crazy (mushroom is pretty good for umami) but some things seem super... foodie-try-hard like the beer.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


Did you guys miss the part where I said I was skeptical at first but it won me over? What's wrong with trying a new approach every once and a while?

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


I never said I think it would be bad, but just that it's a lot busier than a "normal" recipe.

I have no doubt that adding things full of umami (mushrooms, tomato paste) would improve the flavor.

marshalljim
Mar 6, 2013


Whoa, some chef somewhere elaborated a bit on a traditional recipe? Those drat non-Chinese.

emotive
Dec 26, 2006



Does the ingredient to tofu ratio seem insane to anyone else?

A full 1/2 cup of doubanjiang and chili oil for one package of tofu?

large hands
Jan 24, 2006


emotive posted:

Does the ingredient to tofu ratio seem insane to anyone else?

A full 1/2 cup of doubanjiang and chili oil for one package of tofu?

and 1/4 cup of fermented black beans and 13 cloves of garlic and 13oz of chickencheese

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


marshalljim posted:

Whoa, some chef somewhere elaborated a bit on a traditional recipe? Those drat non-Chinese.

No one said it's verboten, relax. It's just so funnily typical to truss up simple, staple recipes to make it seem fancy, as if traditional recipes are too pedestrian for such a high-class restaurant. In this case, the result was good, so that's great, but it still plays into the stereotype.

Amergin
Jan 29, 2013

THE SOUND A WET FART MAKES


I mean it's mapo dofu, there is no "traditional" way to cook it. The traditional way is however your ayi makes it with whatever she has on hand. I mean hell adding chili crisp to everything is totally a thing here in Yunnan.

I'm personally planning on trying out some of those changes. Throwing some beer into it sounds interesting.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

I'm rude now.


Also, it's the fukkin Mission Chinese Cookbook, which is off the wall food that isn't claiming ~~~authenticity~~~ in the first place.

CAPS LOCK BROKEN
Feb 1, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 7 days!


The tomato paste, beer, and mushroom powder is just hilarious. Might as well simmer it in dashi stock while you're at it.

emotive
Dec 26, 2006



Everyone should keep in mind Danny Bowen is the same dude that puts beef jerky and potato chips in his fried rice.

Jeoh
Jul 20, 2010



totalnewbie posted:

I never said I think it would be bad, but just that it's a lot busier than a "normal" recipe.

I have no doubt that adding things full of umami (mushrooms, tomato paste) would improve the flavor.

Kenji's vegan mapo tofu recipe uses a lot of mushrooms too for the umami and as a meat replacement. It's pretty good.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


totalnewbie posted:

No one said it's verboten, relax. It's just so funnily typical to truss up simple, staple recipes to make it seem fancy, as if traditional recipes are too pedestrian for such a high-class restaurant. In this case, the result was good, so that's great, but it still plays into the stereotype.

Then what the gently caress are you even doing here if the idea of modifying an old recipe is "LOL typical"? Adding a 90 cent can of beer isn't exactly truffle oil and salmon foam.


Peven Stan posted:

The tomato paste, beer, and mushroom powder is just hilarious. Might as well simmer it in dashi stock while you're at it.

Yeah, then it might taste even better. The horror!

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Human Tornada posted:

Then what the gently caress are you even doing here if the idea of modifying an old recipe is "LOL typical"? Adding a 90 cent can of beer isn't exactly truffle oil and salmon foam.

Man, you need to relax. It's an internet forum, not a NYT review.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


totalnewbie posted:

Man, you need to relax. It's an internet forum, not a NYT review.

Hey I'm not the one who reads food and recipe forums just to about "typical foodie bullshit".

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


emotive posted:

Does the ingredient to tofu ratio seem insane to anyone else?

A full 1/2 cup of doubanjiang and chili oil for one package of tofu?

That sounds about normal for mapo tofu here in Chengdu.

I have never seen as much variation in a single dish as in mapo tofu. It involves tofu, that's the only thing I can tell you for sure. It's totally different everywhere I get it.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Human Tornada posted:

Hey I'm not the one who reads food and recipe forums just to about "typical foodie bullshit".

I think you've got your and confused. But hey whatever, it turned out well for you, good for you.

Jeoh
Jul 20, 2010



Grand Fromage posted:

That sounds about normal for mapo tofu here in Chengdu.

I have never seen as much variation in a single dish as in mapo tofu. It involves tofu, that's the only thing I can tell you for sure. It's totally different everywhere I get it.

There should be tofu and Sichuan peppercorns. Doubanjiang too, usually. Otherwise the sky's the limit.

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



Yah as someone who has lived in Chengdu for 5 years, there is basically no set recipe or standard for Mapo tofu. It's basically a totally different dish at every restaurant you go to.

Tofu and sichuan peppercorns are basically the only two constants.

Go hog wild.

e: Other dishes like kung pao chicken, though, you get chefs having fights over. There's a big divide here in Sichuan about whether it's OK to add green bamboo to the dish (among other things) or not and it's extremely contentious and I have heard screaming over it.

Pookah
Aug 21, 2008

Caw





hakimashou posted:

I made fuscia dunlop's yuxiang eggplant and that poo poo is right.

Made this for the first time for my newly vegetarian parents and it was a great big hit.

10/10. Will fragrantly fish that eggplant in future.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


Closed-minded weiners ignore this post...

I made Danny Bowien's Kung Pao Pastrami also from his book (I can't find the same version online). Not what I'd use to scratch a Kung Pao itch but it was still really good, more of a pastrami and peanut stir fry. Maybe a splash of black vinegar would bring it a little closer next time.

The potatoes and fresh jalapenos provided a nice soft contrast to the crunchy celery and peanuts and meaty pastrami and I'll probably incorporate them into more traditional Kung Pao recipes from now on.

The real revelation was the pastrami, though. The recipe calls for you to grill it first and then bake it but for logistical reasons I couldn't do that so I sous-vided it and then finished it under the broiler but still used his spice mixture (salt, sugar, black pepper, Sichuan peppercorns, and yellow mustard) and it was unreal. I probably ate half of the point-cut brisket just off the cutting board.

feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008




So I hit up my local Chinese supermarket and picked up something called 'dried Xiao mi chili'. Anyone know what this is, other than obviously dried hot peppers? Google suggests Xiao mi translates as 'millet' or alternatively 'cellphone manufacturer'

There Bias Two
Jan 13, 2009

Chakh'mah Mush'lam Echad Rak

feedmegin posted:

So I hit up my local Chinese supermarket and picked up something called 'dried Xiao mi chili'. Anyone know what this is, other than obviously dried hot peppers? Google suggests Xiao mi translates as 'millet' or alternatively 'cellphone manufacturer'

Xiaomi is a tech company.

feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008




There Bias Two posted:

Xiaomi is a tech company.

Yes, I am aware, that's what I was getting at with the second one. I'm pretty sure they don't manufacture chilis, though.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Probably just a generic dried red chili. They don't exactly go for variety in peppers over here, I've only seen four kinds ever.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Made the Mission Chinese mapo tofu, then visited SF's Mission Chinese and ordered the mapo tofu and the kung pao pastrami. Oddly, the tofu I made at home was much better imo. The prices being incredibly high for Chinese (15 for mapo, 18 for the pastrami, rice not included) probably didn't help.

Human Tornada wasn't kidding about this stuff being meaty. Really tasty stuff but it really hosed with my mental estimate of the proper mapo tofu:rice ratio because it was so strong.

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Amergin
Jan 29, 2013

THE SOUND A WET FART MAKES


AnonSpore posted:

(15 for mapo, 18 for the pastrami, rice not included) probably didn't help.

The gently caress?

Y'all, y'all, if you ever pay >$10 for mapo dofu anywhere in the US, you are getting ripped off to the point where you just lost all face for yourself, your family, and your entire lineage front-to-back. And even $10 is a rip-off, poo poo should be like $6 at most. That's like paying $10 for... I don't know, red beans and rice. I don't give a poo poo if they put a beer in it, that beer is probably worth more than mapo dofu should ever be (and is probably better just straight up drinking).

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