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TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

I was in the Hong Kong airport for a long layover and I ate at this place and got some pretty good tofu with mushrooms. That's not why I'm posting, though. I'm trying to clear out my pantry and use up a lot of my dried goods so I'm wondering if anyone has any good recipes for tofu bamboo/dried beancurd sticks/whatever. I only have a couple recipes I like to make so more variety would be nice.

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huhwhat
Apr 22, 2010


Dried beancurd sticks are good for soaking up flavors.

I personally like using them in red braised pork belly. Dried shiitake mushrooms, light soy sauce, and five spice (cinnamon, star anise etc.) turn them into flavor bombs.

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


Laocius posted:

Does anyone have any tips for cooking with mianjin?

Well, it's not a raw product, so you just need to warm it up...in a sauce or in a stir fry for example.

If you want to google for some recipe ideas, googling for seitan probably gives you more (varied) hits.

NLJP
Aug 26, 2004




Laocius posted:

Does anyone have any tips for cooking with mianjin?

I made my own gluten the other day, just deep fried it and put it into hot and sour soup. Very good! Make smallish balls to put into the oil and at a slightly lower heat than you might expect for a bit longer. I did it at slightly too high a heat and they had a lovely crust but still a bit uncooked in the center.

Even slightly uncooked it was still great in the soup tho.

edit: oh if it's pre-cooked just chuck it into anything saucy I guess

NLJP fucked around with this message at Jun 4, 2018 around 01:17

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


I am trying to figure out what the spice mix is for shaokao. I can tell there's chili powder and cumin, and I presume salt and MSG. I think there's more going on though, and I can't decide what.

I hope shaokao isn't too vague but every shaokao I've ever had used the same spices.

Amergin
Jan 29, 2013

THE SOUND A WET FART MAKES


Grand Fromage posted:

I am trying to figure out what the spice mix is for shaokao. I can tell there's chili powder and cumin, and I presume salt and MSG. I think there's more going on though, and I can't decide what.

I hope shaokao isn't too vague but every shaokao I've ever had used the same spices.

In Kunming it was normally a base of salt + white pepper, cumin, Sichuan peppercorns, chiles, cardamom, possibly a dash of MSG and then either 5 spice or 13 spice mixes (which sometimes include more Sichuan peppercorn). It was usually pretty similar to barbecue I had elsewhere in China except maybe heavier on the Sichuan peppercorn and chiles.

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



Grand Fromage posted:

I am trying to figure out what the spice mix is for shaokao. I can tell there's chili powder and cumin, and I presume salt and MSG. I think there's more going on though, and I can't decide what.

I hope shaokao isn't too vague but every shaokao I've ever had used the same spices.

They actually sell it in stores as "shaokao seasoning". I've seen it's a mix of huajiao powder, salt, cumin, chili flakes, five spice, and pepper.

Piggy Smalls
Jun 21, 2015


Can anyone recommend a good steamer to steam dumplings?

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



You can just get a rando bamboo one like this for cheap: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01L9TJCH...ding=UTF8&psc=1

You just put them on top of a pot with boiling water and let it go.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


Does anyone know what these things are in front of the bamboo shoots here?

Linked because I'm on my phone. http://imgur.com/oa7aZbB

Amergin
Jan 29, 2013

THE SOUND A WET FART MAKES


Human Tornada posted:

Does anyone know what these things are in front of the bamboo shoots here?

Linked because I'm on my phone. http://imgur.com/oa7aZbB

Looks like it might be snow fungus but I'm not sure why they'd have it soaking rather than dried. I guess convenience?

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


Going by Google image search, I don't think that's quite right, these are solid and triangle shaped, about the size of a small chicken breast.

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Itís bamboo fungus, being long and rectangular, whereas snow fungus is more like a ball.

Bamboo fungus is a little bit softer and savory, snow fungus is chewier

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


Cool, thanks.

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



When you guys are steaming in a multi-tier steamer, do you ever worry about the heat difference between the top and bottom tiers at all or do you just let it do?

Just wondering because I noticed it seemed like my bottom tier of dumplings was getting done faster than the top one, but I dunno if that ever becomes a real issue depending on what you're steaming.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



After three years living outside China I have a real hankering for my morning baozi. Has anyone made them at home and was it worth it?

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



Yes and yes. Here's a pretty good rundown and example: https://thewoksoflife.com/2014/06/c...nger-pork-buns/
They are a fair bit of effort and take some practice to assemble right, but they save well so you can be snacking on them all week.

You can use whatever filling you want of course. The char sui pork recipe that gets posted here a lot is pretty solid, and I just made some curried beef buns yesterday actually. I really need to track down a spicy beef & pork filling recipe still, though at this point I might as well just make one myself.

You can also do whole wheat if you want to: https://thewoksoflife.com/2018/01/whole-wheat-mantou/

Hauki
May 11, 2010



Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

Yes and yes. Here's a pretty good rundown and example: https://thewoksoflife.com/2014/06/c...nger-pork-buns/
They are a fair bit of effort and take some practice to assemble right, but they save well so you can be snacking on them all week.

You can use whatever filling you want of course. The char sui pork recipe that gets posted here a lot is pretty solid, and I just made some curried beef buns yesterday actually. I really need to track down a spicy beef & pork filling recipe still, though at this point I might as well just make one myself.

You can also do whole wheat if you want to: https://thewoksoflife.com/2018/01/whole-wheat-mantou/

I shouldnít read this thread before lunchtime, because now Iím a) hungry as hell and b) craving bao zi

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Arglebargle III posted:

After three years living outside China I have a real hankering for my morning baozi. Has anyone made them at home and was it worth it?

I made a batch yesterday. They are worth it.

I like that dough in the recipe that was linked above as well. The dough for the one on GWS wiki is not really my favorite as it's very sweet and fairly oily. I do like the egg in it, but I use at most 1/4 of the sugar and oil in that dough recipe.

The freeze well if you do it prior to final cooking and they save well in the fridge for a couple days if you bake the whole batch too.

Rand Brittain
Mar 24, 2013

"Go on until you're stopped."

I did some experimental steamed buns tonight. They got really big. Like, huge big. It looks like I forgot the baking powder but I'm not sure that leaving baking powder out of things makes them bigger.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



I make a pretty good fried noodle in every respect except the noodle. I haven't been too pleased with any of the noodles I've tried off the shelf. Anyone know the right noodle for your authentic "hole in the wall with a rolling metal door and three electric bikes outside at all times" chao mian?

El Grillo
Jan 3, 2008


Fun Shoe

Need a quick answer - is Tolly Boy rice decent (or at least, not disastrously poo poo)? It's the only long grain my local Asian supermarket does. Need to do some fried rice later.

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Post a picture?

I grew up eating golden Elephant Thai long grain

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



Baozi status update. Still practicing trying to form them nicely, they tend to come out more like this most of the time:

They look derpy but they taste amazing at least! Just need to keep practicing I guess, I'm not having luck getting the tops to be "tight" like in the video and I'm guessing it's probably just down to very fine control of how you do the folds and pinches.

Speaking of, I worked out a spicy pork and beef recipe for myself (based on the carrot/ginger one from woks of life) and it turned out super good. Here's the recipe if anyone wants to try it or maybe offer some suggestions:

1 lbs ground pork
1 lbs ground beef
4 teaspoons sesame oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons peanut oil
1 teaspoon white pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cayanne
1 teaspoon chili oil

1 cup grated carrots
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
4-6 Thai chilies

1 cup scallions, chopped
2 teaspoons grated ginger
1 teaspoon shaoxing wine


It's the same gameplan to make as the ones from the Woks of Life recipe, just with adjusted ingredients. Something to note: This made like, way god drat too much filling. I filled 36 mini dumplings and only used about half the filling, so tomorrow I will make another batch of large sized ones to use the rest up. And have frozen baozi for the next month week.

So here's the one issue I had: The Thai chilies are tiny and very spicy, so you sometimes get little bites that are super spicy, and not a very even distribution. I would like to replace them with some larger and less spicy chilies that I could have a larger volume of. Any suggestion on what kind I should use?

Question 2: These are great as is, but I know there are a variety of good dipping sauces out there, can anyone recommend one I can buy or make to try with these?

Gwyrgyn Blood fucked around with this message at Jul 23, 2018 around 02:01

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Now this looks like fun.

2 ginger what

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



2 teaspoons of grated ginger, thanks for the catch.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



Now do guan tang bao where they pour soup in it before steaming.

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



I've definitely thought about doing some xiao long bao at some point way in the future once I get decent at assembling them. I've never had guan tang bao so I don't know how exactly they differ other than apparently being larger.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



The guantangbao I've had is more like a jiaozi skin but closed like baozi full of soup with a ball of filling. The way the guys running the restaurant explained it they pour soup in the top before closing.

El Grillo
Jan 3, 2008


Fun Shoe

caberham posted:

Post a picture?

I grew up eating golden Elephant Thai long grain
https://westmill.co.uk/products/tolly-boy/

Trip report: it's decent stuff.

Amergin
Jan 29, 2013

THE SOUND A WET FART MAKES


Arglebargle III posted:

The guantangbao I've had is more like a jiaozi skin but closed like baozi full of soup with a ball of filling. The way the guys running the restaurant explained it they pour soup in the top before closing.

The way my MIL does it (sort of a cheat): add water to the meat filling and mix it in until it's just before "saturated"/"not too wet". Makes it pretty easy to get pretty soupy dumplings.

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer


I just got into London so let me scout out some rice

El Grillo
Jan 3, 2008


Fun Shoe

^^please do, I'd be interested. This was just me going to the little Asian supermarket in Stratford Centre.

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Just went to china town London. The rice selections seems pretty ok.



And get this stuff



Jeoh
Jul 20, 2010



Green Little Sheep hotpot base, or bust.

caberham
Mar 18, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Jeoh posted:

Green Little Sheep hotpot base, or bust.

Thatís like 10 years ago man

Magna Kaser
Nov 4, 2004



Haha what haidilao exports their stuff?

It's not even good hot pot!!!

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Arglebargle III posted:

After three years living outside China I have a real hankering for my morning baozi. Has anyone made them at home and was it worth it?

I miss school because of how close I was to Chinatown. Breakfast was frequently lovely coffee and char siu bao and I find myself craving it from time to time.

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El Grillo
Jan 3, 2008


Fun Shoe

caberham posted:

Just went to china town London. The rice selections seems pretty ok.



And get this stuff




Nice. I thought about getting one of those big Phuoc rice bags but tbh I tend to cook more Indian-style curry as I do stir fry with rice, so I get a massive load of basmati and just use that for any stir fry that needs rice - and then the long grain I get is just for fried rice.

I've never done hot pot! But I'd loving love to. Goddamn I need to go explore some new sichuan restaurants when I next get paid. Cravings.

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