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Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Is there an affordable solution for someone with an electric range to be able to wok properly at home?

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Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


mindphlux posted:

no, not really. the difference in flavor between a rip roaring hot wok and a just sort-of-hot wok is astounding. in fact, you're probably doing yourself a huge disservice by even trying to cook with a wok on an electric range, it just doesn't make sense. instead, get a cast iron pan the size of your largest "burner", and use that. the fact that its flat and contacting all the heat source might begin to make up for the electric bit.

I'm not talking about using the electric range, I'm talking about some sort of reasonably-priced gas stove. Preferably portable.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


mindphlux posted:

Sorry, didn't realize. I think turkey fryers are the go-to portable wok burners. The gas is pretty reasonably priced, and you can usually pick one up for about 40-50 either online or at target or something. Pretty sound investment, they're also great for frying a bunch of stuff without stinking up your kitchen.

So I'd have to use it outside? I mean, I guess I could do all my prep inside and lug everything outside to cook, but it seems like a bit of a hassle.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Yeah, if you're not gonna get wok hei from a cheapo butane stove, you're sure as poo poo not gonna get it from an electric range and a wok ring. I am really tempted to get the 185,000 BTU burner for 35 bux and also use it for brewing beer.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Thoht posted:

Looks like a generic cover-our-rear end food safety label applied to a comically inappropriate product.

Bingo, I've seen the exact same label on a bunch of different things at the Chinese grocery stores I go to.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Magna Kaser posted:

heavier on the hua jiao

I see no problem here.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Grand Fromage posted:

Avoid them? My respect for your humanity has vanished.

For real. Y'all scrubs can send all unwanted hua jiao to me.

Mr. Wiggles posted:

So I'm not the only one throwing in like a quarter cup of those things every time I use them?

I even started putting them in my popcorn.

If putting it on everything is wrong, I don't want to be right. Fried chicken, eggs, rice, anything can be ma la.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


It is the best.

Speaking of regional things, there's a food truck I've seen a lot of lately that advertises 天津味煎饼 and I asked the guy what the difference was but his answer was kind of vague. So what is the difference between Tianjin style jianbing and others?

Also what is the difference between jianbing and jidanbing?

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Spuckuk posted:

I got a bottle of peppercorn oil, personally. Seems to have a much better shelf life and a teaspoon is enough to no longer feel my lips.

A tip for anyone buying this in the US and possibly other English-speaking countries: it might be rather vaguely labeled as "pepper oil" in English, so look for 花椒油 on the label to be sure you have the right stuff.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Stalizard posted:

should I just start getting intimate with a big ol daikon?



http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/02/...w-bock-gow.html

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Flaggy posted:

I am looking for a good recipe for Pad Se-Ew. Don't know if this is the correct thread or if I should go to the Indian/Curry thread.

That's Thai, and not curry.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Thoht posted:

The super thin wok is really only best when you have a monster of a burner to pair it with. So cast iron can actually be better for stir frying on lovely home ranges. Only thing is you're probably not gonna be doing a lot of flipping and tossing with it by the handle, unless you have some seriously Popeye forearms.

It'll also take longer to change temperature, but other than that it's at least as good as any other cast iron pan.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Arglebargle III posted:

I've never seen doubanjiang sold in a bag.

I buy China Famous Brand Pixian Doubanjiang and it comes in a bag. In fact, the only brand I've ever seen in a non-bag container was in a plastic tub and the only time I ever bought it, it had bits of broken glass in it.

So I'm fine decanting my bagged doubanjiang into a washed out glass jar. Douchi (fermented black beans), on the other hand, I have only ever seen in jars. I get the one with a picture of a shrimp on the label.

You want the one that says 郫县豆瓣酱 on the package, and to my knowledge it comes in a bag. Douchi is also good to have around, just not for this dish. Douchi is black with small roundish beans, doubanjiang is reddish brown with broad, flat beans.

Bertrand Hustle fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2017 around 14:07

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Magna Kaser posted:

Stuff like sichuan peppercorn are also outrageously cheap here by comparison, but I'm not sure how that falls when you go through customs.

Also lao gan ma/angry lady sauce is equally cheap, and there are 1 jillion varieties in China compared to the 1~2 most asian markets in elsewhere carry.

Do you mean the different sauces made by the company, or the zillion and one knockoff brands?

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


hakimashou posted:

I made fuscia dunlop's yuxiang eggplant and that poo poo is right.

It is right as hell. Now I want some.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Arglebargle III posted:

After three years living outside China I have a real hankering for my morning baozi. Has anyone made them at home and was it worth it?

I miss school because of how close I was to Chinatown. Breakfast was frequently lovely coffee and char siu bao and I find myself craving it from time to time.

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Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Reheated mapo is also really good on toast. Recommendation comes from a Malaysian friend who owns a restaurant.

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