Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«3 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Mithra6 posted:

Yep messing with the DNS settings on the router did it.

I swear this particular network is the most needlessly complicated network I've ever seen. It's almost as if they're configured for a multi-site enterprise, but there's only an office with 15 people. They even have have some servers in two different remote locations. No one knows why they set it up that way.

It sucks. I'm gradually simplifying all of this, but every time I take care of one tiny thing, 10 things break.

Every time I pick up a rock there is a pile of poo poo underneath. Every time I pick up that pile of poo poo there is another pile of poo poo underneath.

[Edit: Oops, thought this was the "poo poo that pisses you off" thread. Oh well, it applies to my Exchange environment as well.]

Internet Explorer fucked around with this message at Jul 27, 2011 around 19:45

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Yeah, and make sure your boss does not save an Exchange backup to your log drive.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Have you taken a look at Google Apps or Microsoft 360? With most small companies it makes sense these days to host stuff externally. Your other option would probably be Microsoft Small Business Server, of which they just recently released a new version.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

If you're talking about serious reading I've heard good things about these, have not had time to read them yet though -

http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Exc...13515615&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Exc...13515672&sr=1-1

Although, honestly, in a 200 person shop if you can make it through the first couple of pages on those you'll probably be leaps and bounds above any coworkers you may or may not have.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Wicaeed posted:

Cool, they actually already have this book on hand, I'll ask to borrow it.

Actually all of my coworkers seem extremely knowledgeable thus far. Good policies in place, people actually following them!

I'm in the twilight zone!!!

Shut up. You're just lying to try to make me feel worse.

Mierdaan posted:

Make sure your coworkers (in a foreign office) don't install WSUS on your Exchange server, sync every product Microsoft has ever made, and store the updates on your Exchange log drive!

Shut up. You're just lying to try to make me feel better.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

thebmw posted:

Can't you get a trial of that too?

If not you have a pretty long grace period, if I remember correctly. Does MSDN cover server licenses? I'd consider looking at that or a TechNet subscription. I don't know the details of what you have to meet, but I'd imagine coding an application that uses Exchange would suffice.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Studebaker Hawk posted:

FYI even though this states that Online Archives are supported with Office 2007 it neglects to mention that only certain versions of office 2007 ACTUALLY support the feature.

Just added 20K to an already sold/halfway completed project

Not that it is ideal for everyone, but can't you just use OWA to access the archived emails, or have I been misinformed?

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

SmellsOfFriendship posted:

I'm kind of an Exchange newbie and I need some help. I'm trying to restore e-mails from a backup. I've created the recovery group and I think I totally hosed up with the database. I mounted the live one and not the backup. I don't know.

According to these instructions

http://www.simple-talk.com/sysadmin...storage-groups/

I should have had a couple options but I only had the one. I'm worried because in the Mailbox Store section of the Recovery Group it lists the default public store location.

In the database locations, it has the database names under the right path. The instructions say above these should both be created but they haven't.

Am I ok? I'm really freaked out. This is on a live system.

I don't want to mount the db without knowing it won't overwrite something or whatever.

Just as a quick reply because I don't have a ton of time, you should be okay as it is pretty loving difficult to restore over a live database if the service is running. You would have had to check the box saying "this database can be overwrriten by a restore." So don't freak out, but you shouldn't really be doing this on a live server if you're an Exchange newbie.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

I think Exchange is way overkill for 10 people, most of which are part time.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Carbuncle posted:

Except they've already got Exchange proper as part of SBS2003, they're just not using it.

The way I read it was they were using the Exchange functionality in SBS2003 and he wanted to deploy a full Exchange server, but I could be wrong. I would devote my time and money elsewhere.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

That is definitely not something I have a whole lot of experience with, but if you think your mail server may be unavailable with any sort of regularity, I would allow the web host to be the MX record and pull it down from there. A lot of big companies even do stuff like that with Postini and the like. It gives you a place to spool mail if your mail server is unavailable for whatever reason (disaster recovery, etc).

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Linux Nazi posted:

I would absolutely try and sell an office of 10 people on an office 365 solution.

That would be my suggestion as well. Or Google Apps.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

It sounds like what you are referring to is a type of document management solution. In the legal field they call it "case management" because it does some extra things like you are saying, instead of just documents in a directory. It sounds like the type of thing that Sharepoint was made for, but there are probably a lot of solutions out there for architectural stuff.

As an example, I have seen software in the legal industry where you put in the "case" number, and it pulls up all the calendaring for it, documents created, documents produced, emails (the user has a button in Outlook that will import it into the case management software. It also has any metadata relevant to the case.

Sorry if that was somewhat incoherent, it's been a long week. Hopefully it is somewhat helpful.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Then I would say Sharepoint or a flat file directory is the way to go. The Public folder concept sounds crazy to me.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

LmaoTheKid posted:

Is there a way to block a user from sending email locally but allow them to send externally?

I'm setting up our new Xerox printers at the office today. We have a xerox@domain.com address that it's set up as. I know my users will start emailing documents like its candy to each other. Boss won't spring for any kind of archiving solution so it's a whole lot of fun.

However this feature is helpful as gently caress for sending documents externally.

Xerox tech told me this has to be done on the server, not the machine. Any ideas or am I just going to have to live with this?

I can't think of any easy way to do this on Exchange 2003. If it was "accept messages" instead of "send messages" that would be easy, just add delivery restrictions in the Exchange General tab for the user account.

Personally, I would never do what you're attempting to do. Actually, I have gone our of my way to make it as hard as possible for people to send things outside the office from our copiers. What happens when the person on the other end does not get it (attachment too large, etc)? Then the users come bitching to you. At least if you make them send it to themselves first and then forward it, the user gets an NDR.

If you're a smaller shop I would setup the Xerox's to scan directly to a folder in the user's home drive or something similar. Cuts down on the amount stored on the email server, and sidesteps the problem I mentioned above.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

I think you have to do that at the client level, at least I don't know of a way to do it in Exchange 2003. If you open the mailbox as that user in Outlook and then right click on the folder you can assign permissions. I think you can do it at the "mailbox" level and then do an exception with more permissions to the Inbox, but I have not tried that.

May or not be the best way, but that is how I have done it the few times I've had to.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

You shot my Apoc ;__;

You shouldn't be getting blacklisted for problems with reverse DNS entries. Some places will block for that, but as far as I know you shouldn't be put on a public blacklist. Don't quote me as I've been in that environment, but what I think you should do is direct a second external IP to the same internal IP (server) and create a separate rDNS entry for it.

Also you should just block all outbound traffic on port 25 except for your mail server.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Are you on any other Blacklists? Check here - http://mxtoolbox.com/blacklists.aspx

If not, as long as you've blocked port 25, I would just request to be taken off spamhaus again and wait and see. Have you checked your Exchange server for any weird traffic or viruses? And yeah, definitely make those changes to the IP addresses / rDNS.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Another vote for Hyena. I love it.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

ozmunkeh posted:

Our clients with Office 2007 are Small Business edition (we don't use Access), and the few Office 2010 installations are Standard edition for the same reason. We're on Exchange 2007 at the moment and I'm trying to figure out what licenses I would need to use the personal archive feature of Exchange 2010, because gently caress PSTs.
It seems that I need to upgrade everyone to Office 2010 Professional Plus in order to have it work, is that right? Also, we need both Std and Ent CALs for Exchange 2010.

One option, which I think we may end up going with, is to only allow access to archived mail through OWA. Buying all new Office licenses with Pro Plus is ridiculously expensive.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Check out Hyena.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Yes, the trial would work. While it is a good idea not to mess around with production, recovery groups are designed for exactly that. Should not really cause any problems. What version of Exchange is it? I don't know about 2007/2010, but on 2003 the type of restoring you are talking about can be a pain in the rear end, even if the database isn't corrupt.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

The only exception is Citrix / Terminal Services where you should not be using cached mode. We are pretty draconian with our email limits. The largest mailbox is 2GB and most users are set to 400MB.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Thanks for the link. Always interested in more information regarding RDS / VDI.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

I think I have seen some people mention similar things, but not exactly what I am looking for. Does anyone know of a product that helps with sharing mailboxes? Basically, we have staff that when out of the office, they want someone watching their mailbox. HR usually tells us "so and so is going to be out today, have so and so cover their email." Normally I would say use a buddy system or something but that does not really work for us. Ideally I would want something that I could give to 2-3 core HR staff so they could just click "give access to so and so until tomorrow at 5pm". Then the person would just have to use Open to see the other users Inbox, or bonus points if it uses a plugin and makes it even easier.

We have Exchange 2003 and Outlook 2003. Anyone use anything similar to what I'm talking about?

[Edit: Basically, what I think I am looking for is something that allows approved, non-IT staff the ability to grant Delegate access of an approved set of mailboxes to anyone. Bonus points if it has logging.]

Internet Explorer fucked around with this message at Mar 19, 2012 around 13:30

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

^^^

It may not be your ISP if you are using a domain registrar. You would probably go contact Godaddy / Network Solutions / whoever you got your domain name through.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Sounds like maybe you have anonymous relaying on. Google how to turn that off.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

How many items are in the Inbox / Sent / Calendar / Contacts for those users? I find a lot of times that error is due to number of emails, not size of mailbox.

Check this out -
http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange.../14/395229.aspx

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Chillbro Swaggins posted:

Not a technical question but a more human relations question (I have autism): How do I get company leadership to embrace the idea of mailbox storage limits and how do I get them to actually reduce their mailbox sizes? I can show them the numbers (how much it's costing to back up) but I feel like they won't care. There are no mailbox size limits in place at the moment.

For me, I always find RTO / RPO arguments to be the winners.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recovery_point_objective
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recovery_time_objective

If you have a huge datastore, if anything goes wrong you are looking at days of downtime, not hours (RTO). The larger the datastore, the higher chance of something going wrong. And because backups take forever, you can have a very large gap of missing emails (RPO). Granted, there are things you can do to help alleviate this type of stuff. HA Exchange, SAN Snapshots, etc.

But to simplify, I like to use an analogy that most people understand. Email is arguably the most important tool in any business today. The email server is a finely tuned machine that needs to be run properly, with regular maintenance. Say something along the lines of - I am your email server mechanic telling you that these are the things that need to be done for "properly" and "regular maintenance" to be true.

Help them implement an automated email archiving solution and the "but it's hard to deal with old emails!!!" argument will go away.

Internet Explorer fucked around with this message at Jun 25, 2012 around 14:38

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

A 200 GB database should not be taking forever to backup. Our 300GB store takes about 4 hours to do a full backup on, and that is with old LTO-3 tapes, and minimal effort into making that backup "speedy."

If all you care about is backup speed, I would start with solving that problem. Does the server have enough I/O, is it CPU starved, how are you backing it up, etc.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

EoRaptor posted:

GRT backs up each mail item as an individual record, and queries each message through exchange to do so. It's very, very slow.

Unless you need the granular restore ability, turn it off. For instance, I have it off, and instead lengthened the retention times in the exchange (2010) database to 30 days. Now, I get fast backups, and can recover email easily. for me, tapes are more disaster recovery, and much less file/item recovery (I use over provisioning and VSS for most of that stuff, much quicker and easier)

I agree that GRT may slow things down, but our backups that I quoted earlier in the thread are using GRT and they still backup at a fairly brisk pace. Although we are using BE 12.5 ad the Exchange target is Exchange 2003 on Windows 2003. Not sure if any of that would make a difference.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

cr0y posted:

Can this be done? I setup a vacation responder for an employee who is going to be gone for like a month, but i need to also forward inbound e-mail to 2 different user accounts while the vacation autoresponder is active.

Use Outlook rules to forward the messages. At least that's how I would have to do it on Exchange 2003. Not sure if you can forward to multiple addresses on 2007/2010.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Outlook does not have to stay open. There are a lot of rules that run on the Exchange server.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

madsushi posted:

This is probably a good thread for this question:

Mail filtering.

Currently we use Postini, but there's a rumor going around that they might be going the way of the dodo. We're trying to find a good option that provides inbound/outbound filtering, is located in the cloud, and has perks (like outbound encryption, etc). A major required feature would be the ability to host multiple domains/customers underneath one account. We have heard of a good solution, MX Logic, but I wanted to see if anyone has any good/bad experiences with MX Logic or if there's another service they'd recommend.

Thanks!

It's not a rumor.
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57...to-google-apps/

I have heard great things about Mimecast, but I have never used it.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Please god don't save emails to a network folder. Although, I am not sure if that is better or worse than printing out 2 copies of every email your company receives.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Gyshall posted:

What are people using now that Postini is going to be moving into Google Apps? My company wants to push MX Logic but I'd rather not have to support a McAfee product.

We're looking at Forefront Security for Exchange, but our three needs are:

- Mail spooling (ie. firewall or server goes down locally mail is held until they come back up)
- Spam/antivirus
- Ability to access and send mail while servers are down/mail is being spooled.

Check out Mimecast.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Does anyone have any experiencing with the GFI Mail Archiver plugin for Outlook? How well does it work and how much of a pain is it to setup? Want to be able to archive emails automatically and then allow users to view them in Outlook without any trouble.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

I'd like to go that route, but none of our customers are going to go for Office Pro Plus which means they'll have to view archived email via OWA. Not a huge selling point and most won't care for that.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Check out GFI Mail Archiver.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Not sure on the cost, but check out MimeCast. Always heard good things.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«3 »