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Tomato Soup
Jan 16, 2006



I personally like cotton for when I travel to hot climates and the washing isn't a big concern because laundries tend to be dirt cheap in hot countries most of the time. On a related note, if you go to SE Asia or South America or plan on using laundries to wash your clothes only bring clothes that can be washed in hot water because that's what they typically use.

Even if you're not using laundries, it's nice to treat yourself once in a while because they get clothes super clean and it's a really nice feeling compared to hand washed clothes which don't tend to do the job as well as a laundry unless the hostel has an actual laundry sink.

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Ribsauce
Jul 29, 2006

Blacks in the back.


thanks again for this thread. I am doing my last minute packing and the bundle packing suggestion on the prior page was clutch. I am going to make a travel blog and will post my packing steps and comments on it. Also will give some good pictures of the bag I recommended on the prior page. I am bringing more than I meant to but most of the extra stuff are clothes I was planning on getting rid of so they probably won't make it back.

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

Anyone have a recommendation for a light weight, quick drying button down shirt, preferably short sleeve?

Also, any suggestions for a light hiker shoe that isn't a moccasin or laceless?

Cheesemaster200 fucked around with this message at Jul 14, 2011 around 16:17

raton
Jul 28, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


Ribsauce posted:

thanks again for this thread. I am doing my last minute packing and the bundle packing suggestion on the prior page was clutch. I am going to make a travel blog and will post my packing steps and comments on it. Also will give some good pictures of the bag I recommended on the prior page. I am bringing more than I meant to but most of the extra stuff are clothes I was planning on getting rid of so they probably won't make it back.

Looking forward to what you have to say.

Cheesemaster200 posted:

Anyone have a recommendation for a light weight, quick drying button down shirt, preferably short sleeve?

I'd be interested to see if anyone has suggestions along these lines. I'm fairly set on cotton long sleeve button downs as described in the OP (the sleeves are often rolled up when I wear them unless there's sun, mosquitoes, or too much aircon) but there should be something out there more in line with what Cheesemaster is looking for, too.

As for your shoes, will they be your only pair or a hiking specific pair?

raton fucked around with this message at Jul 14, 2011 around 16:53

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

Sheep-Goats posted:

I'd be interested to see if anyone has suggestions along these lines. I'm fairly set on cotton long sleeve button downs as described in the OP (the sleeves are often rolled up when I wear them unless there's sun, mosquitoes, or too much aircon) but there should be something out there more in line with what Cheesemaster is looking for, too.

As for your shoes, will they be your only pair or a hiking specific pair?

I walk everywhere and I usually am doing some hiking/outdoor activity wherever I go. I have my full scale boots, but since I am trying to go lightweight for my upcoming trip I wants something a little more low key like Merrells or something.

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



Cheesemaster200 posted:

Anyone have a recommendation for a light weight, quick drying button down shirt, preferably short sleeve?

Also, any suggestions for a light hiker shoe that isn't a moccasin or laceless?
it depends how "technical" you want to look, there's a bunch from Ex Officio, Mountain Hard Wear, REI, etc. but you tend to look like Travel Dad when you wear them. I have a couple Quiksilver poly/rayon button-ups that I like a lot, they're not the most durable but they dry in about 1/4 the time of all-cotton shirts and don't wrinkle much at all. I have one of their poly/cotton blend long sleeves that I like a lot too.

raton
Jul 28, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


"Travel Dad" term rules.

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



official Travel Dad gear:
Tilley hat
Ex-Officio shirt
Convertible nylon cargo pants
giant but non-DSLR camera
$700 in Tom Bihn bags, packing cubes, wallets, notebook holders, etc.

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

qirex posted:

Convertible nylon cargo pants

Leave me alone! I only wear my North Face pants because they are much cooler, comfortable, and have bigger pockets than any of the other adventure pants on the market!

raton
Jul 28, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


Travel Dad 200 hehe

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



Also the shirt, pants and hat are all tan and he wears shoes that look like this whether he's climbing a mountain in New Zealand or going out to dinner in Paris.

Alternate shoes:
White New Balance
Mephistos if he's rich

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


qirex posted:

official Travel Dad gear:
giant but non-DSLR camera

Psh, real travel dads carry around a camcorder and slowly pan it across everything they see, in order to make the most mind-numbing home video in the world for their relatives to pretend to watch.

raton
Jul 28, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


"Look at all this traffic. Look at this traffic. (30 seconds of fumbling with the wind muff while the audio goes PHTBHTTBTHHHBFFFBT.) Debbie isn't this crazy? (No response at all from Debbie.) Crazy traffic. (Pans to two girls walking by in school uniforms, a street vendor adjusting his cart, back to the fairly unremarkable traffic.)"

Bong Goblin
Jul 2, 2009


How's the electronics research going?

raton
Jul 28, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


Bong Goblin posted:

How's the electronics research going?

I did a little bit but I'm fairly adverse to figuring out the ins and outs of gadgets myself (I usually refuse to buy technology until it's well established just for a better price point). I'll at least get something general up by Sunday. Sorry for the long delay, I've been doing a lot of extra stuff these last two weeks (school applications, volunteering, laughing at the unfortunate, etc).

Ribsauce
Jul 29, 2006

Blacks in the back.


I wish I bought 2 pairs of REI adventure pants instead of only 1. Sheep goats was right on about them. This cargo zip off pair of pants I am wearing looks even more lame than I thought it would (and I knew they would look lame.) I also wish I bought my tiny netbook if only because I can´t find a goddamn SD card slot in this entire city (Antigua).

I did pull an awesome move. I brought one pair of sunglasses and my mom pointed out I should bring my extra pair, I go ¨what for I never have lost any before¨ BOOM 48 hours here and I lost my sunglasses:( owned

http://ribsauce.wordpress.com/
Here is my test packing list. I did not bring the pair of black shoes because they really hurt my feet if I walked more than half a mile in them. I brought another long sleeve shirt and a rain jacket (thank god it rains every day here). I think there is at least a 50% chance I don´t turn on the GBA the entire time, I have no idea why I packed it, should have replaced with my tiny netbook, the weight is probably really close. I also have a tiny sling daypack not pictured.

So far 3 people have commented when seeing my bag ¨drat you travel light¨

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


Man, this is what you want if you aren't bringing a laptop and want to upload pictures using internet cafe computers. Just throw away the miniSD adapter, keep the microSD adapter in the camera, and the card reader is smaller than a USB plug.

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

So I am starting my packing for about a month of traveling in SE Asia (Thailand, Burma, Laos, ???).

So far I have

(3) pairs REI adventure-like pants
(1) pair of cargo shorts
(1) bathing suit
(3) short sleeve button down shirts
(1) short sleeve synthetic t-shirt
(1) orioles floppy hat
(2) pairs of Smartwool socks
(3) pairs of cotton socks
(3) pairs of Capilene boxer shorts
(20) maleria pills (going to Laos for a week, quasi-rural)
(1) iPad

With this stuff I filled up about a third of my 42L pack


In addition to that, I am thinking of bringing the following:
(1) long sleeve Capilene shirt*
(1) Gore-Tex rain jacket*
(1) sarong**
(1) long sleeve button down shirt***
(1) pair of sandals ****

*Only considering these because I might, potentially, maybe climb Mt. Kinabalu. But I am torn since it is just an idea, not so much a goal. The rain jacket is a lot of room in my pack...

**I have never brought a towel with me anywhere I have traveled, though I have never really skimped on hotels/guesthouses and they have always had them.

*** I dont think I will need a long sleeve shirt, but my reasoning is that I would wear it at night to fend off mosquitoes in Laos.

**** I can't loving stand wearing sandals for any significant amount of walking distance. Are they really nice for the beach?

Any suggestions on what and what not to bring, or what to bring instead of what I have? My big concern right now is quantity. I have never traveled so light for so long before and I am unsure how much of each piece of clothing I will need.

Pompous Rhombus
Mar 11, 2007


I'll pop in in a week or two when my schedule clears up to post more contrarian bullshit/photo stuff, but:

A laundry bag is nice to have, especially if you're backpacking somewhere like Southeast Asia where you're typically farming out your laundering to someone else. It's also a great place to hide valuables in your room. My camera and/or laptop would go at the bottom of my laundry bag, itself inside my plain-jane military surplus duffle bag, which was locked.

There are a ton of things wrong with a military surplus bag for traveling (straps lack padding, deep and accessible only through the top, etc), but they hold a shitload, are tough as nails, and cheap as dirt. You're seldom walking long distances with your pack on your back in Southeast Asia anyways, so the comfort issue really isn't one. They stand out from Black Rolling Suitcase #263 at the baggage claim (throw some patches on it to differentiate from actual military ones if you're in the US) and don't scream "well-heeled tourist". They also wad up well; when I switched from regular backpacking to motorcycle touring, it went inside one of my saddlebags and didn't drag me down at all. I don't necessarily recommend them for everyone because there are more convenient and ergonomic options out there, but I've been using one since I was 19 and will probably continue to do so.



Pompous Rhombus fucked around with this message at Jul 17, 2011 around 02:18

Xenixx
Nov 30, 2007

by T. Mascis


Pompous Rhombus posted:

I'll pop in in a week or two when my schedule clears up to post more contrarian bullshit/photo stuff, but:

A laundry bag is nice to have, especially if you're backpacking somewhere like Southeast Asia where you're typically farming out your laundering to someone else. It's also a great place to hide valuables in your room. My camera and/or laptop would go at the bottom of my laundry bag, itself inside my plain-jane military surplus duffle bag, which was locked.

There are a ton of things wrong with a military surplus bag for traveling (straps lack padding, deep and accessible only through the top, etc), but they hold a shitload, are tough as nails, and cheap as dirt. You're seldom walking long distances with your pack on your back in Southeast Asia anyways, so the comfort issue really isn't one. They stand out from Black Rolling Suitcase #263 at the baggage claim (throw some patches on it to differentiate from actual military ones if you're in the US) and don't scream "well-heeled tourist". They also wad up well; when I switched from regular backpacking to motorcycle touring, it went inside one of my saddlebags and didn't drag me down at all. I don't necessarily recommend them for everyone because there are more convenient and ergonomic options out there, but I've been using one since I was 19 and will probably continue to do so.





as a veteran i think its hilarious that you travel with a mil. duffel bag

OldHansMoleman
Jan 4, 2004
I Hate Myself

Currently just at a friends house for 6 days with my dads old military duffel. I can confirm that it holds a lot but is a PAIN IN THE rear end.

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


Cheesemaster200 posted:

(20) maleria pills (going to Laos for a week, quasi-rural)

Malaria prophylactics might be a good topic to add to the OP, as well. Maybe an overview of the different kinds, and their relative efficacy and side effects?

MA-Horus
Dec 3, 2006

I'm sorry, I can't hear you over the sound of how awesome I am.


Xenixx posted:

as a veteran i think its hilarious that you travel with a mil. duffel bag

They're handy and durable. I've got my 80's era Canadian Forces duffel, I've lugged that thing all over the loving world. Durable and roomy as they are, they are hilariously uncomfortable for long carries, have no padding whatsoever. I'll take a real pack or a suitcase anyday of the week.

Mine actually got so bad when travelling in vietnam (lots of airports) that I broke down and bought a fake samsonite suitcase. So much better.

Eifert Posting
Mar 31, 2007

Atkins Diet


I have one problem with the OP.



What kind of nutter travels without a towel? As a hoopy frood, I recognize the myriad of uses a towel can offer on the road.

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


Toussaint Louverture posted:

I have one problem with the OP.



What kind of nutter travels without a towel? As a hoopy frood, I recognize the myriad of uses a towel can offer on the road.

This is all for local planetary travel, for interplanetary, interstellar, and intergalactic these rules may not apply.

raton
Jul 28, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


I wrote some cop out paragraphs about cameras and phones and computers please make some suggestions about those paragraphs if you would. Check the bottom of the text wall on the first page.

I'm going to talk about "OMG will I be able to charge my computer" in the adapters section so don't worry I didn't forget about that.

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

Why you would bring a tablet traveling:
http://www.amazon.com/Kensington-Ke...S/dp/B0043TB9D6

raton
Jul 28, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


Cheesemaster200 posted:

Why you would bring a tablet traveling:
http://www.amazon.com/Kensington-Ke...S/dp/B0043TB9D6

Uhhhhhhhh I think they just paid 600 bucks for a netbook.

Edit: I guess if they already have a tablet that's a more reasonable idea than going and buying a netbook to bring.

raton fucked around with this message at Jul 18, 2011 around 19:45

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


I think the camera section looks good, definitely a good idea to discourage people from dragging along a DSLR unless they know what they're doing with it. Seriously, everybody who travels now has a DSLR, and most of them are probably nicer than yours - if you think that having a nice camera is going to get you better pictures, you're wrong.

I can add some tips for DSLRs while traveling, though:

Lenses - People seem to love buying lenses based on focal length, and you'll see a million people walking around with 18mm - 250mm telephotos on their camera. Frankly, I almost never end up wanting a focal length of >70mm when I'm traveling (I'm using a crop-sensor DSLR, so for full-frame adjust these numbers accordingly). You're not a secret agent, you're not a photojournalist, and you're not wildlife photographer. There's just not that much to zoom in on, and if you want a longer focal length you're going to sacrifice either speed or weight/size to do it.

On the flip side, if you're like me you'll always wish you had a faster lens. Yes, your camera has a nice bright flash, and no, nothing will look good with it. Also, flash photography is going to shout out to anyone nearby that you have a camera. With a P&S or a cameraphone you can't get away with shooting without the flash, but a modern DSLR with the ISO cranked up and a fast lens (F2 or less) will get some very impressive nighttime shots. If you're using a Canon DSLR, you should own a EF50mm 1.8 prime, because it's the cheapest lens you can buy and really good for the price. If you're traveling with just one lens, I'd either get that, the 35mm version (more expensive, but on crop-sensor cameras the 50mm is really too long to use for everything), or stick with the kit 18-55. If you're wealthier than me and feel like you could afford to lose it, you could pick up a Sigma 18-50 2.8.

Cases - I would get a form-fitting, holster-style case. Don't worry about finding a case that will hold a bunch of accessories, just toss those in your regular bag and, if possible, pack the camera (in its case) into whatever daybag you're carrying around. You can't really disguise a DSLR effectively any other way, people who see it (even if you've done stupid things like cover up the logos with electrical tape) are going to know it's valuable. Keep it in your bag, and don't take it out anywhere where it will make you too much of a target.

Tripods - Don't bring them. Seriously, they suck. I do a lot of stitched pano photography, and thought that having a very lightweight tripod would be nice to help keep everything lined up and sharp, but after dragging that stupid thing around for 4 months I ended up discovering that almost none of the shots (pano or otherwise) that I took with the tripod ended up being good. And honestly, I think a lightweight tripod is actually worse than no tripod at all for DSLRs, because you can't even use them for long exposures; the camera's shutter action (yes, even with the mirror locked) is enough to jar the tripod and blur the shot.

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


Sheep-Goats posted:

Uhhhhhhhh I think they just paid 600 bucks for a netbook.

Yeah, netbooks do everything this does and more, they cost less, you can offload photos onto them, they're unbelievably durable.

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



My #1 advice for people on electronics is to charge as much stuff via USB as possible then you only need one adapter and a few cables instead of a big pile of stuff. I used to do my phone/ipod/DS on one of these but now I just use my iPad charger [and I leave my ipod and DS at home]. Sadly there's very few cameras that can charge this way.

I'm a big fan of the iPad for traveling, my ipad + charger weighs 1.5 pounds less than my netbook + power supply did and I can offload photos onto it and the battery lasts 10 hours. That said I usually stay in hotels with room safes so it might not be a good idea to have something so trendy/desirable on your typical hostel adventure.

There's also some best practices as far as computer/account security you should do on the road because even if you are using your own hardware your connection may not be trustworthy. The simplest thing to do is make a separate gmail account just for that trip with a 100% unique password and forward your mail to that. This will prevent 99% of "oh man my main email account got compromised and now my whole life is poo poo" scenarios Also if you need to check your money [and you're in the US/Canada] set up a mint.com account [again with a unique PW] so you're not typing in your online banking credentials unless you really need to.

raton
Jul 28, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


Yeah, maybe I'll stress it more but low light (and fast action) photography will make up a lot more of your travel pictures than you think, and will comprise a huge amount of the good ones that people actually want to see when you get home. I'd much rather have a P&S with a 3x zoom that can take bangin' pictures at night than a P&S with a 7x zoom that blurs on heavily zoomed pictures even if it's just overcast out (which is what I have now). A fast lens on a DSLR would be essential. Also I should add something about underwater photography.

Edit: I'll add that last part as a quote, quirex. Thanks.

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

Sheep-Goats posted:

Uhhhhhhhh I think they just paid 600 bucks for a netbook.

Edit: I guess if they already have a tablet that's a more reasonable idea than going and buying a netbook to bring.

Oh absolutely, I would have never actually bought an iPad by itself (it was my "Christmas bonus"). But if you have one, it is cheaper and easier than buying a netbook.

quote:

Tripods - Don't bring them. Seriously, they suck. I do a lot of stitched pano photography, and thought that having a very lightweight tripod would be nice to help keep everything lined up and sharp, but after dragging that stupid thing around for 4 months I ended up discovering that almost none of the shots (pano or otherwise) that I took with the tripod ended up being good. And honestly, I think a lightweight tripod is actually worse than no tripod at all for DSLRs, because you can't even use them for long exposures; the camera's shutter action (yes, even with the mirror locked) is enough to jar the tripod and blur the shot.
Those little mini-tripods are great for self shots. They weigh next to nothing and take up no space so I always carry one along with me. They may not be perfect for late night time lapse, but they are still useful.

Speaking of, what do you guys use for day bags? I am packing so light that I could probably just use my backpack everywhere I go (it used to be my day pack on other trips), however it would be nice to have something a tad bit smaller and easier to access.

Cheesemaster200 fucked around with this message at Jul 18, 2011 around 20:01

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



I'm slightly less in love with my Canon s95 than I was when I first got it, I think because when pictures really come out they look so good that you're mad when you look at them next to the "OK" ones. I still think it's the best camera for its size you can get but I'd absolutely love it if it had faster shot-to-shot and autofocus and maybe some interface tweaks.

The s95 set on Auto with the lens at its widest and the flash off will produce better photos than pretty much any other small camera but it's kind of a waste to buy a $400 camera and not learn to use it.

qirex fucked around with this message at Jul 18, 2011 around 20:15

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


Cheesemaster200 posted:

Those little mini-tripods are great for self shots. They weigh next to nothing and take up no space so I always carry one along with me. They may not be perfect for late night time lapse, but they are still useful.

I'm talking about things from the perspective of someone bringing a DSLR, in which case the camera will barely be stable on a mini-tripod. Also, if you're dragging along a DSLR I think it's a little silly to do the "here's a picture of me in front of the [insert famous building here]" routine with it, but I guess that's personal preference.

qirex posted:

There's also some best practices as far as computer/account security you should do on the road because even if you are using your own hardware your connection may not be trustworthy. The simplest thing to do is make a separate gmail account just for that trip with a 100% unique password and forward your mail to that. This will prevent 99% of "oh man my main email account got compromised and now my whole life is poo poo" scenarios Also if you need to check your money [and you're in the US/Canada] set up a mint.com account [again with a unique PW] so you're not typing in your online banking credentials unless you really need to.

This is probably a little paranoid; if you're using Gmail all traffic is encrypted via SSL so you should be completely safe. This is also true of most banking sites, but not true of Facebook; they only encrypt the log in page. So someone couldn't sniff your user/pass if you log in to Facebook on an unsecured wireless network, but they could grab the cookie it gives you and masquerade as you for as long as you were logged in, probably changing your status to "penis penis penis" and making lewd comments on your friends' pictures. The key thing is having your own computer/phone/whatever to check your mail, because the real concern is keyloggers at internet cafes. If you want to be extra safe, I'd recommend you get into the habit of checking your activity log regularly.

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


qirex posted:

I'm slightly less in love with my Canon s95 than I was when I first got it, I think because when pictures really come out they look so good that you're mad when you look at them next to the "OK" ones. I still think it's the best camera for its size you can get but I'd absolutely love it if it had faster shot-to-shot and autofocus and maybe some interface tweaks.

The s95 set on Auto with the lens at its widest and the flash off will produce better photos than pretty much any other small camera but it's kind of a waste to buy a $400 camera and not learn to use it.

If you had the money to blow, you could consider getting a Canon G12 - the S95 is based off the same big-for-a-small-camera sensor, which is why the pictures look so great, but it has a faster continuous shot speed.

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



Mradyfist posted:

This is probably a little paranoid; if you're using Gmail all traffic is encrypted via SSL so you should be completely safe. This is also true of most banking sites, but not true of Facebook; they only encrypt the log in page.
It's not paranoid if you've seen the extent some places go to to jack online banking credentials from tourists, e.g. hidden cameras over keyboards. Also hotel networks are the absolute "dirtiest" as far as malware goes.

Mradyfist posted:

If you had the money to blow, you could consider getting a Canon G12 - the S95 is based off the same big-for-a-small-camera sensor, which is why the pictures look so great, but it has a faster continuous shot speed.
The G12 has a slower lens at wide open and weighs twice as much, if I wanted a bigger camera I probably would have gone for a micro 4/3 or a NEX.

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

quote:

I'm talking about things from the perspective of someone bringing a DSLR, in which case the camera will barely be stable on a mini-tripod. Also, if you're dragging along a DSLR I think it's a little silly to do the "here's a picture of me in front of the [insert famous building here]" routine with it, but I guess that's personal preference.
I wouldn't drag along a DSLR just for that. However, if I am dragging it along anyway, you might as well get said pictures taken with a better camera. Why wouldn't you?

Not to mention the mini-tripod is also helpful for point and shoots as well.

Mradyfist
Sep 3, 2007

People that can eat people are the luckiest people in the world


qirex posted:

It's not paranoid if you've seen the extent some places go to to jack online banking credentials from tourists, e.g. hidden cameras over keyboards. Also hotel networks are the absolute "dirtiest" as far as malware goes.

I know, that's why I'd always recommend bringing a netbook with you. As long as you can avoid ever using someone else's computer to do anything important, you shouldn't have to worry. People think of wireless networks as being "unsecure" because they're not always encrypted, but everything important that you do is encrypted anyway, and all the way from your browser to the server instead of just between you and the access point owned by the shady hostel. The real risk is using a internet cafe's computer or a kiosk somewhere.

Cheesemaster200 posted:

I wouldn't drag along a DSLR just for that. However, if I am dragging it along anyway, you might as well get said pictures taken with a better camera. Why wouldn't you?

Not to mention the mini-tripod is also helpful for point and shoots as well.

Apart from being concerned that I'm setting my most expensive possession on a little stand and then walking 10 or 15 feet away from it in a public place? I try to travel with only things that I can stand to have stolen, but I'd still rather get my point and shoot stolen than my DSLR. Plus honestly, that type of picture will likely look better from the point and shoot - the smaller image sensor means that for the same aperture you have more depth of field, so you'll have an easier time getting whatever's behind you and yourself in focus at the same time.

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Hummer Driving Faggot
Sep 23, 2004


IS THAT A STUPID NEWBIE AVATAR? FUCK NO, YOU'RE GETTING A PENTAR

SKILCRAFT KREW Reppin' Quality Blind Made Products

I have to plug Icebreaker clothing. I was in France for a month and wore two Icebreaker t-shirts the whole time, rotating every couple of days. I did wear deodorant every day but it was a long time before my BO was noticeable. They are very thin but can be layered for warmth, especially with the heavier weight fabrics. My green shirt started showing pitstains which is a mystery to me because I've never had pitstains since switching for anti-perspirant to deodorant.

Very expensive for shirts but I think they're worth it.

https://www.icebreaker.com

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