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Zeroisanumber
Oct 23, 2010



Nap Ghost


Jesus. How did this get printed. Even for a magazine that spends its every waking moment fellating the rich this comes off as some bullshit that the dimmest scions of old money wealth talk about when they're halfway through a bottle of Johnny Walker Blue.

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A Fancy 400 lbs
Jul 23, 2008


Is that nutjob implying that aviation technology has been advanced solely by private industry? Like, has he never heard of World War I, World War II or the Cold War?

Nintendo Kid
Aug 4, 2011

Trophy-ko says:
~death to capitalism~

Hilalry is 45


Zeroisanumber posted:

Jesus. How did this get printed. Even for a magazine that spends its every waking moment fellating the rich this comes off as some bullshit that the dimmest scions of old money wealth talk about when they're halfway through a bottle of Johnny Walker Blue.

It didn't get printed, he's a strictly online writer. Forbes will let pretty much anyone write for their online service.

Dr. Tough
Oct 21, 2007



Install Windows posted:

It didn't get printed, he's a strictly online writer. Forbes will let pretty much anyone write for their online service.

Yeah pretty much. Forbes has some people that are face meltingly stupid on their website. The guy I linked to is not even the worst I've seen on there.

Slo-Tek
Jun 8, 2001

WINDOWS 98 BEAT HIS FRIEND WITH A SHOVEL

A Fancy 400 lbs posted:

Is that nutjob implying that aviation technology has been advanced solely by private industry? Like, has he never heard of World War I, World War II or the Cold War?

Thing is, war, and especially secrecy is poo poo for technological innovation. What war does is jack up production, which can drop the unit cost, but it doesn't result in more/better poo poo faster. The span from 1940 to 1950 resulted in a lot fewer major technological discoveries than the 1950-1960 time period, in aeronautics and everything else. During war, you decide "jets are interesting, but gently caress it we have a war to win, build more Merlins and 4360's. But when you don't have to bend your entire economy toward building 100,000 1940's vintage bombers, you can spare a little juice for super-science.

cafel
Mar 29, 2010

This post is hurting the economy!


Slo-Tek posted:

Thing is, war, and especially secrecy is poo poo for technological innovation. What war does is jack up production, which can drop the unit cost, but it doesn't result in more/better poo poo faster. The span from 1940 to 1950 resulted in a lot fewer major technological discoveries than the 1950-1960 time period, in aeronautics and everything else. During war, you decide "jets are interesting, but gently caress it we have a war to win, build more Merlins and 4360's. But when you don't have to bend your entire economy toward building 100,000 1940's vintage bombers, you can spare a little juice for super-science.

That may be the case for the field when it was already in a developed state, but I don't think the effects World War 1 had in advancing aviation can be denied. In only four years the state of aviation went from awkward, fragile and underpowered planes with limited endurance being flown by a handful of eccentric hobbyists, to maneuverable, robust and fast planes capable of covering extend distances and performing actual tasks and a giant pool of pilots from all walks of life with the interest and the expertise to fly them. The time to design and begin mass production of a plane was on the order of months and the concept of air power was so new and untested that every new design could render the enemies current model obsolete, so rapid turn over of models was encouraged.

And all of this is moot anyway since most of the major aeronautical research post World War 2 was funded and directed by government interests, not private attempts. Hell even a good chunk of the private innovations of the 1920's and 30's was backed by government money, not job creators jizzing out rainbows and unicorns.

VideoTapir
Oct 18, 2005

He'll tire eventually.


"Exponentially"

I do not think this word means what he thinks it means.


I'm also reminded of something Chris Hedges has mentioned every time he's spoken in the last few years: capitalism is going to crash into the limits of our natural resources. Even if that retard's pipe dream came true, it's just pushing the opening date for Thunderdome closer.

JDM3
Jun 26, 2013

Best $10 bux I ever spent on a total stranger.. who happens to be a fucking douchetube.


VideoTapir posted:

"Exponentially"

I do not think this word means what he thinks it means.


I'm also reminded of something Chris Hedges has mentioned every time he's spoken in the last few years: capitalism is going to crash into the limits of our natural resources. Even if that retard's pipe dream came true, it's just pushing the opening date for Thunderdome closer.

No, that will magically be solved by technology too, haven't you been paying attention? HELLOOOOOOOO - has anyone heard of something called mining asteroids? Perhaps you remember this little movie called ALIEN in which this was a central plot point? No, don't give me those bullshit equations that show how ridiculously impossible that would be - you liberals just have bad attitudes.

PeterWeller
Apr 20, 2003

I told you that story so I could tell you this one.


Slo-Tek posted:

Thing is, war, and especially secrecy is poo poo for technological innovation. What war does is jack up production, which can drop the unit cost, but it doesn't result in more/better poo poo faster. The span from 1940 to 1950 resulted in a lot fewer major technological discoveries than the 1950-1960 time period, in aeronautics and everything else. During war, you decide "jets are interesting, but gently caress it we have a war to win, build more Merlins and 4360's. But when you don't have to bend your entire economy toward building 100,000 1940's vintage bombers, you can spare a little juice for super-science.

This isn't really true, though. War breeds a great deal of technological competition. Tons of money is poured into incremental improvements to existing technologies to get the slightest edge.America refined and developed new and better piston aircraft throughout World War Two. American and British scientists advanced radar and sonar by leaps and bounds to help win the battle for the Atlantic. Computer technology received a great deal of development to break the codes that enabled secrecy. The Germans poured who knows how many resources into developing an eccentric hobby, rocketry, into a viable weapon.

Even today's wars spur technological advancement. Prosthetics and trauma care have developed greatly in response to the Iraq War. Drones have gone from science fiction to reality thanks to the War on Terror.

get that OUT of my face
Feb 10, 2007



Is it OK to post Thought Catalog garbage here?

Being Privileged Is Not A Choice, So Stop Hating Me For It

quote:

What do you suggest I do about it?

I’m sick of feeling self-conscious every time someone brings up the burden of student loans. I dread being asked what I plan to do after graduation about paying them back. Sometimes I lie. Sometimes I make up a line about praying I find a great job or can pay off my loans by working for the government.

But I’m sick of lying. I’m sick of feeling ashamed for being privileged.

I am in graduate school and am debt free. I have Baby Boomer parents who work hard and did much better than they ever expected in their careers. They wanted to pay for my college and graduate school. They demanded to pay for my college and graduate school.

I work hard. I earned partial scholarships in college and graduate school. I work a part-time job, babysit, and go to school full-time. I am earnestly applying for jobs and I look forward to a career in public service.

I want to stop lying about the suits I buy for my internship. I want to stop saying they are hand me down’s from my cousin. I want to be able to say thank you when I receive a compliment on them. I was taught that you should always dress for the job you want, not the job you have. I want to be taken seriously at my internship and look professional—and I have the resources to buy nice-looking suits and have my hair professionally highlighted.

I’m tired of justifying my address and the backlash I receive when I tell people I am a student and live in a high-rise apartment. I’m tired of the looks my doorman gives me when he hands me my package (of work clothes) delivered from J.Crew.

So stop making me feel like I’ve done something wrong. Stop making me feel like I am less deserving. I didn’t ask to be born into this kind of circumstance and I’m tired of being judged for it.

I’m not asking for sympathy, I’m asking for people to lay off. There is always enough money in my bank account and I’m not sorry that is my situation. I understand the value of a dollar. I am not wasteful. I understand the overwhelming financial burdens of others and I highly encourage people to openly bitch about it. That blows. But your situation doesn’t change my situation. I am responsible and fortunate for the resources I have. I’ll respect your background if you respect mine.

cafel
Mar 29, 2010

This post is hurting the economy!


Y-Hat posted:

Is it OK to post Thought Catalog garbage here?

Being Privileged Is Not A Choice, So Stop Hating Me For It

The author should have titled this "I have serious self esteem and self worth issues: Please validate me'. It reads like an OP in E/N.

blackmet
Aug 5, 2006

I believe there is a universal Truth to the process of doing things right (Not that I have any idea what that actually means).

Thought Catalog can be PAINFUL to read about 3/4 of the time anyway. This is just an extreme example of their overwrought Brooklyn Williamsburg hipster special snowflakeness.

The comments are actually good, though.

Bel_Canto
Apr 23, 2007

"Pedicabo ego vos et irrumabo."


Y-Hat posted:

Is it OK to post Thought Catalog garbage here?

Being Privileged Is Not A Choice, So Stop Hating Me For It

There is so much glorious white whine in here that I feel the need to pair it with a well-aged brie.

Wolfsheim
Dec 23, 2003


Y-Hat posted:

Is it OK to post Thought Catalog garbage here?

Being Privileged Is Not A Choice, So Stop Hating Me For It

This may be the best troll, in the sense that I was like two paragraphs in before I wished for this person to be beat into unconsciousness. If it's real, I guess I can take solace in the fact that everyone he knows hates him as much as I do.

I bet when you ask him about women, he describes himself as "a nice guy."

Pirate Radar
Apr 18, 2008

yeeeeee strigoi!!


cafel posted:

The author should have titled this "I have serious self esteem and self worth issues: Please validate me'. It reads like an OP in E/N.

I don't know, that sounds awfully esteemprivileged to me.

Walter
Jul 3, 2003

We think they're great. In a grand, mystical, neopolitical sense, these guys have a real message in their music. They don't, however, have neat names like me and Bono.

Y-Hat posted:

Is it OK to post Thought Catalog garbage here?

Being Privileged Is Not A Choice, So Stop Hating Me For It

For the first couple paragraphs, I actually thought, "this isn't so bad." I could have written them, they more or less described my college and graduate school experiences (at least until my PhD). My parents helped me with tuition, and I came out of my BA and MS debt free.

Believe me, I know how fortunate I was.

Then I got a little further into the article. As has already been said, if this was a troll, it was well done.

MisterBadIdea
Oct 9, 2012

Anything?


Eh, it's okay. Nowhere near as funny as the immortal "If Only We Could Be Boring."

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



MisterBadIdea posted:

Eh, it's okay. Nowhere near as funny as the immortal "If Only We Could Be Boring."

Didn't know what that was so I looked it up. Holy christ, that's incredible.

Ocean Book
Sep 27, 2010

- hi

Bubbacub posted:

Didn't know what that was so I looked it up. Holy christ, that's incredible.

Same. As a person who often feels pressure to be 'on' in social situations I though the title sounded promising. But the whole website seems to be a fury mill of some sort?

Fritz Coldcockin
Nov 7, 2005

I'm out here freezing my castagnas off



Dinosaur Gum

Y-Hat posted:

Is it OK to post Thought Catalog garbage here?

Being Privileged Is Not A Choice, So Stop Hating Me For It

I had an aunt once who suffered from this. She was convinced that there were con men living across the street from her and used to sleep with a pair of hedge clippers in her bed so they couldn't surprise sex her while she was sleeping.

Seriously, if he's so paranoid about his clothes, then I'm guessing he's basically GOB Bluth ("...f-king $3000 suit! COME ON!"). If he's so dumb he can't just say "I was lucky enough to come out of school without any debt", then I don't know what to tell him.

JDM3
Jun 26, 2013

Best $10 bux I ever spent on a total stranger.. who happens to be a fucking douchetube.


Alter Ego posted:

I had an aunt once who suffered from this. She was convinced that there were con men living across the street from her and used to sleep with a pair of hedge clippers in her bed so they couldn't surprise sex her while she was sleeping.

Seriously, if he's so paranoid about his clothes, then I'm guessing he's basically GOB Bluth ("...f-king $3000 suit! COME ON!"). If he's so dumb he can't just say "I was lucky enough to come out of school without any debt", then I don't know what to tell him.

I have no idea why, but when I read it I pictured a woman. Not going to bother checking for pronouns, etc.
*EDIT* had to check....

Not that it matters, but unless this guy is the king of tinted-hair "so secure gender wise that he babysits" metrosexuals, it's a woman. Makes it no less irritating, but it does change things a bit.

rkajdi
Sep 11, 2001

End the populist machination of democracy.
End the repression of the superior betters of society from criticism by worthless dregs via the tyrannous bullhorn known as the 'vote'.
Only the meritorious can rule!


This boot tastes soooooo good.


It's been showing up on other blogs for a few days, but it appears it's a woman writing the original piece.

Fritz Coldcockin
Nov 7, 2005

I'm out here freezing my castagnas off



Dinosaur Gum

JDM3 posted:

I have no idea why, but when I read it I pictured a woman. Not going to bother checking for pronouns, etc.
*EDIT* had to check....

Not that it matters, but unless this guy is the king of tinted-hair "so secure gender wise that he babysits" metrosexuals, it's a woman. Makes it no less irritating, but it does change things a bit.

Oh yeah, I missed the hair part. Still, she's probably an rear end in a top hat on the level of GOB Bluth.

flatbus
Sep 19, 2012


I actually read it as a guy who always paid someone to highlight his hair with Douchenozzle Bleach streaks before going to interviews with a new suit.

JDM3
Jun 26, 2013

Best $10 bux I ever spent on a total stranger.. who happens to be a fucking douchetube.


flatbus posted:

I actually read it as a guy who always paid someone to highlight his hair with Douchenozzle Bleach streaks before going to interviews with a new suit.

"Douchenozzle" is so 2012, dude. Everyone knows it's douchetube now. Get with the program (<-- ironic use of 2008 term)

Dr. Tough
Oct 21, 2007



quote:

Wake up people!

I’ve become aware of a book on the history of World War II written by Robert Welch who founded the John Birch Society back in 1958. This book is based largely on the explosive allegations it contains about the alleged crimes of General Dwight Eisenhower in the war in Europe, which have never been properly investigated. To stop the treason of today, which will continue unless we stop the modern-day traitors destroying our country now by economic and political means, we should read the book, “The Politician”, (see the Internet and JBS.org). We need to understand such critical history exposing the treason against the U.S., including the thousands of our prisoners of war that Eisenhower allowed Joseph Stalin to kidnap to the Soviet Union for forced labor. Eisenhower stood on Lenin’s tomb and was given the highest honor of the Soviet Union. That reportedly came with an annual monetary payment. We must use historical understanding to stop the current treason now upon us – wake up people!

Sincerely,

Ed Nemecheck
Landers, California

Manifest Dynasty
Feb 29, 2008


"see the Internet..."

Borneo Jimmy
Feb 27, 2007

by Smythe


This woman would've had a good point if she had not chosen the worst analogy possible
http://www.startribune.com/opinion/.../226825631.html

quote:

According to some theories, Tony Blair (former British Prime Minister) supported the United States in Iraq not only because he wanted to preserve the special relationship, but also because he believed going to war was morally right. He supported the war without regards to his party’s support.

The Iraq war is in no way, shape, or form, similar to the government shutdown, but Blair’s approach to it is still one to be admired. Boehner needs to forget about being in good standing with Republicans, and do what is morally right for this country.

Badger of Basra
Jul 25, 2007



Niall Ferguson recently published a 3-part series of full sized blog posts (2000+ words each) whining about how mean Paul Krugman is on the Huffington Post, joining the illustrious company of Jenny McCarthy and Bianca Jagger.

Sample quotes from part 3:

Niall Ferguson posted:

You may ask: Why have I taken the trouble to do this? I have three motives. The first is to illuminate the way the world really works, as opposed to the way Krugman and his beloved New Keynesian macroeconomic models say it works. The second is to assert the importance of humility and civility in public as well as academic discourse. And the third, frankly, is to teach him the meaning of the old Scottish regimental motto: nemo me impune lacessit ("No one attacks me with impunity").

quote:

For too long, Paul Krugman has exploited his authority as an award-winning economist and his power as a New York Times columnist to heap opprobrium on anyone who ventures to disagree with him. Along the way, he has acquired a claque of like-minded bloggers who play a sinister game of tag with him, endorsing his attacks and adding vitriol of their own. I would like to name and shame in this context Dean Baker, Josh Barro, Brad DeLong, Matthew O'Brien, Noah Smith, Matthew Yglesias and Justin Wolfers. Krugman and his acolytes evidently relish the viciousness of their attacks, priding themselves on the crassness of their language. But I should like to know what qualifies a figure like Matt O'Brien to call anyone a "disingenuous idiot"? What exactly are his credentials? 35,550 tweets? How does he essentially differ from the cranks who, before the Internet, had to vent their spleen by writing letters in green ink?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/niall..._b_4073956.html

A claque! Also some classic "do you know who I am???"

I don't think we've heard from him since he said Keynes was incapable of long-term thinking because he was gay.

get that OUT of my face
Feb 10, 2007



You can't talk about Niall Ferguson without bringing up the scathing review of Civilisation: The West and the Rest in the London Review of Books and the ensuing letters that came as a result.

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v33/n21/pankaj.../watch-this-man

Lee Harvey Oswald
Mar 16, 2007

by exmarx


http://timesfreepress.com/news/2013...?opinionletters

quote:

VW imposing 'dictatorship'

I own a 2012 Passat, made here in Chattanooga. It's a great car but probably my last. Forget the debate over "is the UAW good or bad." Didn't VW know that Tennessee is a right-to-work state when they came here? Sounds to be that they are trying to force a union on the workers and our state as a condition for future growth and employment. Isn't that in violation of the right-to-work laws? I thought the Germans had given up "dictatorship" back in the '40s. Guess not.

GORDON SMITH, Signal Mountain

Anti-union people are the dumbest motherfuckers on earth. And LOL at VW "wanting" a union.

How dare workers want fair wages and treatement!

Mo_Steel
Mar 7, 2008

Let's Clock Into The Sunset Together



Fun Shoe

Normally Kersten's articles are just idiotic, but this one winds up being pretty offensive:

quote:

Liberals are waging a war on the weak
A weak moral code is responsible for the divide between rich and poor

We hear from all sides that America is becoming “two nations.” The upper class of highly educated professionals is flourishing — rich and getting richer. But many in the working class are struggling — dropping out of the workforce and leading increasingly dysfunctional lives. The middle class is shrinking and beginning to show similar signs of dysfunction.

Liberal opinionmakers bemoan this inequality, which they tend to view solely in economic terms. Yet ironically — even as they call for more wealth redistribution and job training — they fail to see the responsibility they bear for the social conditions in which many of our society’s less fortunate members now flounder.

Since the 1960s, America’s elite — on the campus and in the media, government and nonprofit sectors — has led a crusade for social and cultural “liberation.” In the process, it has jettisoned once-clear standards of conduct, substituting a fluid new moral code that champions self-actualization and “choosing your own values.”

In a recent issue of First Things, R.R. Reno, the journal’s editor, listed the multiple arenas in which America is seeing the relaxation or abandonment of once-universal norms: from sex and marriage to the legalization of gambling, marijuana and assisted suicide. On all these fronts, moral restrictions are being dropped in the name of expanding freedom for all.

Affluent, college-educated people — the top 20 percent — can generally handle the new smorgasbord of choices, thanks to their education, their grasp of risk and the social capital that helped them achieve success in the first place. But the poorly educated and vulnerable, who often lack these resources, cannot.

Reno cites statistics that prove his point. For example, upper-class Americans have developed a “relatively disciplined approach to drugs,” he says. But parents who dropped out of high school are twice as likely to have children who use marijuana as are parents with college degrees. The less educated a person, the more likely he is to be a frequent gambler.

Today, freedom for the strong is coming at the expense of the weak, Reno concludes. Our society, despite professed concern for the less fortunate, is waging a “war on the weak.”

In our newly liberated world, the biggest advantage the strong have may be their ability to manipulate the complex, open-ended moral code that is replacing the straightforward rules that once guided life. Think of the movie “Cinderella Man.” Russell Crowe’s character, a down-and-out boxer in the Depression, admonishes his son — who has stolen food for his hungry family — that stealing is wrong, no matter the circumstances. The boy is ashamed. He doesn’t need a complex explanation.

Today, however, the language of right and wrong is evaporating. In its place, we promote subjective rules for living, open to endless interpretation. “Make healthy choices,” we tell our youngsters. “Value diversity.” Do things that are “in your comfort zone.” People with the education and ability to conjure prosocial meaning from these therapeutic buzzwords feel in control of their moral lives. Others, who need a clearer compass to navigate life’s shoals, are set adrift.

The consequences have been most dramatic in the arena of sex and family formation. On these issues, we live in a moral Wild West. “Decide for yourself when you’re ready” for sex, we tell our kids. Sex of any kind is OK so long as it’s “safe” and there’s mutual consent.

As a group, America’s upper class has managed to hold family life together despite this relaxed sexual ethic, as Charles Murray documented in his 2012 book, “Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010.” But the bottom third of the population is collapsing into social disarray.

In 1960, notes Murray, only 2 percent of all white births were out-of-wedlock. Today, it’s about 8 percent for white college graduates, but an astonishing 60 percent for white high school dropouts. Most college grads still marry, and their divorce rate — after rising — has declined to 1970s levels. But, among the bottom third of Americans, marriage is becoming rare and divorce rates are sky-high.

Our college-educated elite “talks the talk of the ’60s, but walks the walk of the ’50s,” in Reno’s words. Yet it refuses to criticize the self-destructive conduct of others. That’s because the one nonnegotiable principle of the flexible moral system is nonjudgmentalism.

This is deeply selfish, says Reno. Our elite has crafted “a nonjudgmental ethic suited entirely for itself,” he says, while deconstructing the moral code that once sustained the weak. “One of the most fundamental forms of greed that has emerged in the last fifty years is cultural and moral,” he says.

Even if we could magically equalize incomes, our nation would still be marred by the kind of inequality that matters most: cultural and moral inequality.

Katherine Kersten is a senior fellow at the Center of the American Experiment. The views expressed here are her own. She is at kakersten@gmail.com.

Emphasis mine. Poor people are poor because they are immoral idiots who can't handle their lives unless society imposes upon them sexual norms and legally enforced morals. They are morally and culturally inferior to rich elites.

Mo_Steel fucked around with this message at Oct 20, 2013 around 19:16

Shalebridge Cradle
Apr 23, 2008




Mo_Steel posted:

Emphasis mine. Poor people are poor because they are immoral idiots who can't handle their lives unless society imposes upon them sexual norms and legally enforced morals. They are morally and culturally inferior to rich elites.

Its funny because some studies have found the exact opposite is true.

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/02/21/1118373109

quote:

Abstract
Seven studies using experimental and naturalistic methods reveal that upper-class individuals behave more unethically than lower-class individuals. In studies 1 and 2, upper-class individuals were more likely to break the law while driving, relative to lower-class individuals. In follow-up laboratory studies, upper-class individuals were more likely to exhibit unethical decision-making tendencies (study 3), take valued goods from others (study 4), lie in a negotiation (study 5), cheat to increase their chances of winning a prize (study 6), and endorse unethical behavior at work (study 7) than were lower-class individuals. Mediator and moderator data demonstrated that upper-class individuals’ unethical tendencies are accounted for, in part, by their more favorable attitudes toward greed.

Tacky-Ass Rococco
Sep 6, 2010

by R. Guyovich



This is basically pocket Nietzsche, but from a conservative perspective, which immediately makes it useless. Still, in some sense he's right, inasmuch as it's true that the total eclipse of all values is upon us.

VideoTapir
Oct 18, 2005

He'll tire eventually.


What else has been happening since the 1960s that could have a negative impact on family formation? Gee, I can't think of anything.

Sex Robot
Jan 11, 2011

Nothing amazing happens here.
Everything is ordinary.


Shalebridge Cradle" post=""42075 posted:

Its funny because some studies have found the exact opposite is true.

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/02/21/1118373109

It practical terms the rich also have better resources to make these moral... hiccups, "go away".

I am also unequivocally reminded of this

Crashbee
May 15, 2007

Stupid people are great at winning arguments, because they're too stupid to realize they've lost.

Niall Ferguson posted:

The second is to assert the importance of humility and civility in public as well as academic discourse.

Is this really the same man who titled his biography of Thatcher 'Always Right'?

OwlBot 2000
Jun 1, 2009


[url=http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303448104579149642030106938] ObamaCare 2016: Happy Yet? The website problems were finally solved. But the doctor shortage is a nightmare.[/quote]

"Dr. Allen, a pediatric heart surgeon, is a former professor and surgical director of the Children's Heart Institute in Houston."

Bradley Allen posted:

Three years after the disastrous launch of the Affordable Care Act, most of the website troubles finally have been ironed out. People are now able to log on to the government's ACA website and to most of the state health-insurance exchanges. The public has grudgingly come to accept higher insurance premiums, new taxes and increases in part-time workers who were formerly full-time. But Americans are irate anyway—because now they're seeing the health-care law's destructive effect on the fundamental nature of the way their care is delivered.

Even before the ACA's launch in 2013, many physicians—seeing the changes in their profession that lay ahead—had begun talking their children out of going to medical school. After the launch, compensation fell, while nothing in the ACA stopped lawsuits and malpractice premiums from rising. Doctors must now see many more patients each day to meet expenses, all while dealing with the mountains of paperwork mandated by the health-care law.
The forecast shortage of doctors has become a real problem. It started in 2014 when the ACA cut $716 billion from Medicare to accommodate 30 million newly "insured" people through an expansion of Medicaid. More important, the predicted shortage of 42,000 primary-care physicians and that of specialists (such as heart surgeons) was vastly underestimated. It didn't take into account the ACA's effect on doctors retiring early, refusing new patients or going into concierge medicine. These estimates also ignored the millions of immigrants who would be seeking a physician after having been granted legal status.

It is surprising that the doctor shortage was not better anticipated: After all, when Massachusetts mandated health insurance in 2006, the wait to see a physician in some specialties increased considerably, the shortage of primary-care physicians escalated and more doctors stopped accepting new patients. In 2013, the Massachusetts Medical Society noted waiting times from 50 days to 128 days in some areas for new patients to see an internist, for instance.

But doctor shortages are only the beginning.

Even before the ACA cut $716 billion from its budget, Medicare only reimbursed hospitals and doctors for 70%-85% of their costs. Once this cut further reduced reimbursements, and the ACA added stacks of paperwork, more doctors refused to accept Medicare: It just didn't cover expenses.

Then there is the ACA's Medicare (government) board that dictates and rations care, and the board has begun to cut reimbursements. Some physicians now refuse even to take patients over 50 years old, not wanting to be burdened with them when they reach Medicare age. Seniors aren't happy. Medicaid in 2016 has similar problems. A third of physicians refused to accept new Medicaid patients in 2013, and with Medicaid's expansion and government cuts, the numbers of doctors who don't take Medicaid skyrocketed. The uninsured poor now have insurance, but they can't find a doctor, so essentially the ACA was of no help.

...
With an average of $300,000 in student loans, eight years of college and medical school, and three to seven years as underpaid, overworked residents, a prospective physician in the ACA era would be starting a career at age 30 in a job that requires working 70-80 hours a week in an assembly-line fashion to earn perhaps $100,000 a year. No wonder so many qualified individuals these days are choosing careers on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley instead of medicine.

It goes on for quite a while like this. But this guy does make a convincing case for getting rid of clunky programs like Medicaid, Medicare, and laws like the ACA, to be replaced with fully socialized medical care where doctors will be employed directly by the government. Additionally, he makes a convincing case that medical education takes too long and costs too much, and should be streamlined and paid for by the government . Good work, Retired Doctor!

Shalebridge Cradle
Apr 23, 2008




OwlBot 2000 posted:

ObamaCare 2016: Happy Yet? The website problems were finally solved. But the doctor shortage is a nightmare.

Is this just ObamaCare fan fiction, or enemy fiction I guess? Jesus the WSJ has become lovely.

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OwlBot 2000
Jun 1, 2009


Yeah, it reminds me of those LAST DAYS OF CAPITALISM stories after Obama's election.

quote:

EL PASO - Years into the Presidency of Barrack Obama and his promise of healthcare to everyone in America seems to be going well. But some, like Aaron Smith, seem to express reservations.

"It's sort of a blur." Smith, a 45-year old doctor, said. "My daughter took her first steps into this world. That was in Albany. I don't know where I am."

Smith is one of reportedly thousands of doctors stranded like this. They move in familiar places, the hearth, the store, and the dusty back rooms which go ignored for six days of the seven. But those places slowly twist all wrong and they find themselves in new places. Sick places. Smith finds himself treating diabetic immigrants who, just months ago, would have died foreign and alone in a strange place. But he too is a stranger.

"I speak Spanish now." Smith says, glancing at his watch with darkened eyes. "I don't want to speak [Spanish] anymore." He goes through motions, prodding a dying foot with his rubber hammer.

Accounts of the disappearances are as such: You look away, glance down at your life for a moment, and then your husband is missing. Your wife. He has been spirited away in service. The Congressional Budget Office says that most of the funding for Obama's new health plan has been used for transit- Cars and their ilk to carry lovers to their home. But not all of these stories have a happy ending.

"It's not familiar here." Dana Sioban, a 35-year-old nurse practitioner. "My dog is here and my house is full of messages, but I stay in the yard and my brother must watch me sleep."

OwlBot 2000 fucked around with this message at Oct 23, 2013 around 02:49

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