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Easychair Bootson
May 7, 2004

Where's the last guy?
Ultimo hombre.
Last man standing.
Must've been one.


Heintron posted:

Welp, time to get one of those universal depriming dies with a shitload of extra depriming pins.
Get the Lee Universal Decapping die. I got one to replace my RCBS decapping die, which would only occasionally break a pin, but when it did it was sometimes a pain in the rear end to remove due to the design.

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Sten Freak
Sep 10, 2008

Despite all of these shortcomings, the Sten still has a long track record of shooting people right in the face.


College Slice

shovelbum posted:

Subgun loads for 7.65 longue are evidently pretty sensitive (fine line between bad things happening and the gun not running?)
Yeah, that's what the author of the Small Arms Review wrote and 2 other loaders of the round I've talked to have all said. A poster on another forum claimed he pushed it higher without ill effects but brass is a buck a round so you definitely don't want to deform it.

Regarding the powder dispenser, it's an RCBS something that came with the supreme kit. The handle does meet resistance at about the midpoint of its movement as it apparently grinds the powder a bit. I don't know what that means though.

Now I'm thinking about an ultrasonic cleaner, not only to use with brass but to clean small parts so I can get dual use out of it. I think this part of the hobby is worse on the wallet than the guns....

Sten Freak fucked around with this message at 13:21 on Jul 1, 2011

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


GroovinPickle posted:

Get the Lee Universal Decapping die. I got one to replace my RCBS decapping die, which would only occasionally break a pin, but when it did it was sometimes a pain in the rear end to remove due to the design.

I just ordered the lyman universal decapping die (and some spare decapping pins). I hope it is decent.

Just as well that this happened because I needed an excuse to put down an order for a case trimmer and some more mtm boxes anyway. With a decapping die as well I thought gently caress it and placed the order.

lifenomad
May 8, 2009




I am sure that this has been covered in depth elsewhere, but as a beginner the equipment needed is pretty misleading. Obviously as a beginner "kits" are desirable, as well as a nice price point in case it doesn't get used often. At this point I am in a dilemma as to what press kit to get based on the volume of ammo I go through, which is around 1k a year of 9mm.

Progressive, single stage, turret which would be the most versatile and efficient to use? I want to start with 9mm but I very well may begin to reload in 30-06 or 7.5x55.

I know that Lee isn't The Greatest, but the price is right. $130 for a single stage with dies, $160 for a progressive with dies, or $100 for a turret without dies.

Any thoughts TFR, for a budding reloader?

Comfy sponk
Mar 30, 2007



lifenomad posted:

I am sure that this has been covered in depth elsewhere, but as a beginner the equipment needed is pretty misleading. Obviously as a beginner "kits" are desirable, as well as a nice price point in case it doesn't get used often. At this point I am in a dilemma as to what press kit to get based on the volume of ammo I go through, which is around 1k a year of 9mm.

Progressive, single stage, turret which would be the most versatile and efficient to use? I want to start with 9mm but I very well may begin to reload in 30-06 or 7.5x55.

I know that Lee isn't The Greatest, but the price is right. $130 for a single stage with dies, $160 for a progressive with dies, or $100 for a turret without dies.

Any thoughts TFR, for a budding reloader?

I would suggest the RCBS kit http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=646599 if just for the addition of the powder measure.

Yes it does cost more, but the items in this kit are more likely to not need to be replaced/upgraded right away.

Then there's the Hornady kit http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=749997. Again more expensive, but includes the ability to quick change the dies like the Lee kit.

If I were going to redo my reloading kit, it would be one of these to start. This is coming from someone who really hates himself, I've reloaded close to 2000 9mm with the lee hand press.

Comfy sponk fucked around with this message at 17:28 on Jul 1, 2011

poopgiggle
Feb 7, 2006

it isn't easy being a cross dominate shooter.




I want a progressive press eventually but I'm not sure I'll be able to shell out for a nice Dillon for a while and I was thinking about getting one of the Lee progressives. They obviously aren't as nice as the Dillon, but are they worse enough that using one will make me hate my life?

Schmoli
Apr 21, 2002

Bunson is my hero.

poopgiggle posted:

I want a progressive press eventually but I'm not sure I'll be able to shell out for a nice Dillon for a while and I was thinking about getting one of the Lee progressives. They obviously aren't as nice as the Dillon, but are they worse enough that using one will make me hate my life?

I'm several thousand rounds of .40 into my Lee Classic Turret (got it from Kempf, good kit).. While I lust after a progressive, this still manages to keep me shooting at the range and at IPSC at least twice a month. I'm into a pretty good groove where I can sit down and do 100 rounds in an hour. and that's with a lot of powder charge/oal double-checks. (and almost all rounds plop into a gage before going into the 'done' bin).

I plan on getting a 650 at some point and using that for my .40 and keeping the turret for less-used calibers.

Schmoli fucked around with this message at 19:41 on Jul 1, 2011

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


I made something

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Schmoli posted:

I'm several thousand rounds of .40 into my Lee Classic Turret (got it from Kempf, good kit)..

This is what I have it is a a great all around press. The priming system makes you crazy but for the money it cant be beat.

Pursus
Nov 27, 2007

Hook on!


lifenomad posted:

I am sure that this has been covered in depth elsewhere, but as a beginner the equipment needed is pretty misleading. Obviously as a beginner "kits" are desirable, as well as a nice price point in case it doesn't get used often. At this point I am in a dilemma as to what press kit to get based on the volume of ammo I go through, which is around 1k a year of 9mm.

Progressive, single stage, turret which would be the most versatile and efficient to use? I want to start with 9mm but I very well may begin to reload in 30-06 or 7.5x55.

I know that Lee isn't The Greatest, but the price is right. $130 for a single stage with dies, $160 for a progressive with dies, or $100 for a turret without dies.

Any thoughts TFR, for a budding reloader?

Peep the OP. It specifically lays out the differences of the types of presses and exactly what you need to get started.

The only thing I didn't go over is the turret press, which is just a single stage with a rotating tool-head. You put in one shell, do the first die, rotate it to the second die, do that one, etc. It's a bit more automated than a single-stage, because you're not doing a batch on one die, switching dies, then putting the batch through the second die, etc. You're still pulling the handle 2-4x per shell and only doing one at a time, though. The progressive is where you really get into that assembly line efficiency.

poopgiggle posted:

I want a progressive press eventually but I'm not sure I'll be able to shell out for a nice Dillon for a while and I was thinking about getting one of the Lee progressives. They obviously aren't as nice as the Dillon, but are they worse enough that using one will make me hate my life?
If you really want to start on the cheap, you can grab the Lee single stage press and then use it as a dedicated de-priming or swaging station when you replace it with a fancy progressive later on.

There was a bit of misunderstanding/disagreement in the last thread about the quality of Lee stuff. The long and the short of it is that their stuff isn't non-functional, it's just lower quality (as you'd expect for the price). The press body will be made out of aluminum instead of cast iron, or the scale will be made out of stamped metal instead of a slick casting. Their stuff will work, and for the price, it's a great way to try it out if you're not quite sure if you're going to stick with reloading. If you're absolutely positively sure you are 100% going to reload long term, buy right and buy once.

Either way, stay away from the hand presses and classic kits and stuff. Those are far enough away from the real thing that you may as well just spend the $100 on the cheapest single stage you can find.

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



I have a 550 for 9mm and .223, got it for real cheap from the estate of a dead guy. Otherwise I probably would have gotten the Lee turret as well.

For everything else I use the Co-Ax, which I really can't praise enough, and which I incidentally also got on the cheap, from a gun magazine that filed for bankruptcy and sold out all their reloading tools.

I'm a reloading vulture.

Uncle Caveman
Jun 16, 2006

I'm sorry, I can't hear you over the sound of how awesome I am.


pursus posted:

The press body will be made out of aluminum instead of cast iron...
To be fair, some Lee presses are aluminum and some are cast iron.

poopgiggle
Feb 7, 2006

it isn't easy being a cross dominate shooter.




Pursus posted:

If you really want to start on the cheap, you can grab the Lee single stage press and then use it as a dedicated de-priming or swaging station when you replace it with a fancy progressive later on.

There was a bit of misunderstanding/disagreement in the last thread about the quality of Lee stuff. The long and the short of it is that their stuff isn't non-functional, it's just lower quality (as you'd expect for the price). The press body will be made out of aluminum instead of cast iron, or the scale will be made out of stamped metal instead of a slick casting. Their stuff will work, and for the price, it's a great way to try it out if you're not quite sure if you're going to stick with reloading. If you're absolutely positively sure you are 100% going to reload long term, buy right and buy once.

Either way, stay away from the hand presses and classic kits and stuff. Those are far enough away from the real thing that you may as well just spend the $100 on the cheapest single stage you can find.

I think you misunderstood me. I posted this on page one:

poopgiggle posted:

I'm in the middle of loading ammo for an IDPA shoot tomorrow and I'd just like to remind everyone that loading pistol ammo in any kind of volume on a single stage press will make you hate your life. When I move into a place large enough to fit a proper reloading bench, I'm ordering a Dillon 550.

I have a single stage press and I've been reloading with it for about a year now. I just want a press that's less soul-crushingly tedious to reload on.

To clarify: I'm not looking for something that will last for 30 years necessarily, just something that will work until I finish my PhD because then I'll have real money to fritter away on hobbies. I just want to know if the Lee progressives are a pain to use (tricky about timing or primer feeding, for example) or if they're easy to break.

poopgiggle fucked around with this message at 02:31 on Jul 3, 2011

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON




"Two is one and one is none" does not apply to powder charging.

Comfy sponk
Mar 30, 2007



thermobollocks posted:




"Two is one and one is none" does not apply to powder charging.

drat. Any injuries? how did the gun fare?

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

Comfy sponk posted:

drat. Any injuries? how did the gun fare?

I have a wicked blood blister on my trigger finger, and the extractor cut my face a but, but otherwise, no, by some miracle.

The chamber is bulged, so they're going to have to replace that. The extractor and mag catch are gone, and there's a few bits in the slide assembly I'm not familiar with that they're going to have to replace as well. The trigger is cracked.

However, the local gunsmiths are confident the slide, frame, and most of the triggery guts are fine.

Oh, and the magazine that was in it might be a little scorched.

Absolut_V
Oct 8, 2003

Superman That Jones!

Picked up an MEC Sizemaster, extra charging bars, a brand new RCBS Uniflow, and 10 rounds of .270 for $30.00 from a Sunday-only old-man garage sale. I don't think anyone died either. He had over half a dozen more presses and told me he was just selling this one because it was an extra.

He also invited me to come shoot black powder with him and the "Red River Renegades". Awesome morning.

Pursus
Nov 27, 2007

Hook on!


poopgiggle posted:

I think you misunderstood me. I posted this on page one:

I have a single stage press and I've been reloading with it for about a year now. I just want a press that's less soul-crushingly tedious to reload on.

To clarify: I'm not looking for something that will last for 30 years necessarily, just something that will work until I finish my PhD because then I'll have real money to fritter away on hobbies. I just want to know if the Lee progressives are a pain to use (tricky about timing or primer feeding, for example) or if they're easy to break.

Sorry dude, I wasn't paying enough attention. I've never used a Lee progressive myself but to make up for it I'll do a bit of research. I just took a look at some of the specs of the Lee Pro 1000 ($170 one), it's a three station press. This means that you have to use the Lee dies specifically, because the Lee belling die is also the thing that the powder measure drops through. Not a huge problem since each kit comes with one set of dies unless you already load for a few calibers and you don't want to replace a few sets.

Here's a three star review from http://www.midwayusa.com/Search/#lee%20progressive%20kit____-_1-2-4_8-16-32 that goes into some of the peculiarities of this press.

Kevin Pratt of Longview, TX posted:

This was my first progressive loader. I used one for about 10 years before I got wise. It's a GREAT machine when it's brand new. I could load well over 1000 rnds/hour when it came out of the box. Caliber conversions weren't all that tough if you bought all the extras (shell plate carrier KIT) etc. But after only about 10,000 rnds it started to have problems. Before I finally got rid of it I was down to about 300 rnds hour. Every few rounds it would jam. The Shell plate carriers (even after replacing all the movements) would come out of alignment and would require adjusting. The Auto Powder measure caused me no end of hassle at the range. When using the little plastic discs and trying to come up with a light load, the powder would develop a static charge and cling to the hole in the disc and NO powder or only a partial load would make it into the shell. I gave up on light loads until I got a Dillon. The primer feed would jam all the time. Even when it was still pretty new I started having problems with it. See, the whole way the thing feeds brass and primers is by vibrations. There are notches milled in one of the pillars and a piece of spring steel that's mounted to the shell plate carrier housing. As you move the lever up and down, the little rod "bounces" along the milled places. That causes the primers to fall and the brass to feed. The thing is, if a primer is already in place (like when you've got a full load, or even a 1/2 load in the tray) it tends to vibrate the whole machine so much that it flips the primer either sideways or upside down. And since it's recessed the whole time, you never see it until it's too late.... This is a good, cheap machine for a beginner. But go slow, and don't wear it out too fast.

To be fair, there's quite a few 5-star ones that say it works great, I just chose this one because it seemed more specific about the actual pros/cons.

Pursus fucked around with this message at 15:20 on Jul 3, 2011

ZebraBlade
Mar 26, 2010

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark

I got 500 rounds of .45 blazer brass for free. Turns out it uses small pistol primers, what the gently caress. I got my 550 all set up for .45 and I have no usable brass.

B4Ctom1
Oct 5, 2003

OVERWORKED COCK


Slippery Tilde

I kept this out of this thread but there is a nice review of bullet pulling tools
http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3422826

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

ZebraBlade posted:

I got 500 rounds of .45 blazer brass for free. Turns out it uses small pistol primers, what the gently caress. I got my 550 all set up for .45 and I have no usable brass.

You can't tweak the priming tool to stick in small pistol primers? I don't know much about progressives.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Cast bullets for the first time ever today. Had lots of rejects and the acceptable ones where so and so as well, despite the melt and mold itself being of proper temps (750/350-380F), but I think I realize what the problem was, the sprue plate was probably cooler than the mold itself, next time I will pay extra attention to getting it hot.

The mold drops bullets at .434" but it sizes down to .430" well:


A few unsized ones, I noted that the tops on some have got a sort of beginning to a HP going on, thats the flat nose pins on the block seating a bit too high, not sure if thats a big deal or not, one some its the other way around:


Well next up is panlubing and loading some.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


thermobollocks posted:

You can't tweak the priming tool to stick in small pistol primers? I don't know much about progressives.

You change out 2 pieces when changing between big and small primers on the 550. The primer tube and the little thing holding the primers when inserting them into the casing. Takes about 1 minute to change. 2 screws basically.

ZebraBlade
Mar 26, 2010

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark

thermobollocks posted:

You can't tweak the priming tool to stick in small pistol primers? I don't know much about progressives.

I would but I am out of small pistol primers and I have like 6k large pistol primers. I ended up loading 800 rounds using mixed brass for a upcoming USPSA level 3 (lost brass) match. I just drove to the range where I RO and sorted the brass and took what I wanted. There are 10 RO's and only 3 of us load, and I am the only one that loads pistol, and we are welcome to any and all the brass left by people, so the majority of my brass is once or twice fired. I have a good collection of calibers I do not load so one of these days I will post up what I have and whoever wants can pay shipping and have it.

ZebraBlade fucked around with this message at 03:26 on Jul 4, 2011

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

Heintron posted:

You change out 2 pieces when changing between big and small primers on the 550. The primer tube and the little thing holding the primers when inserting them into the casing. Takes about 1 minute to change. 2 screws basically.

So, aside from having to work out a load that does well with small pistol primers, it's not a problem.

Also, His Divine Shadow god drat freshly cast bullets look nice.

BadgerMan45
Dec 30, 2009


ZebraBlade posted:

I got 500 rounds of .45 blazer brass for free. Turns out it uses small pistol primers, what the gently caress. I got my 550 all set up for .45 and I have no usable brass.

Yeah, you've got to watch out for that nowadays. I've seen that with WWB as well, though I'm not sure what the reason is, I guess it simplifies matters for them by using the same primer for 9/40/45.

ZebraBlade
Mar 26, 2010

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark

I did a little looking and it seems nearly all non-toxic .45 uses small pistol primers.

Absolut_V
Oct 8, 2003

Superman That Jones!

Odd; is it easy to find load data for small pistol primers? All my .45 brass is large primer but I would actually prefer to only have to keep one type of pistol primer on hand.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


A local gunshop got this:


US surplus .50 BMG

So is this any good? Will the brass work for reloading? Does anyone know?

Kennebago
Nov 12, 2007

van de schande is bevrijd
hij die met walkuren rijd


Pursus posted:

It's a bit more automated than a single-stage, because you're not doing a batch on one die, switching dies, then putting the batch through the second die, etc.

One of the things I think is cool about the Lee turret press is that you can disable the auto index and poof, it's a single stage.

I don't know how useful that is because I'm still waiting for my pistol permit to come in so I can start loading 9mm, but I'm dying to find out!

B4Ctom1
Oct 5, 2003

OVERWORKED COCK


Slippery Tilde

Heintron posted:

A local gunshop got this:


US surplus .50 BMG

So is this any good? Will the brass work for reloading? Does anyone know?

Yes, it is reloadable.

It looks like it could be the 1950's surplus I have seen for sale here in the US. It is mildly corrosive, so clean the cases and rifle not long after shooting.

I don't know what primers you can get but it uses boxer primers. The most sought after primers in the USA are RWS primers so hopefully you could get them. But Tula also makes 50 BMG primers if you can't get any others.

Vitavouri 20N29 is the best powder on the planet and is used by match shooters in the USA.

With US made brass, RWS primers, vitavouri powder.. if you can get Lapua or other european 50 BMG projectiles you can build some of the finest match ammo in the world. Also there are european 50 BMG competitions, I have read about them.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


B4Ctom1 posted:

Yes, it is reloadable.

It looks like it could be the 1950's surplus I have seen for sale here in the US. It is mildly corrosive, so clean the cases and rifle not long after shooting.

I don't know what primers you can get but it uses boxer primers. The most sought after primers in the USA are RWS primers so hopefully you could get them. But Tula also makes 50 BMG primers if you can't get any others.

Vitavouri 20N29 is the best powder on the planet and is used by match shooters in the USA.

With US made brass, RWS primers, vitavouri powder.. if you can get Lapua or other european 50 BMG projectiles you can build some of the finest match ammo in the world. Also there are european 50 BMG competitions, I have read about them.

Good info!
I have a source for 20N29 vv powder. But I have never even heard of RWS primers before. Only primers I know of for .50 BMG is the CCI 35.

I found the Bullex-N from Lapua. But which one should I go for? 750 or 800gr? 800gr seems a bit heavy Also god drat they are expensive!

I would like a nice load for hunting as well. Do you know of any expanding bullet? Barnes solids? I found this warning on the Barnes page, "*NOT for use in standard throat 50 BMG rifles." What does that mean?

Btw I will use a heinrich fortmeier .50 BMG custom version of a steyr HS 50 with a 833mm barrel, single shot.

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



Did you get a press that fits?

The old Norwegian gun magazine Våpenjournalen had an article about loading .50 BMG from ten or so years back, you might wanna check with someone at Norwegian-language gun board Kammeret if anyone has a copy of it and can provide a scan or some kind of synopsis. It was written by Eirik Moen, a salty old reloading wizard who's developed a lot of the loads for Ladeboken, the Norwegian reloading bible (get it now if you haven't, there's a shitload of good advice on everything in reloading in it).

I can't loving believe I live in a country where they outlawed the .50 BMG . loving clowns.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


Sjurygg posted:

Did you get a press that fits?

The old Norwegian gun magazine Våpenjournalen had an article about loading .50 BMG from ten or so years back, you might wanna check with someone at Norwegian-language gun board Kammeret if anyone has a copy of it and can provide a scan or some kind of synopsis. It was written by Eirik Moen, a salty old reloading wizard who's developed a lot of the loads for Ladeboken, the Norwegian reloading bible (get it now if you haven't, there's a shitload of good advice on everything in reloading in it).

I can't loving believe I live in a country where they outlawed the .50 BMG . loving clowns.

I will try to find this book.

Why did they outlaw the .50?

In other news, I found a distributor for RWS primers and Lapua bullets which coincidently has the nice vv powder as well. And they charge slightly less than $rape.

Yond Cassius
May 22, 2010

horny is prohibited

Absolut_V posted:

Odd; is it easy to find load data for small pistol primers? All my .45 brass is large primer but I would actually prefer to only have to keep one type of pistol primer on hand.

A friend of mine just uses the same load data as for large pistol primers (I don't have a .45 so I can't say for myself). He says he loses a little velocity off of the trade (25ish fps), but for plinking purposes it doesn't really matter.

B4Ctom1
Oct 5, 2003

OVERWORKED COCK


Slippery Tilde

Heintron posted:

Good info!
I have a source for 20N29 vv powder. But I have never even heard of RWS primers before. Only primers I know of for .50 BMG is the CCI 35.

I found the Bullex-N from Lapua. But which one should I go for? 750 or 800gr? 800gr seems a bit heavy Also god drat they are expensive!

I would like a nice load for hunting as well. Do you know of any expanding bullet? Barnes solids? I found this warning on the Barnes page, "*NOT for use in standard throat 50 BMG rifles." What does that mean?

Btw I will use a heinrich fortmeier .50 BMG custom version of a steyr HS 50 with a 833mm barrel, single shot.

If you can get CCI 35 that is fine, I just wanted to let you know that the RWS if available to you, are considered the finest match primers ever.

750 is standard match bullet weight. If Lapua is really expensive, I know there are other european match bullet makers which may be cheaper, so take your time and shop around. These guys might know who http://www.fcsa-swiss.com/

Generally expanding 50 BMG bullets are not used for hunting. But to satisfy legal requirements they are sold with tips that have some exposed lead, or a hollow hole, or a hollow hole filled with some other material like aluminum.

If you can get Hornady Amax bullets, they are long match profile, are 750 grains, but also satisfy the requirement for "expanding bullet" hunting laws at least here in the US by being a ballistic tipped hollow-point hunting bullet. The difference is instead of using a plastic ballistic tip they use an aluminum tip for consistency and and to maintain the match profile.

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



Heintron posted:

I will try to find this book.

https://www.ladeboken.no

Heintron posted:

Why did they outlaw the .50?


Because the Norwegian Police Directorate are territorial dipshits and dumbfucks.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


B4Ctom1 posted:

If you can get CCI 35 that is fine, I just wanted to let you know that the RWS if available to you, are considered the finest match primers ever.

750 is standard match bullet weight. If Lapua is really expensive, I know there are other european match bullet makers which may be cheaper, so take your time and shop around. These guys might know who http://www.fcsa-swiss.com/

Generally expanding 50 BMG bullets are not used for hunting. But to satisfy legal requirements they are sold with tips that have some exposed lead, or a hollow hole, or a hollow hole filled with some other material like aluminum.

If you can get Hornady Amax bullets, they are long match profile, are 750 grains, but also satisfy the requirement for "expanding bullet" hunting laws at least here in the US by being a ballistic tipped hollow-point hunting bullet. The difference is instead of using a plastic ballistic tip they use an aluminum tip for consistency and and to maintain the match profile.


The guys over at http://www.shooting-supplies.eu/ told me that they could get me good prices on .50 bmg bullets. I will check with them. Make a little calculation, have a look at my bank account. Cry a bit. Then pew pew until I am happy again.

Sjurygg posted:

https://www.ladeboken.no



Because the Norwegian Police Directorate are territorial dipshits and dumbfucks.

Good news! I found the book!
Bad news. Norway sucks.

Lono was taken
Aug 26, 2006

This is Detective Faggot Mulder, they want to shut down the Ass Files.


http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=217484?cm_cat=Cart&cm_pla=ProductDesc Will I need any dies other than this one for reloading 454? I'm having a hard time figuring out whether or not this die both sizes the case and seats the bullet at once.

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Yond Cassius
May 22, 2010

horny is prohibited

Lono was taken posted:

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=217484?cm_cat=Cart&cm_pla=ProductDesc Will I need any dies other than this one for reloading 454? I'm having a hard time figuring out whether or not this die both sizes the case and seats the bullet at once.

The FCD doesn't do either of those things. It takes a loaded round and applies a little bit of a crimp to it.

You want this set here, which has a die for resizing, a die for belling, and a die for seating. The FCD is an extra.

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