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human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



Is it a bad idea to buy reloading presses and other equipment off ebay? I'm seeing prices on there that are significantly lower than Amazon.

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Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



Presses are sturdy and mechanically simple things. It's perfectly fine to buy used.

I usually recommend the RCBS Rockchucker for new reloaders. It's a solid and inexpensive single stage, and starting out on a single stage gives you a good understanding of the entire process.

And even if you later decide you want a progressive, having a spare single stage is always useful.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

Prof. Banks posted:

I gotta disagree with this. $1,000 is more than enough for equipment.* It's not going to buy you a fully automated Dillon that can crank out a couple thousand rounds an hour, but it will go pretty far. My initial setup was something like $95. Now that was a hand press, so not what someone who wants to load a few hundred rounds a month ideally needs. However, $1000 will get a nice single stage or a decent turret, dies, shell holders, all the basic prep tools, and even one of those fancy automatic powder dispensers and leave you with cash to spare.

* I haven't looked at equipment in like 6 months so poo poo might have gone ham.

The OP specifically was asking about a $1,000 budget for all necessary equipment required to immediately start reloading three or four different cartridges. At least, that's how I read it. Including components and totally avoiding Lee will make that hard right now. RCBS single- stage kits alone are $400 - $500, and you still don't have dies, holders, primers, bullets, or powder.

If they didn't mean components, then yeah, you could get all the necessary non-Lee equipment needed to reload for a couple of pistol and rifle calibers for under a kilodollar. Maybe.

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


I just read an article in Sports Afield magazine where they were talking about how at the current time its almost impossible to make primers by machine. They need to be ummm "packed" by hand.

Wa11y
Jul 23, 2002

Did I say "cookies?" I meant, "Fire in your face!"

This video's only 5 years old and it shows the primer compound "pellet" being formed by a person and dropped into the cases, so yeah, it looks like there's still a human workflow bottleneck there. Not working in the cartridge manufacturer industry, I have no judgment on why they're still doing it that way, but I imagine if they could safely and effectively automate the process, they would have by now, even if it were just automation with human monitoring.

Coxswain Balls
Jun 3, 2001



I never thought of it but I can see how a process involving tiny, sensitive contact explosives could be tricky enough that you would want a human in control of things rather than a machine.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

Coxswain Balls posted:

I never thought of it but I can see how a process involving tiny, sensitive contact explosives could be tricky enough that you would want a human in control of things rather than a machine.

It also explains why you have primers, and match primers, and match competition ultra primers, and long distance bench rest match competition champion ultra mega hyper primers, etc. Any time there is a human element, you will have an A team, a B team, a C team, etc.

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


To add a little bit more to primer chat, a few quotes from the article:


"The mixture of elements in primers is essentially an explosive. It is mixed and kept under water, and resembles modelling clay or silly putty".

"If you visit a shotshell loading plant, you'll see that they have loaders that can spit out shot shells at the rate of 900 shells per minute! So why are primers the problem? Because they are actually handmade. Because of the volatile nature of the priming compound,s there is no machine that can make primers".

"Sequestered in these special facilities are workers who, through experience, can tell if that day's priming mixture is too dry or too wet by the feel of the first tray or two that they load. Primers are then encased in a metal cup".

"Through the black powder age, and its transition to smokeless powder, primers were highly corrosive because they contained potassium chlorate, which after firing became potassium chloride".

"It wasn't until 1936 that Remington launched its Kleenbore primers, that primers ceased to be something that pitted gun barrels even with careful cleaning".

"The final refinement was the removal of Lead Styphnate as one of the original components of the priming mixture, which came about in the early 1980s.


Sports Afield Magazine, May/June 2021 Pages 18, 19

Wa11y
Jul 23, 2002

Did I say "cookies?" I meant, "Fire in your face!"

AmbassadorofSodomy posted:

To add a little bit more to primer chat, a few quotes from the article:

"The final refinement was the removal of Lead Styphnate as one of the original components of the priming mixture, which came about in the early 1980s.

Sports Afield Magazine, May/June 2021 Pages 18, 19

Well, I guess I need to find out what's commonly used today, if lead styphnate hasn't been used in most of 40 years.

Edit: I wonder if they're specifically referring to lead free primers, which as far as I know never really took off? Some searching online is still referencing lead styphnate as recently as 2018.

Wa11y fucked around with this message at 15:12 on Apr 25, 2021

Coxswain Balls
Jun 3, 2001



Wa11y posted:

Well, I guess I need to find out what's commonly used today, if lead styphnate hasn't been used in most of 40 years.

Here's a good article I found the last time I was interested in primer chemistry, and it looks like it was just updated yesterday.

quote:

The problem was first solved in the early 1980s by Geco, who released a zinc- and titanium - based primer which they called " Sintox'. Since then, there have been a number of other lead-free primers produced by, for example, CCI Blazer, Speer, Federal and Winchester (Haag, 1995). The exact composition of the priming compounds used is not available, although SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray) analysis generally shows the presence of strontium in the Speer and Blazer cartridges, potassium in the Winchester cartridges and calcium and silicon in the Federal cartridges.

Most of the more recent primer formulations contain an initiator explosive compound called 'dinol', the chemical name of which is DDNP (diazodinitrophenol).

It still sounds like you can assume most stuff out there is lead styphnate unless it's explicitly states otherwise. On Federal's website, for example:

quote:

Accuracy Starts At Ignition

They call it B-lead styphnate, but in plain English, it's the fuel our primers use to achieve their world-renowned quality. All Premium loads feature the finest primers, which are subjected to more frequent inspections for dimensional tolerances and charge weight to ensure they deliver consistent ignition for every shot. We also load select products with our exclusive Catalyst primer. Its lead-free technology provides the most reliable, consistent ignition possible.

ZebraBlade
Mar 26, 2010

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark

If these companies go through this much trouble with safety measures for making primers I dont want to be doing that poo poo in my basement.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_O9gSKFguU#t=228s Skip to 3:47 for primers

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


The facility in question was a Winchester-Olin plant in Illinois IIRC (don't have the article in front of me).

I'm sure some companies might still use it. I don't think this was meant to be an all encompassing state of the primers address.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

AmbassadorofSodomy posted:

The facility in question was a Winchester-Olin plant in Illinois IIRC (don't have the article in front of me).

I'm sure some companies might still use it. I don't think this was meant to be an all encompassing state of the primers address.

I live about five minutes from that plant. And, about five more from the brass plant, which used to be Olin, then it was spun off into Olin Brass, and now it's something else.

Thermos
Mar 29, 2019



tarlibone posted:

It also explains why you have primers, and match primers, and match competition ultra primers, and long distance bench rest match competition champion ultra mega hyper primers, etc. Any time there is a human element, you will have an A team, a B team, a C team, etc.

No idea if it's true but I recall reading somewhere that the only difference between CCI regular and benchrest primers is the person who was operating the machine that day. I always thought that was cool.

Bob Mundon
Dec 1, 2003
Your Friendly Neighborhood Gun Nut

Kind of on the nose for the latest conversations here.

https://youtu.be/IjtZyDrATdA


His channel is more rifle reloading centric, but most of it applies to pistol as well. Have and still use several of the items he talks about, not everything listed is going to be ideal but it'll work. I even still use my Lee hand press time to time, and started loading rifle rounds with it. FA priming kit and Lyman case prep tool he mentions are rock solid too, still my main go to's.

If you have the cash though and can find one, something in the ballpark of a Rock Chucker is going to be a serious upgrade.




Also, if you are thinking about making your own primers, stop and find a new hobby. Seriously, that's one of the craziest things I've ever heard. Just no.

knuthgrush
Jun 25, 2008

Be brave; clench fists.



That video mentioned the Lee Loader. I'd never seen one of those before. It looks a bit tedious but I might only be loading 50 or so rounds at a time and only ever 9mm luger or 5.45x39. Would it be a completely silly idea to get two Lee Loader kits?

EDIT -

Well actually they say they don't work for semi-auto firearms? We've already discussed the nuances of 5.45 but if I wanted to start out with 9mm would the lee breech lock hand press kit be a bad initial route?

SUPER MEGA DOUBLE EDIT -

Looks like the 9mm classic loader will indeed work in semi-autos but boy howdy does beating on/around a primer with a hammer make me nervous just thinking about it...

knuthgrush fucked around with this message at 23:29 on Apr 25, 2021

Problematic Soup
Feb 18, 2007

My soup has malfunctioned?





https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1013017131

If you want something easily portable for small volume loading, you would probably be vastly happier with the Lee hand loader. It’s more, yes, but the Lee Loader kits are probably going to become extremely tedious in short order.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

Problematic Soup posted:

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1013017131

If you want something easily portable for small volume loading, you would probably be vastly happier with the Lee hand loader. It’s more, yes, but the Lee Loader kits are probably going to become extremely tedious in short order.

My first kit was the Challenger or Anniversary one (whichever kit has the hand primer; otherwise, the kits are identical), and while I still think I made the right choice for me, it was suggested to me that I get the hand press when I posted here for the first time, asking about the Lee Loader. I did get a hand press at one point, and I've used it for small volume loading when I want to load in my living room, or when I want to load a small handful of rounds to use up the last of my components. Its main use, though, is when I want to decap a bunch of brass: I set up shop in my living room, get the shell holders I need, get my universal decapper, and have at it.

If you just want to dip your toes in reloading, the hand press is your best value. And, the really cool thing is that if you start with it and decide you want to move up to a bench-mounted press (single stage, turret, progressive, etc.), then the cartridge-specific accessories you bought for your hand press--shell holders, dies, etc.--will almost certainly be compatible with your new, better press.




Oh, and before I end this post:
The Reloading Thread: Welcome to the hobby. Good luck finding primers.

Bob Mundon
Dec 1, 2003
Your Friendly Neighborhood Gun Nut

knuthgrush posted:

That video mentioned the Lee Loader. I'd never seen one of those before. It looks a bit tedious but I might only be loading 50 or so rounds at a time and only ever 9mm luger or 5.45x39. Would it be a completely silly idea to get two Lee Loader kits?

EDIT -

Well actually they say they don't work for semi-auto firearms? We've already discussed the nuances of 5.45 but if I wanted to start out with 9mm would the lee breech lock hand press kit be a bad initial route?

SUPER MEGA DOUBLE EDIT -

Looks like the 9mm classic loader will indeed work in semi-autos but boy howdy does beating on/around a primer with a hammer make me nervous just thinking about it...


There's veey little reason to go with the Lee loader. Hand press will be tedious enough with pistol, but as mentioned all your dies and other bits transfer over. Their breech lock and classic presses will probably be better, but I used the hand press for priming/depriming loooong after graduating on to other stuff so it's a nice option to dip your toes at a minimum cost.

With pistol too, make sure to spend the money on carbide dies. Being able to skip lube altogether is a big advantage. No way around it for rifle, but that's a different ballgame.

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


tarlibone posted:

My first kit was the Challenger or Anniversary one (whichever kit has the hand primer; otherwise, the kits are identical), and while I still think I made the right choice for me, it was suggested to me that I get the hand press when I posted here for the first time, asking about the Lee Loader. I did get a hand press at one point, and I've used it for small volume loading when I want to load in my living room, or when I want to load a small handful of rounds to use up the last of my components. Its main use, though, is when I want to decap a bunch of brass: I set up shop in my living room, get the shell holders I need, get my universal decapper, and have at it.

If you just want to dip your toes in reloading, the hand press is your best value. And, the really cool thing is that if you start with it and decide you want to move up to a bench-mounted press (single stage, turret, progressive, etc.), then the cartridge-specific accessories you bought for your hand press--shell holders, dies, etc.--will almost certainly be compatible with your new, better press.




Oh, and before I end this post:
The Reloading Thread: Welcome to the hobby. Good luck finding primers.

Well, the current title does smell a new title.

Speaking of primers, I know you can't reload rimfire, but do rimfire cartridges use different primers?
IIRC, its a liquid is it not? They put a couple drops on the shell and then spin it to distribute it around the rim, and then it solidifies?

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

AmbassadorofSodomy posted:

Well, the current title does smell a new title.

Speaking of primers, I know you can't reload rimfire, but do rimfire cartridges use different primers?
IIRC, its a liquid is it not? They put a couple drops on the shell and then spin it to distribute it around the rim, and then it solidifies?


Yup that's correct.

Not sure if it's a different primer compound or not? But there is a higher % of silica in the compound than centerfire primers to help with ignition reliability.

Time Crisis Actor
Apr 28, 2002


I sexually identify as a fat tinder girl,

Yeah lemme just clean my pannus first.

These candles smell amazing btw


Coxswain Balls posted:

I've been happy with my Lee Classic turret press with the auto index for both high volume 9mm reloading and low volume rifle rounds. Even with extras it came to $500 and I've never felt wanting for something fancier. Only thing it can't do is swage primer pockets without fiddling, but that's just because the pocket swager I use is specifically designed for single-stage presses.

For a bench all you need is something sturdy enough to handle the press force without flexing. My buddy who got me into reloading has been using a Black and Decker workmate folding bench for years in his apartment.



What are you using to mount it to the bench?

darnon
Nov 8, 2009


Looks like Lee's quick mount bench plate.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

darnon posted:

Looks like Lee's quick mount bench plate.

Yep. I have a couple of them. They're pretty great.


Coxswain Balls posted:

I've been happy with my Lee Classic turret press with the auto index for both high volume 9mm reloading and low volume rifle rounds. Even with extras it came to $500 and I've never felt wanting for something fancier. Only thing it can't do is swage primer pockets without fiddling, but that's just because the pocket swager I use is specifically designed for single-stage presses.

For a bench all you need is something sturdy enough to handle the press force without flexing. My buddy who got me into reloading has been using a Black and Decker workmate folding bench for years in his apartment.



... that doesn't look like my Classic Turret. I'll get a picture. That looks more like a progressive setup.

Coxswain Balls
Jun 3, 2001



I said that's my friend's setup, not mine. I built my bench out of the running surface from the treadmill I tore apart to build a wet tumbler.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqkWcFlecNI

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



Interesting article about making homemade primers.

https://www.ammoland.com/2021/03/make-home-made-ammunition-caps-primers-ghost-ammo/#axzz6tAm2Q8ws

I think it could be safe to try out if you only use enough material for one or two primers at a time, with adequate hand, eye, and ear protection. Worst case is it blows up, but there would be too little of it to do any damage.

Coxswain Balls
Jun 3, 2001



For the Canadians here, Campro projectiles are starting to get restocked. Just got a notification email so I snatched up a thousand 308s.

Oddhair
Mar 21, 2004



human garbage bag posted:

Ok, that's what I feared, it seems like it's not cost effective to get into reloading right now because of primer costs. So is it not worth it to reload "cheap" ammo like 9mm or 7.62x54r? What about 30-06? .50 BMG?

Midway has had .50 BMG primers in stock, but 500 of them are $483 or so. I tried to find a link but they're apparently also sold out now, and they were one of the only primers in stock.

Lehigh defense has been making more of their solid copper bullets, I was able to grab some 50-count boxes of the 65 grain 9mm/.380, 100 grain .38 special and 120 grain .38 special.

Also, heading back to Pasadena for another gun show this weekend. I had the ammo can with my old-rear end IMR powders and a mess of .25 caliber projectiles with me last time, I maybe could have sold/traded them. Was a surprising amount of brass on display, maybe I can locate some extra .38, and I really should have scooped the Accurate I saw for $35 but they were having CC problems. I don't have any load info for the 65 grain Lehigh bullets that match any powder I have (though they do list Accurate #5 load data for the same projectile in .380 auto with this powder as well as all the other projectiles I bought.)

Still need to set up alerts and get on the discord.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

Speaking of 50 BMG...

... over the last several months, Kentucky Ballistics (I think that's his name?) has occasionally been shooting big, hard stuff with 50 caliber SLAP rounds. These are rare, expensive rounds that are no longer manufactured, and while he assumes that they're just surplus, it's hard telling if anyone has reloaded or otherwise messed with them. ("Anyone" includes but is not limited to Father Thyme.) Back on April 9th, he was doing his thing, and then, well, the title of the video says it all: his 50 cal exploded.

I'm putting this in this in the reloading thread because I think that more than most shooters, we're the ones who should be the most aware of the dangers of kaboom. If someone wants to post this in the milsurp thread, too, go ahead. I don't follow that thread.

Just... holy freaking cow.

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


Also for Canadian reloaders. SFRC auctions has some primers for auction.
https://sfrcauctions.com/
I have no idea if they're any good or what they're for besides they are "primers".

Don't know if they're good for rifle, pistol etc..

Seamonster
Apr 30, 2007

IMMER SIEGREICH


tarlibone posted:

Speaking of 50 BMG...

... over the last several months, Kentucky Ballistics (I think that's his name?) has occasionally been shooting big, hard stuff with 50 caliber SLAP rounds. These are rare, expensive rounds that are no longer manufactured, and while he assumes that they're just surplus, it's hard telling if anyone has reloaded or otherwise messed with them. ("Anyone" includes but is not limited to Father Thyme.) Back on April 9th, he was doing his thing, and then, well, the title of the video says it all: his 50 cal exploded.

I'm putting this in this in the reloading thread because I think that more than most shooters, we're the ones who should be the most aware of the dangers of kaboom. If someone wants to post this in the milsurp thread, too, go ahead. I don't follow that thread.

Just... holy freaking cow.

I just watched that video and remembered forgottenweapons testing of surplus Turkish 8mm that cracked Ian's Kar98 stock. Except here the action became a literal frag grenade.

Just for reference, he mentions that the chamber pressure reached an estimated 85,000 PSI. The proof pressure of .50 BMG is 65,000 PSI.

EDIT: aaaand Ian just posted a video about kablammos

Seamonster fucked around with this message at 03:13 on May 1, 2021

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



tarlibone posted:

Speaking of 50 BMG...

... over the last several months, Kentucky Ballistics (I think that's his name?) has occasionally been shooting big, hard stuff with 50 caliber SLAP rounds. These are rare, expensive rounds that are no longer manufactured, and while he assumes that they're just surplus, it's hard telling if anyone has reloaded or otherwise messed with them. ("Anyone" includes but is not limited to Father Thyme.) Back on April 9th, he was doing his thing, and then, well, the title of the video says it all: his 50 cal exploded.

I'm putting this in this in the reloading thread because I think that more than most shooters, we're the ones who should be the most aware of the dangers of kaboom. If someone wants to post this in the milsurp thread, too, go ahead. I don't follow that thread.

Just... holy freaking cow.

That happened because the rifle he used had a screwed on breech I think. The odds of this happening with a bolt-action are much lower, right? Even if you filled a .50 round to the top with powder and welded the bullet to the case it would rupture the barrel, but not send shrapnel backwards.

MazeOfTzeentch
May 2, 2009

rip miso beno


human garbage bag posted:

That happened because the rifle he used had a screwed on breech I think. The odds of this happening with a bolt-action are much lower, right? Even if you filled a .50 round to the top with powder and welded the bullet to the case it would rupture the barrel, but not send shrapnel backwards.

Not necessarily, unless the bolt action is overbuilt to hilarity. In that case, the bolt's lugs would likely shear off just like the threads, and the bolt would be sent backwards by the excess bolt thrust. It would likely fly backwards into the takedown mechanism (if there is one), and shear that off if it was moving with enough velocity. So, while you might not have those receiver lugs coming back at you, you instead have a very sizable bolt and probably some different chunks of receiver coming at you. That much overpressure isn't really something you can even start to consider designing for, and most of the standard case rupture gas paths would just be overwhelmed or entirely useless, as the pressure containment ability of the gun has failed entirely.

That round was running over 30% beyond proof pressure, and over 54% beyond SAAMI pressure, as that's how strong Mark Serbu designed the gun to be. I'm sure someone can correct me here, but if I remember correctly that's kinda the industry standard for designing pressure vessels to not blow up given their designed operating parameters.

e: the amount of force *beyond* the SAAMI cartridge's bolt thrust is at least 16,000 lbf, basically the same as if you hung 2 asian elephants off of that breech plug and then pulled the trigger on a standard round (which generates about 26,000 lbf in bolt thrust. It's just an absurdly unfortunate amount of pressure and force acting on an amount of metal that was never designed for it, even with generous safety margins. Dude got insanely unlucky, and then insanely lucky, in that order.

MazeOfTzeentch fucked around with this message at 04:21 on Apr 30, 2021

SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007


Hair Elf

A threaded on plug is going to be way stronger than any bolt action. Every thread is a locking surface.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



SpartanIvy posted:

A threaded on plug is going to be way stronger than any bolt action. Every thread is a locking surface.

You sure? This bolt is pretty thick, the total area of metal that needs to be sheered off seems to be bigger for the bolt than the combined area of the screw.

MazeOfTzeentch
May 2, 2009

rip miso beno


The bolt is pretty big, yes, but there's only so much overlap with the receiver that provides the actual locking strength. So you get the area of the 2 lugs, plus the area of the bolt handle overlap in the notch where it locks.

SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007


Hair Elf

human garbage bag posted:

You sure? This bolt is pretty thick, the total area of metal that needs to be sheered off seems to be bigger for the bolt than the combined area of the screw.



Honestly I don't, because I haven't handled any 50 cal actions. However threading and interrupted threads have kind of been the goto for cannon and artillery breaches for a long time.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



SpartanIvy posted:

Honestly I don't, because I haven't handled any 50 cal actions. However threading and interrupted threads have kind of been the goto for cannon and artillery breaches for a long time.

I think that might be a weight and size issue. I'm imagining what putting a massive bolt-action cannon on a warship would look like

Hakarne
Jul 23, 2007
Vivo en el autobús!


So after a looong delay I got my press all set up and ready to start loading some .45 Colt! Since this is my first time ever with reloading I invested in a bullet puller and have been practicing on a dud round to get everything set up before I make live rounds. I feel like I'm ready to go but I have a few questions about COL and crimp. My first load will use 225gr Barnes XPB copper bullets and my load data calls for a 1.600 COL. I finally got it dialed in to 1.600 exact with the built-in crimper on my Hornady die set (https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1165122900?pid=664316 for reference) and it seems like it's crimping it juuust barely in the groove.





Should it be snug up against the top of the groove or is it ok to have it back a bit as long as it's in there? I compared it to some Remington factory bullets and those are nice and snug up to the end but they're also a much shorter COL of like 1.568 or something like that. Also how do I judge if I have a "good" crimp?

Speaking of crimps, getting that adjusted was the absolute hardest part of all this and was the reason I got so much practice with my bullet puller. I was looking to get a second die for my other (cheaper) bullets I want to use so I don't have to adjust anything now that I have it locked in. Problem is they're sold out everywhere . If I use the same brass with a different bullet, should I be able to leave the crimp set about the same even if I adjust the length? My other bullets seat to a much longer length with how I have my die dialed in. Or is the crimp distance going to have to change too? That's... probably a dumb question when I think about it but the whole crimping thing is the one part of this I'm still not fully grasping.

Edit: hosed around with it more today and had to walk away in frustration. The published load data I'm using says a 1.6" COL but gently caress that seems too long for where the groove is on the XPB. I'm able to push the bullet back further without much effort (just pushing it against a workbench by hand with moderate force). The other load data I'm looking at gives shorter COL so I guess I'll have to abandon this load and give that a shot, but that really limits what I can try.

Hakarne fucked around with this message at 20:31 on May 2, 2021

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Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



The case mouth should be roughly in the center of the groove before crimping. The crimp doesn't need to be very tight, just enough that the bullet doesn't walk itself out of the case under recoil.

Seating a bullet deeper will increase the initial pressure spike because you're decreasing the volume that the gases can expand into before the bullet starts moving. However in this case you only need to seat it a fraction of a mm deeper and it won't make much of a difference. If you're going by published load data it's going to err on the cautious side anyway.

I use published load data as a starting point, then use Gordon's Reloading Tool (http://grtools.de/) to sanity check it and see how much wiggle room I have. Heed the warnings the programs gives you and measure the volume of your fired cases and the actual measurements of your bullets, don't blindly trust the database. The more accurate your measurements, the more accurate the simulation will be. edit: Note that estimated velocity is going to be off for revolver rounds because the simulation assumes a sealed gas system and accounting for the cylinder gap is pretty much impossible.

As for crimping, if you're using a separate crimp die you won't have to change it if you change bullets. If you use a combined seater/crimper it depends on the design of the die, but probably not.

Collateral Damage fucked around with this message at 11:52 on May 4, 2021

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