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Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010





Fabbrica d'Armi Pietro Beretta was founded in 1526 by gunsmith Maestro Bartolomeo Beretta when the Asenal of Venice paid him 296 ducats for 185 arbuequs barrels. Since then, the company has remained a family-owned and managed business. These days, they are mostly known for their full-sized family of service pistols based on the 92FS, but they have a long history of rifle production, medium-frame pistols, pocket pistols, and crafting drat fine shotguns.

I'll get the ball rolling with a brief spurge about the Berettas that call my safe home.

96: Is just a 92 in 40 S&W. It has a reputation for quite likely being the softest shooting .40 service pistol ever made.



84BB: Do you like single action? Cocked and locked carry? Medium frames? Smaller calibers? Blued steel? double-stack mags? Then the 84BB will be right up your alley with 13 +1 rounds of .380 fury in a compact package with ambidextrous 1911-style safety.



My favorite, the model of 1934: Italy was very impressed with Walther's PP and PPK before the second of the World Wars and wanted something similar in 380 ACP. Beretta obliged with this thing.



Man has yet to find a classier way to dump a mag of .380 into an adversary's chest.

Beretta also made rifles for the fascists (and later the NAZIs after occupation of the plant) to the end of WWII: A quick example being my cavalry carbine.





I lack experience with their shotguns, a void in my gun safe I hope to fill someday. Someone else will have to talk about those.

F.A.Q:

Will the slide break and knock out my teeth if I shoot a 92FS? No. The hammer pin is enlarged into a groove in the slide should it snap in half. Besides, the slides don't break more often than other autos to be worth the concern. If you are still worried, get a Brigadier variant.

Brigadier? The area of the slide around the locking lugs is left a bit beefier than standard to help with longevity. This was made most famous by the Customs and Border Patrol with their 96D Brigadiers carried throughout my childhood. IR35, please send me yours



What the gently caress is a D spring? Beretta made a line of DAO 92s and 96s for a while and installed a lighter mainspring in them than they were in the FS series pistols. This lightened the trigger and smoothed it out noticeably.

Why would I want a skeletonized hammer on my 92/96? If you are anal-retentive enough to want a faster lock time, the hammers are pretty easy to install, some people also just think they look cool.

Where should I get spare mags for my 92/96/21? Either get factory or Mec-Gar. I have not really found any other mags worth screwing with.

Links:

Beretta USA - Beretta's U.S. site complete with white duty holsters as issued to the Carabinieri.

David Olhasso's Beretta Site - A good place to get parts(for the 92/96, Cougar, and PX4) and one of the few guys to regularly have locking block kits and D spring in stock. I've never had a problem ordering from him.

Beretta Forum - A good place to go for answers relating mostly to the 92/96, Bobcats/Tomcats, 84/85 series guns, and the Storm series of pistols and carbines. They like the older stuff, but have a shortage of good history nerds.

Beretta92FS.com - A series of free disassembly videos for the 92FS.

Mec-Gar - They make high-quality mags for the 92, 96, 84, 21 (both 22 LR and 25 ACP, and 950. Their 13 round 96 mags work great and are the exact size of the standard 11 round Beretta OEM mags, and their 18 round 92 mags are the same to the standard 15 round OEM mags.

By the way, Beretta also owns Benelli, Franchi, SAKO, Stoeger, Tikka, and Uberti so feel free to talk about any of those, as well.

I will try to fluff out this OP as I dig up some of my old links to build a link section, I get more material for the F.A.Q, some effort-posts roll in on later pages, and my computer stops crashing. Pocket pistols will get their own post as soon as I get my wife to take her 21a out of her pocket so I can take a few pictures.

Butch Cassidy fucked around with this message at 17:47 on Oct 11, 2011

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DJExile
Jun 27, 2007



That 84BB is cool as hell. I have a Beretta can I play too

Carbohydrates
Nov 22, 2006

Listen, Mr. Kansas Law Dog.
Law don't go around here.
Savvy?


92F, refinished OD, with D spring and some hammer polishing:


(click for effin' big)

I love my Beretta. I sold my other 9mms in favor of this one and I shoot it all the drat time. Compared to other double stack 9mm pistols in its class, it has a rather wide grip frame, which works great with my rather large hands.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



Has anyone ever wondered how to field-strip a Beretta 1934?

1. Safe the pistol after it is confirmed to be unloaded:



2. Pull the slide all the way back and the safety will click into the disassembly notch to hold it open:



3. Push on the muzzle until the barrel snaps back:



4. Lift the barrel out of the ejection port:



5. Remember that the safety can now just fall out of the frame and you are done:

Mad Dragon
Feb 29, 2004



Butch Cassidy posted:

These days, they are mostly known for their full-sized family of service pistols based on the 92FS, but they have a long history of rifle production, medium-frame pistols, pocket pistols, and crafting drat fine shotguns.
drat right.



1201FP - Beretta's less-expensive version of the Benelli M1S90. In fact, many parts made for the Benelli will fit on the 1201FP with little to no modifications. Mine has a large bolt handle, oversize safety and a Speedfeed IV-S pistol-grip stock.

I don't know what years had which options (), but it was available with 18" or 20" barrels, pistol-grip (not PGO) or traditional stocks, and adjustable rifle-style or ghost-ring sights. From what I've read, some magazines only hold five 2.75" shells. My version will hold six 2.75" shells in the tube, one in the chamber, and you can "ghost load" another shell between the closed bolt and the shell carrier.

I think the 1201FP would make an excellent entry-to-mid-level shotgun for 3-gun. The only real downside is its barrel/magazine assembly. The magazine doesn't have an open end, so it's pretty much impossible to expand its capacity. Maybe I should call the boys at Red Jacket to convert the tube bait and switch it into a Saiga.

edit:

Butch Cassidy posted:

Why would I want a skeletonized hammer on my 92/96? If you are anal-retentive enough to want a faster lock time, the hammers are pretty easy to install, some people also just think they look cool.

Definitely looks cool. This could be placebo effect, but the trigger feels "better" with the new hammer.



Mad Dragon fucked around with this message at 20:28 on Sep 5, 2011

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Beretta thread!

Old 8x series vs. new. 1970s production 81 on the left, 1990s production 85F on the right:





The 81 and the 82 are basically the equivalent of the 84 and the 85, however the 81 and 82 are .32 ACP instead of .380. The 81 is a double-stack like the 84, but despite it using a smaller round, it actually holds one less round in the magazine due to feeding issues caused by .32 ACP's semi-rimmed case design. The 82 is a single-stack like the 85.

Some cosmetic differences between the two: The biggest one to me is the recurved trigger guard on the newer models. The finish is also different, with the older guns being blued and the newer ones having the flat black Bruniton finish. There are also some subtler cues, such as the rear of the slide - the older guns are a little sleeker there. The older guns have an exposed notch in the slide for the slide stop, where the newer guns have a hidden notch. And the sights on the newer models are a little more substantial.

The biggest mechanical difference is that the safety on the older guns allows for cocked-and-locked carry, where the safety on the newer guns acts as a decocker, much like on the 92F. Another mechanical difference is that the newer guns have a magazine disconnect safety installed. This is pretty easily removed though - a much easier conversion than on a Browning Hi Power.

More to follow later.

infrared35 fucked around with this message at 03:31 on Sep 5, 2011

IuniusBrutus
Jul 24, 2010



infrared35 posted:

Beretta thread!

Old 8x series vs. new. 1970s production 81 on the left, 1990s production 85F on the right:





The 81 and the 82 are basically the equivalent of the 84 and the 85, however the 81 and 82 are .32 ACP instead of .380. The 81 is a double-stack like the 84, but despite it using a smaller round, it actually holds one less round in the magazine due to feeding issues caused by .32 ACP's semi-rimmed case design. The 82 is a single-stack like the 85.

Some cosmetic differences between the two: The biggest one to me is the recurved trigger guard on the newer models. The finish is also different, with the older guns being blued and the newer ones having the flat black Bruniton finish. There are also some subtler cues, such as the rear of the slide - the older guns are a little sleeker there. The older guns have an exposed notch in the slide for the slide stop, where the newer guns have a hidden notch. And the sights on the newer models are a little more substantial.

The biggest mechanical difference is that the safety on the older guns allows for cocked-and-locked carry, where the safety on the newer guns acts as a decocker, much like on the 92F. Another mechanical difference is that the newer guns have a magazine disconnect safety installed. This is pretty easily removed though - a much easier conversion than on a Browning Hi Power.

More to follow later.

Ugh, those look so awesome. I want that 85. And a 92. And a 92 brigadier. Sometimes I'm almost tempted to sell off my CZ85 and replace it with a Beretta...almost.

Eat This Glob
Jan 14, 2008

God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. Who will wipe this blood off us? What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we need to invent?

Lipstick Apathy

Butch, I don't think I've shot your 84BB. That's a classy looking little .380. Way better looking (and I'm assuming better shooting, with a fantastic capacity) than the LCP in my house. Also, your 96 is fantastic.

Berettas are fantastic, gently caress the haters.

Unskilled Labour
Jul 23, 2009


Beretta is very well known for their shotguns in Australia. Their trap guns are fantastic and used by close to a majority of Trap shooters here.

My 682 Gold E Double Trap, with adjustable stock.





Quantum Koala
Apr 21, 2010

Revvin' up your engine
Listen to her howlin' roar
Metal under tension
Beggin' you to touch and go


Unskilled Labour posted:

Beretta is very well known for their shotguns in Australia.

I always saw Beretta as a shotgun manufacturer that happened to also make a few pistols.

Unskilled Labour
Jul 23, 2009


Quantum Koala posted:

I always saw Beretta as a shotgun manufacturer that happened to also make a few pistols.

I think that's a good description of how they're seen here actually.

GEEKABALL
May 30, 2011

Throw out your hands!!
Stick out your tush!!
Hands on your hips
Give them a push!!


Fun Shoe

Unskilled Labour posted:


That is a beautiful gun. I meant to congratulate you on your purchase in your box thread, never got around to it.
Mine is not nearly as nice, and quite a bit older:

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



Unskilled Labour posted:

My 682 Gold E Double Trap, with adjustable stock.



I am firmly in the double-trigger camp, but between the Beretta a certain Brit uses to bring home many tasty game birds and your clay buster, I am getting closer to saying screw it and just buying a Beretta single trigger and all.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Berettas on parade!

On and off over the years I have owned a full-sized Beretta of some kind pretty much continuously. The exact model depended mostly on my whims/budget and what was available at the time. I don't have photos of anything before, say, 2000 or so which is unfortunate because in the early to mid-nineties I had a 92C (13-shot compact) and a 92C Type M (8-shot single stack compact).

More recently I've been a bit more budget-minded so the Berettas I've picked up have mostly been police trade-ins. The first of my "recent" crop of Italian Tomahawks was a trade-in 92F Vertec:





The Vertec is a redesigned F (or G, or D) model with a thinner grip, a flat backstrap, a slightly shorter trigger pull, and an accessory rail. Beretta was aiming for the tactical market and they had some success but just couldn't compete with Glock at that point. If you want tactical but prefer the classic looks of the 92F and yet still want to easily mount a light or laser, there's always the M9A1. If you like the 92F but wish it was a little more spacey, check out the 90-Two.



At any rate, I then picked up a 92FS police trade-in; it was one of the CDNN specials in "poor to fair" condition but it was only $289. I jumped on it. It had a fair amount of holster wear but was mechanically good, and its accuracy was superb. It's one of my happiest purchases ever.





15-round magazine, 15 yards, slow fire:





Chillin' with its Vertec cousin:





CDNN began offering 96G "uppers" for $150 - it was a .40 slide and barrel with night sights, available in either full length or Centurion length (about an inch shorter). And being a G, it was a decocker only instead of a decocker/safety like on a regular F model. I picked one up and ran it on the Vertec for a while. It was flawless and made me realize that a Beretta was one of the few .40 platforms that was actually pleasant to shoot.





All the while, I knew there was a niche to fill in my collection. I really wanted a 96D just like the one I had shot at work. That meant that I couldn't just order any of the $300 96Ds that were flooding the market. No, that would be too easy. I had to have a 96D Brigadier - the one with the heavy duty slide. Then and only then would I be happy. I didn't hold out much hope. They were extremely rare, the vast majority being produced for federal law enforcement contracts and only a handful making it to the open market. I would occasionally see one on gunbroker but the seller was invariably asking $800 or more. But one day, on a whim, I stopped by the Gander Mountain in Marquette, Michigan and checked out their used guns. Sitting right there in a place of honor was a 96D Brigadier, all original, with night sights, three mags, case, manual, and cleaning kit for $499.

I had to have it, but money was tight. I knew that this was a much rarer gun than the two Berettas I already owned and that those two would be easy to replace, so I put the Vertec on the market and it went to a loving goon home. Right about that same time, my father-in-law was expressing an interest in getting a range/home defense gun but he was on a tight budget. I didn't want him to go out and pick up a Hi-Point or something, so I sold him my 92FS with the understanding that I still have visitation rights.







Bucket o' Berettas at work, when the field offices were turning them in to be melted down:





For some reason I just really like smooth double action triggers. There's something about them that really forces me to focus on the front sight, or something. With the Beretta I shot a perfect score on my agency's bullseye course - a 300 out of 300 - when previously the best I had been able to accomplish was 293. I was happy. Content. My Beretta life was full.

And then G43 posted a Beretta 85 for sale in the classifieds thread. He knew I had a soft spot in my heart for the Italian guns, so after protracted negotiations in the language of love (German), I purchased a .380. My wife has had a Beretta 84 for years and while I do like it, I feel that the 13-shot double stack is a little fat to be a handy carry gun. The 85 is a single stack and is considerably slimmer.

85, 84, and 96D:





Once again I was happy. There was a niche to be filled and I hadn't even known it. Having that little .380 made my collection feel complete.

And then my local tactishop had a going out of business sale, and one of the last handguns he had left was a PX4 Storm in 9mm with the Constant Action trigger, which is similar to SIG's DAK system. I thought the PX4s were ugly so I never looked at or handled one before, but on a whim I asked to check this one out. I picked it up and fell in love with it. It is fairly slim for a double stack, it was reasonably light with a good balance, the sights were awesome, and the frame had a nice, grippy texture. The gun pointed very naturally for me and I was immediately drawn to the smooth DAO pull of the CA trigger. He was basically selling it at dealer cost and he threw in a holster, so I said yes.









NOW my collection was complete. I had a 96D, an 85F, and a PX4.

And then Gray Stormy expressed some general dissatisfaction with the 92D that he had. I wanted him to be happy, and I wanted the gun to be happy as well, so I traded him the S&W M&P9 that I rarely used for his DAO eye-talian.







I had given another D gun a good home, and it was a little cheaper to shoot than my Brigadier, plus I wouldn't have to feel bad about putting a lot of wear and tear on the .40 since it's arguably got some collector's value. I was content.

But I had one last itch that had been sitting on the back burner and other mixed metaphors. I wanted one of the 8x-series guns, but in .32 ACP. It just seemed like it would be a heck of a lot of fun. The 81 was my choice, partly because it was probably the only "high capacity" conventional .32 handgun ever made. They were almost impossible to find, however. They had been out of production for a long time and didn't have much of a following partly due to the caliber. But over the last year, the market was suddenly flooded with them. Apparently the Israeli government had a huge stockpile of the things and they were selling them all off. My local fudd shop had one for $289 and it was impossible to say no.





NOW I'm content.



On a side note, they're a little slow to the market but Beretta finally came out with a pocket 9mm - the BU9 "Nano." It's basically a single-stack PX4 subcompact... with a very Glockish-looking trigger.

infrared35 fucked around with this message at 17:41 on Sep 5, 2011

miklm
Dec 7, 2003

What a cunning fellow.

Quantum Koala posted:

I always saw Beretta as a shotgun manufacturer that happened to also make a few pistols.

As did I.

I'm looking at a Px4 Compact (not Sub-compact, but the middle version). Opinions? I've held XD, XDm, M&P, FNP-9, and various Glocks but like the feel of the Px4 best.

DJExile
Jun 27, 2007



Who's got that OD green 92 because that thing loving owned

E: Wow I looked right past Carbo's post. I'm dumb!

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



Beretta story:

I grew up in a law-enforcement family through the '90s. That's right, the beginning of the tacticlol phase, TAPCO as far as the eye could see. My mother's department was content with its 3rd Generation 45 caliber Smith autos and 870s (hell, they even stuck with PR-24s until the new millenium), my father's...

Tactical SKS as a patrol rifle, "hey let's ditch these GP-100s for some G17s", "Hey let's ditch these G17s for the stoppin' powah of the G22", 590s with ghost rings as shotguns, the whole works. I got to play with them all, falling in love with 40 S&W along the way. gently caress the haters, 40 is a hoot.

Anyway, my father burned out of general police work in a hard way and gave his department his two weeks notice. A town up north offered him an SRO position and he jumped at the chance to never again need to wrestle a drunk out of a car, in the snow, on a busy highway. I no longer got to shoot with him much after that. His new chief had some anal-retentive policies regarding duty weapons and the department range was not to be used for personal fun. Officers were given practice ammo by the town to use on their own time, but my father seemed dis-interested in taking his new service pistol to the range and I never got to shoot it. He didn't care for DA/SA, watching a hammer drop free to de-cock annoyed him, and 9x19mm was not his cup of tea.

When his department decided to go to the G21 as an issue weapon due to fears of 9mm over-penetration , he happily handed over his 92FS to at least carry a GLOCK once more. Never a fan of .45, he liked the pistol itself better and never complained.

Fast-forward to my 21st birthday. I picked up my new license at the DMV and went to my favorite death merchant to buy some ammo. As I looked in his pistol case, I noticed a gently caress-ton of Berettas and asked to handle one just because I had never really been able to see how my father's felt. It felt amazing, just loving perfect in my hand, the sights came up dead-on-target, and I started to hand it back. A little spot of white caught my eye and I noticed a caliber designation on the barrel; I was holding a forty. I had no money, so I had to hand it back over. "See you by the weekend!" Said the clerk.

"Meh, I'm busy and can't afford anything much right now, so no."

I told my wife about the Beretta and how it was just right for me when I got home. As I whined about not having the money to buy it, she huffed at me and stormed out of the room. As I tried to think of what I said to annoy her, she came back into the room and threw a box at my head. A box full of money that she had been saving all year to buy me a handgun for my birthday. I was told that she planned to take me to a gun store to find out what I liked and buy it.

As I walked into the store the next day, the owner smiled a devious grin and placed the 96 on the counter. "I knew you would be back."

It was a while before I got a chance to go shooting with my father again, and I brought my no-beloved Beretta with us. After seeing how small a group he could make with my K 31, he began to mutter about all the things he hated about his old 92. As a matter of loyalty to 40 S&W, though, he asked to run a mag through the 96. I saw a crooked grin cross his face and I am pretty sure he even giggled. Every last round of compliment my wife for her taste in presents. To this day, he loves my 96 and shoots it whenever we go to the range. I guess a little time and a favorite caliber were all it took to change his mind.

I stopped carrying the 96 after it had been on my hip every day for a year when I grew tired of the holes its safety wore in my shirts. A G23 follows me around now and reminds me of my father, but if I finally break and pick up a 96D, I might go back to an Italian brick and tell my G23 to go gently caress itself.

infrared35 posted:

...The 81 was my choice, partly because it was probably the only "high capacity" conventional .32 handgun ever made... My local fudd shop had one for $289 and it was impossible to say no...

gently caress you, gently caress you, gently caress you. I have yet to see one around here in anywhere near that condition for less than $400. gently caress you.

Butch Cassidy fucked around with this message at 17:59 on Sep 5, 2011

Gray Stormy
Dec 19, 2006



IR35 is the Beretta King. Long live the king!

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Gray Stormy posted:

IR35 is the Beretta King. Long live the king!

I have stood upon the shoulders of giants.



Butch Cassidy posted:

gently caress you, gently caress you, gently caress you. I have yet to see one around here in anywhere near that condition for less than $400. gently caress you.

Get one shipped. You can have one in decent condition for less than $400 if you look around gunbroker. And if you really don't care about cosmetic condition, they range all the way down to $199.

The same seller has a ton of them in varying conditions.

Edit: I love the wear on this Beretta 82 but it doesn't come with a mag. Of course, the 81 I linked above doesn't come with a mag either. Though at least you can still get mags for the 81 right from Beretta.

infrared35 fucked around with this message at 18:21 on Sep 5, 2011

SixthFloorFreak
Jun 18, 2005


I'm so going to buy the poo poo out of a 92a1 this week...you guys are hell on my wallet

Neo Mara
Apr 20, 2005



BERETTA PARTY THREAD


need to take a good pic of my 686

Propagandalf
Dec 6, 2008

itchy itchy itchy itchy

Your Beretta has a choke?

McNally
Sep 12, 2007

Ask me about Proposition 305


Do you like muskets?


I used to have a very shiny Beretta.

hangedman
Dec 20, 2003

Fish out of water

One of my holdouts is a Beretta Series 70. I think the 84 / 85 is a damned near-ideal platform for the .380 round, and the DA trigger on either model is simply fantastic.

I was at a gun show about a year and a half ago where I'd actually found a series-70 Beretta in .32 for about $300. I had the cash onhand, but because of our stupid state, the seller hadn't collected all of the necessary information from the guy who put the gun on consignment and couldn't sell it at the show, which meant that I'd have to make TWO 80-minute drives if I wanted the gun. Once to get out to the rear end-end of Riverside county (note: there is nothing good at all in this county) to do all of the paperwork, and once more to take possession 10 days later.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Part of my love for Beretta has to do with their style, and another part is for how smooth their actions are. A third factor is their customer service.

My wife got a really good deal on a used Beretta 84F and while it looked like it was in decent shape, the slide stop notch was so worn out that the gun wouldn't lock open at all. She sent it back to Beretta for a repair estimate, and they shipped it back about a week later and it looked like they had completely cleaned and refurbed the entire gun. It looked brand new. Not only that, but they included a new box, hard case, cleaning kit, and magazine loading tool.

I took a Beretta armorer's course and admired the mechanical design; then I took an armorer's course specifically for the 96D, and the simplicity of the gun impressed me. It wasn't Glock-simple, but it was still an elegant design with very little to go wrong. I also like the fact that they designed the gun so you could run a mainspring with half the weight of the "normal" spring and still have 100% reliability but get an 8-pound DA trigger instead of a 16-pounder.

Carbohydrates
Nov 22, 2006

Listen, Mr. Kansas Law Dog.
Law don't go around here.
Savvy?


DJExile posted:

Who's got that OD green 92 because that thing loving owned

E: Wow I looked right past Carbo's post. I'm dumb!
You know how we do.




edit:

Carbohydrates fucked around with this message at 21:49 on Sep 5, 2011

GEEKABALL
May 30, 2011

Throw out your hands!!
Stick out your tush!!
Hands on your hips
Give them a push!!


Fun Shoe

The Goons in the .22LR thread liked this pic:

It's a Beretta 102 (and my Mark III). The Beretta belongs to my father, but he lets me borrow it if I ask nicely. I'm thinking about buying a 92 and asking him if he will trade with me.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

That 102 is sweet as hell.

Kommienzuspadt
Apr 28, 2004

U like it


Beretta DAOs interest me greatly.

DJExile
Jun 27, 2007



I usually can't stand DAO triggers but goddamn Beretta makes them nice. The old S&W autoloaders had good DA triggers too.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Kommienzuspadt posted:

Beretta DAOs interest me greatly.

They are a thing of beauty. The trigger pull is long, but it's not too heavy and it's very smooth.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



DAO you say?



Let's add single-stack to the mix with the Beretta 92D Type M. 8+1 rounds of 9mm in a compact package with a silky-smooth trigger. Someday, I will have money in my pocket when I run across one. So far, I have only been able to drool and dry fire a few times.

DJExile
Jun 27, 2007



Butch Cassidy posted:

DAO you say?



Let's add single-stack to the mix with the Beretta 92D Type M. 8+1 rounds of 9mm in a compact package with a silky-smooth trigger. Someday, I will have money in my pocket when I run across one. So far, I have only been able to drool and dry fire a few times.

I'll be damned, I have never seen a single stack 9mm Beretta. Are they very common?

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Butch Cassidy posted:

DAO you say?



Let's add single-stack to the mix with the Beretta 92D Type M. 8+1 rounds of 9mm in a compact package with a silky-smooth trigger. Someday, I will have money in my pocket when I run across one. So far, I have only been able to drool and dry fire a few times.

drat, that's awesome. Okay, I guess there's still a hole in my collection. I always regretted selling my regular Type M. A D-series would seriously kick rear end.



DJExile posted:

I'll be damned, I have never seen a single stack 9mm Beretta. Are they very common?

There's a reason you don't see them very often. There are very few around.

lite_sleepr
Jun 3, 2003




Infrared, I remember selling you a P2000 holster for work and I never found out where you work. What do you do to wear ugly as balls standard issue combat boots and handle a bucket o' Berettas?

DJExile
Jun 27, 2007



Packard Goose posted:

Infrared, I remember selling you a P2000 holster for work and I never found out where you work. What do you do to wear ugly as balls standard issue combat boots and handle a bucket o' Berettas?

He work for da guv'ment

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Packard Goose posted:

Infrared, I remember selling you a P2000 holster for work and I never found out where you work. What do you do to wear ugly as balls standard issue combat boots and handle a bucket o' Berettas?

I work at or perhaps near the border or the functional equivalent thereof. Oh, and I wear swanky Converse side-zip boots now. They're like moon boots.

Have a photo of a bucket of P2000s.





drat, guess I'm gonna have to win the lottery if I want a D-series Type M.

Edit: I'd kind of like to own a Beretta Cougar as well, maybe an 8045D.

Edit 2: I guess I could probably fake a D Type M by buying a regular Type M, swapping the D-series fire control group into it, and throwing on a D-series Centurion upper. Maybe. At the very least I could do up one of the 13-shot compacts that way.

infrared35 fucked around with this message at 01:03 on Sep 6, 2011

lite_sleepr
Jun 3, 2003




What department of the gub'ment? The gun department? I'm looking to get the gently caress out of the US Military, and a job would be cool.

EDIT: Duuur you're customs and border protection?

Gray Stormy
Dec 19, 2006



Those look an awful lot like my Steyr magazines. I wonder if they would work as a cheaper alternative to Steyr mags?

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lite_sleepr
Jun 3, 2003




Gray Stormy posted:

Those look an awful lot like my Steyr magazines. I wonder if they would work as a cheaper alternative to Steyr mags?

The HK Mags? I'm positive any magazine is less than an HK mag, even one made of solid gold

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