Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«1046 »
  • Post
  • Reply
teacup
Dec 20, 2006


I got a Himalayan salt block for cooking on for Christmas and I’m gonna crack it out tomorrow. Hopefully scallops and prawns. Im keen to try steaks and a few other recipes like a nice tuna steak on it too. Any hints / tips for it? Good recipes? I got a little cookbook with it but any goon re commendations ?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Paperhouse
Dec 31, 2008

I think
your hair
looks much
better
pushed
over to
one side


Squashy Nipples posted:

Am I the only one who thinks marshmallows on top of any kind of casserole is disgusting?

I've never had it since it seems to be a uniquely American thing, but it sounds absolutely insane to me

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Marshmallows on sweet potato casserole are heinous.

There Bias Two
Jan 13, 2009



teacup posted:

I got a Himalayan salt block for cooking on for Christmas and I’m gonna crack it out tomorrow. Hopefully scallops and prawns. Im keen to try steaks and a few other recipes like a nice tuna steak on it too. Any hints / tips for it? Good recipes? I got a little cookbook with it but any goon re commendations ?

It's a dumb gimmick and takes way too long to heat/cool to be useful. Anything fatty will likely splatter everywhere as well, so keep that in mind.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Lawnie posted:

Marshmallows on sweet potato casserole are heinous.

ur heinous

Mikey Purp
Sep 30, 2008

I realized it's gotten out of control. I realize I'm out of control.

RE: Himalayan salt block, I'm not as down on them as the poster above, but you do need to be thoughtful with how you use it. In particular, they've got to preheat on a grill or in an oven for at least an hour before they'll do a good job searing anything. Also, don't think that you can just not salt something if you're going to cook it on the block. I recommend using it on a grill if you can.

Fwiw, I used mine to sear about 2-3 times, and now I mostly use it as a serving platter for steaks or seafood. It's great for that purpose.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

You wildly underestimated my liver's ability to metabolize toxins.

Paperhouse posted:

I've never had it since it seems to be a uniquely American thing, but it sounds absolutely insane to me

It's a dessert. It's basically just a charred sugar layer on top of sweet potato pie filling. It's good.

There Bias Two
Jan 13, 2009



Grand Fromage posted:

It's a dessert. It's basically just a charred sugar layer on top of sweet potato pie filling. It's good.

People usually eat it as a side dish rather than a dessert in my experience.

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



It's a dessert side dish, really. It's a perfect complement to cranberry sauce, like stuffing is to green bean casserole. Save it for after you finish everything else, otherwise you'll get weird sweet-savory crossover.

moller
Jan 10, 2007

Swan stole my music and framed me!


Steve Yun posted:

I like my sweet potato casserole in every form. Brown sugar or no brown sugar, marshmallows or no marshmallows, pecans or no pecans, chunky or smooth. They're all good!



Also, agreeing below with the person who says to use cheap mini marshmallows.

JacquelineDempsey
Aug 6, 2008

It's a horrible name for anything really but especially a shirt.


I work for a small local restaurant that specializes in biscuits. We also partner with a local bakery for our Sunday brunch specials, where they supply delicious peasant, wheat, rye, etc breads.

I take home a lot of leftover/stale baked stuff. When I first got the job in October, I started taking home gallon ziplocs full of biscuits that would otherwise be tossed, put in them my freezer, and made a bitchin' Thanksgiving stuffing.

Now we're doing more with the bakery so I'm coming home with bags full of the loaf heels we can't use for sandwiches. I've got like 5 gallon bags hanging around from this weekend alone.

Besides making croutons to last me until the end of time, what are some other uses for a fuckton of about-to-go-stale bread and biscuits?

Edit to clarify for the UK crowd: I'm in the US, so by biscuit I mean the big flaky rolls, not what we call cookies and you call biscuits.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

JacquelineDempsey posted:

I work for a small local restaurant that specializes in biscuits. We also partner with a local bakery for our Sunday brunch specials, where they supply delicious peasant, wheat, rye, etc breads.

I take home a lot of leftover/stale baked stuff. When I first got the job in October, I started taking home gallon ziplocs full of biscuits that would otherwise be tossed, put in them my freezer, and made a bitchin' Thanksgiving stuffing.

Now we're doing more with the bakery so I'm coming home with bags full of the loaf heels we can't use for sandwiches. I've got like 5 gallon bags hanging around from this weekend alone.

Besides making croutons to last me until the end of time, what are some other uses for a fuckton of about-to-go-stale bread and biscuits?

Bread pudding for one.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

JacquelineDempsey posted:

I work for a small local restaurant that specializes in biscuits. We also partner with a local bakery for our Sunday brunch specials, where they supply delicious peasant, wheat, rye, etc breads.

I take home a lot of leftover/stale baked stuff. When I first got the job in October, I started taking home gallon ziplocs full of biscuits that would otherwise be tossed, put in them my freezer, and made a bitchin' Thanksgiving stuffing.

Now we're doing more with the bakery so I'm coming home with bags full of the loaf heels we can't use for sandwiches. I've got like 5 gallon bags hanging around from this weekend alone.

Besides making croutons to last me until the end of time, what are some other uses for a fuckton of about-to-go-stale bread and biscuits?

Edit to clarify for the UK crowd: I'm in the US, so by biscuit I mean the big flaky rolls, not what we call cookies and you call biscuits.

the bread would be good for this:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...ing-recipe.html

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


All french toast, all the time.

Jeb! Repetition
Dec 24, 2012

Ask me about Briar Rose and Chicken Chaser.


BrianBoitano posted:

Are you using mini marshmallows or large? Big box brand or ~bespoke 2 ingredient~?

Big box brand mini marshmallows are your best bet. Mini have more cornstarch coating per unit volume and big box brand has more stabilizers, so if anything will stay whole it's those ones.

I'm using Jet-Puffed mini marshmallows.

There Bias Two posted:

People usually eat it as a side dish rather than a dessert in my experience.

It's kind of halfway between dessert and side dish, like jello or a shake.

Power of Pecota
Aug 3, 2007

It is not that bad, there is hope, there is charity, there is compassion blah blah blah Charles Dickens three ghosts visit Scrooge and he wakes up to life blah blah blah


I tried my first quick pickle yesterday (about a pound of daikon with this recipe) and it came out super tasty!

Unfortunately it has an earthy fart smell that I'm now trying to air out of my apartment. From other recipes I'm checking now it looks like the use of lukewarm water for the second step instead of boiling it is the culprit. Is that the case, or did I possibly gently caress something else up?

(Also, any tips for getting rid of fermenting radish smell would be appreciated)

Imbroglio
Mar 8, 2013


JacquelineDempsey posted:

Besides making croutons to last me until the end of time, what are some other uses for a fuckton of about-to-go-stale bread and biscuits?
You could try making Kvass with the rye.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

You wildly underestimated my liver's ability to metabolize toxins.

Pappa al pomodoro is awesome and uses lots of bread.

Also if you're going to use the bread for soups and stuff in the future there's no harm in freezing it, the texture change won't matter.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Grand Fromage posted:

Pappa al pomodoro is awesome and uses lots of bread.

Also if you're going to use the bread for soups and stuff in the future there's no harm in freezing it, the texture change won't matter.

Yup, same for bread pudding. I keep a little freezer bag going of random stale ends and when that gets full to a point it's time for dessert.

Pookah
Aug 21, 2008

Caw



If you're going to have a roast turkey or roast chicken dinner, maybe try making bread sauce?

https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes...nal-bread-sauce

I know it sounds disgusting, but it's actually really nice*! Even if you hate it you'll only have wasted some milk, an onion and a few other bits n pieces - like, the cream is a nice extra but totally not necessary.

(* At least, I think it's nice and everyone I know who's eaten it thinks it's nice but it might be one of those thing you had to grow up eating)

Squashy Nipples
Aug 18, 2007



Power of Pecota posted:

I tried my first quick pickle yesterday (about a pound of daikon with this recipe) and it came out super tasty!

Unfortunately it has an earthy fart smell that I'm now trying to air out of my apartment. From other recipes I'm checking now it looks like the use of lukewarm water for the second step instead of boiling it is the culprit. Is that the case, or did I possibly gently caress something else up?

(Also, any tips for getting rid of fermenting radish smell would be appreciated)

I love love love daikon, but it smells like stale farts, and there isn't much you can do about it. I love it raw, too, but that gives me horrible farts.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


Power of Pecota posted:

I tried my first quick pickle yesterday (about a pound of daikon with this recipe) and it came out super tasty!

Unfortunately it has an earthy fart smell that I'm now trying to air out of my apartment. From other recipes I'm checking now it looks like the use of lukewarm water for the second step instead of boiling it is the culprit. Is that the case, or did I possibly gently caress something else up?

(Also, any tips for getting rid of fermenting radish smell would be appreciated)

Yeah pickling and fermenting daikon smells like broccoli farts.

If you like the flavor and texture, try to find a Korean radish cuz it's similar to daikon but less stinky when fermenting.

Jeb! Repetition
Dec 24, 2012

Ask me about Briar Rose and Chicken Chaser.


Could I add potatoes to this recipe? http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...-recipe-2118771

Edit: Wait I should probably just have mashed potatoes on the side

Jeb! Repetition fucked around with this message at Jan 22, 2018 around 20:15

goodness
Jan 3, 2012

When the light turns green, you go. When the light turns red, you stop. But what do you do when the light turns blue with orange and lavender spots?


What to do with 20 leftover Jalapenos?

Pickle some, and hot sauce some?

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

Jeb! Repetition posted:

Could I add potatoes to this recipe? http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...-recipe-2118771

Edit: Wait I should probably just have mashed potatoes on the side
You can do many, many things with potatoes. In this case, you could throw the spuds in with the roast and have them soak up those juices. Or roast the potatoes separately at the same time as the roast. Or do some other potato-in-oven thing, since the oven is there and all warmed up and everything.

I like potatoes. Even mashed, though in this case it does seem like a missed opportunity.

Jeb! Repetition
Dec 24, 2012

Ask me about Briar Rose and Chicken Chaser.


ExecuDork posted:

You can do many, many things with potatoes. In this case, you could throw the spuds in with the roast and have them soak up those juices. Or roast the potatoes separately at the same time as the roast. Or do some other potato-in-oven thing, since the oven is there and all warmed up and everything.

I like potatoes. Even mashed, though in this case it does seem like a missed opportunity.

Yeah, that broth is crying out to be used in gravy.

Jeb! Repetition
Dec 24, 2012

Ask me about Briar Rose and Chicken Chaser.


Speaking of gravy, would it work to just put starch in that broth before it cooked instead of pouring the broth off onto roux after it's done?

JacquelineDempsey
Aug 6, 2008

It's a horrible name for anything really but especially a shirt.


Thanks for the bread suggestions, y'all!

Suspect Bucket posted:

All french toast, all the time.

Totally would, but I'm working with tough, crusty heels here, not nice slices. But, to return the favor, here's a suggestion for folks looking for something to do with stale slices: we did a savory french toast for brunch a couple weeks ago. Same basic principle of bread slices dipped in beaten eggs & cream, but instead of the usual cinnamon/vanilla/sugar flavors you'd expect in french toast, we did thyme, rosemary, and some of our sausage seasoning.

I was skeptical when the boss announced it, and my brain back-fired on the first bite just because I'm so used to french toast being sweet, but hell if that wasn't some good poo poo. We served it with egg and cheese on top, but I bet a savory french toast made with rye would make a hella pastrami sandwich.

Jeb! Repetition posted:

Speaking of gravy, would it work to just put starch in that broth before it cooked instead of pouring the broth off onto roux after it's done?

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the whole point of roux-then-broth is because the butter fat in a roux "unlocks" the starch and allows it to nicely blend with your liquid. Just putting starch into broth makes for lumpy, broken gravy.

EDIT

goodness posted:

What to do with 20 leftover Jalapenos?

Pickle some, and hot sauce some?

How big are they? If you got a mind to stuff them, for either frying or pickling, my boss taught me the easiest way to de-seed them while keeping them whole. I did 10 lbs and didn't split one. I'm happy to share with the class if y'all wanna know.

My suggestion: shred some carrot/radish/daikon, mix with some minced garlic, stuff em. Pickle em.

gently caress, now I wish I had 20 jalapenos lying around to try this idea out.

JacquelineDempsey fucked around with this message at Jan 22, 2018 around 22:38

goodness
Jan 3, 2012

When the light turns green, you go. When the light turns red, you stop. But what do you do when the light turns blue with orange and lavender spots?


JacquelineDempsey posted:

How big are they? If you got a mind to stuff them, for either frying or pickling, my boss taught me the easiest way to de-seed them while keeping them whole. I did 10 lbs and didn't split one. I'm happy to share with the class if y'all wanna know.

My suggestion: shred some carrot/radish/daikon, mix with some minced garlic, stuff em. Pickle em.

gently caress, now I wish I had 20 jalapenos lying around to try this idea out.

They are pretty big ones, I'd love to know

Jeb! Repetition
Dec 24, 2012

Ask me about Briar Rose and Chicken Chaser.


JacquelineDempsey posted:

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the whole point of roux-then-broth is because the butter fat in a roux "unlocks" the starch and allows it to nicely blend with your liquid. Just putting starch into broth makes for lumpy, broken gravy.

Hm. What about making the broth into a gravy with roux and everything before I cook, then? Would there be danger of the roast not getting moist enough cooking in gravy instead of broth?

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Jeb! Repetition posted:

Hm. What about making the broth into a gravy with roux and everything before I cook, then? Would there be danger of the roast not getting moist enough cooking in gravy instead of broth?

That would probably be fine. Roux can accomplish a few things though, depends on what you are after. If you just want the roux as a thickening agent, then you could also use: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_mani%C3%A9

If you want some of the more nutty flavors and not just a light flour flavor then darkening the roux before adding the stock (to quench the toasting of the flour in the fat) will give you that. It will affect color and flavor and will also as the roux darkens, cause it to thicken an equal volume of stock to a lesser and lesser extent.

I've made soups with a roux base and added in a little buerre manie at the end if it needed to be just a bit thicker. So, really just go nuts with whatever you think will work best. I'd only caution against going for a very thick gravy with buerre manie alone as it will taste overwhelmingly of flour.

moller
Jan 10, 2007

Swan stole my music and framed me!


Jeb! Repetition posted:

Hm. What about making the broth into a gravy with roux and everything before I cook, then? Would there be danger of the roast not getting moist enough cooking in gravy instead of broth?

I sort of assume it would break or reduce too much or scorch or something else terrible. For all its merits, gravy tends to be a JIT preparation.

Edit: If I understand correctly, making a roux is essentially deep-frying each individual grain of flour in hot oil, hence all the stirring. Otherwise you end up with something more like dumplings.

moller fucked around with this message at Jan 23, 2018 around 00:38

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

moller posted:

I sort of assume it would break or reduce too much or scorch or something else terrible. For all its merits, gravy tends to be a JIT preparation.

Edit: If I understand correctly, making a roux is essentially deep-frying each individual grain of flour in hot oil, hence all the stirring. Otherwise you end up with something more like dumplings.

The stirring is to keep the flour from burning instead of just toasting (in my experience). Once the roux and stock are combined (like in a gumbo) you can simmer that for a long time. In an exceptionally thick roux gravy it might 'break' somewhat but honestly you can fix that by just bringing it back up to a quick boil and whisking it together a bit. It's not bad like a broken hollandaise.

Jeb! Repetition
Dec 24, 2012

Ask me about Briar Rose and Chicken Chaser.


That Works posted:

That would probably be fine. Roux can accomplish a few things though, depends on what you are after. If you just want the roux as a thickening agent, then you could also use: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_mani%C3%A9

If you want some of the more nutty flavors and not just a light flour flavor then darkening the roux before adding the stock (to quench the toasting of the flour in the fat) will give you that. It will affect color and flavor and will also as the roux darkens, cause it to thicken an equal volume of stock to a lesser and lesser extent.

I've made soups with a roux base and added in a little buerre manie at the end if it needed to be just a bit thicker. So, really just go nuts with whatever you think will work best. I'd only caution against going for a very thick gravy with buerre manie alone as it will taste overwhelmingly of flour.

Yeah losing the roasted flavor of a darker roux was my original fear about just tossing in flour, because it complements beef juice so well.

moller posted:

I sort of assume it would break or reduce too much or scorch or something else terrible. For all its merits, gravy tends to be a JIT preparation.

Edit: If I understand correctly, making a roux is essentially deep-frying each individual grain of flour in hot oil, hence all the stirring. Otherwise you end up with something more like dumplings.

Well since normally the broth in a pot roast increases I'm not overly worried about reduction. But poo poo, it'd definitely break, wouldn't it? Maybe I should gravy it at the end after all.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Jeb! Repetition posted:

Yeah losing the roasted flavor of a darker roux was my original fear about just tossing in flour, because it complements beef juice so well.


Well since normally the broth in a pot roast increases I'm not overly worried about reduction. But poo poo, it'd definitely break, wouldn't it? Maybe I should gravy it at the end after all.

Sounds like yoursafest bet is to make the roast, then when it's done drain out the juices and add that to a freshly made roux then recombine and simmer a bit.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


You could thicken with potato flour or cornstarch or arrowroot slurry or a beurre manie during the final part of the cooking time instead of having to pour off and make a traditional gravy.

The only reason you'd add a roux up front is for flavor. The long cook time will negate most of the thickening effect. See: dark roux and gumbo. A lot of flavor, not much thickening power. OTOH, you could just add more savory things up front like mushrooms or tomato paste or fish sauce or a couple anchovy or something to compensate when thickening at the end.

I suggest always decanting any sort of braising or roasting liquid so you can separate the fat from the drippings or stock. Keeping all the fat that rendered off in the gravy leads to a kinda gross texture IMO.

moller
Jan 10, 2007

Swan stole my music and framed me!


Casu Marzu posted:

I suggest always decanting any sort of braising or roasting liquid so you can separate the fat from the drippings or stock. Keeping all the fat that rendered off in the gravy leads to a kinda gross texture IMO.

You can also use the separated fat to make the roux, which is SOP for cream gravies I think.

Jeb! Repetition
Dec 24, 2012

Ask me about Briar Rose and Chicken Chaser.


Yeah I was gonna skim the beef fat off with a baster for the roux.

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

JakeP Heroes of the Storm Fan Club President
"When I grow up, I want to be just like JakeP from the Something Awful Heroes of the Storm Thread!"
-BrianBoitano

goodness posted:

What to do with 20 leftover Jalapenos?

Pickle some, and hot sauce some?

Overall in your position I'd probably agree to do pickled (fermented not vinegar), then hot sauce (I've got a nice Bon Appetit one), but if you already have those on hand I'd jelly.

Jalapeño jelly is stupid simple, quick, and the quality is on a different plane from store bought. Eat it simply on a pork / lamb chop or alongside crackers and cream cheese. Replace some of the sweet component of margaritas (traditionally triplesec but commonly sour mix or agave nectar).

I've got mom's recipe in a binder if you want me to get it after work today.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

goodness
Jan 3, 2012

When the light turns green, you go. When the light turns red, you stop. But what do you do when the light turns blue with orange and lavender spots?


BrianBoitano posted:

Overall in your position I'd probably agree to do pickled (fermented not vinegar), then hot sauce (I've got a nice Bon Appetit one), but if you already have those on hand I'd jelly.

Jalapeño jelly is stupid simple, quick, and the quality is on a different plane from store bought. Eat it simply on a pork / lamb chop or alongside crackers and cream cheese. Replace some of the sweet component of margaritas (traditionally triplesec but commonly sour mix or agave nectar).

I've got mom's recipe in a binder if you want me to get it after work today.

I would appreciate that recipe, thanks.

I’ve only pickled not fermented so I will have to try that as well

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«1046 »