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Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



HClChicken posted:

I have one of those hams you buy at the grocery store and you cook. I've never cooked one before and all I've had before consists of brown sugar, butter, and sometimes a fruit like pineapple. What is something else I could try to do?

It's not been cut at all.

Cut up, simmer with a lot of cabbage or sauerkraut and a bottle of beer. Serve with good spicy mustard and some hard rolls.

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Cranberry Jam
Apr 8, 2011


theDoubleH posted:

Quick question. I'm making stock from leftover chicken bones. I know I'm supposed to be skimming it, but what am I trying to skim exactly? Is it the foam that bubbles to the top, or the gray/brown gunky stuff that collects under the fat? Or both? I feel the latter will be much harder to get as it doesn't collect together the way the foam does.

The gunky brown/gray foam stuff.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

theDoubleH posted:

Quick question. I'm making stock from leftover chicken bones. I know I'm supposed to be skimming it, but what am I trying to skim exactly? Is it the foam that bubbles to the top, or the gray/brown gunky stuff that collects under the fat? Or both? I feel the latter will be much harder to get as it doesn't collect together the way the foam does.

Cranberry Jam is correct about removing the scum that accumulates on top, but the fat is easy to remove. After you've finished simmering the stock for hours (never let it boil!), strain it and let it cool to room temperature. You can either put the whole stock pot in there, covered, or you can go ahead and pour it into individual plastic containers. After a few hours in the fridge the fat will all float to the top and congeal into a solid layer. You can lift this out if you want a fat-free stock, or leave it there as a protective layer, or whatever works for you.

The good silky and slightly thick mouthefeel of homemade stock from bones is a result of collagen being leached from the bones during the simmering process, turning into gelatin (like flavorless Jell-O). Lots of people think that rich stocks are full of fat, but gelatin is totally different and gives that experience and structure of an emulsion like cream or mayonnaise without the actual fat.

Calves' feet make truly amazing stock. I'm drooling like Homer Simpson right now.

SurgicalOntologist
Jun 17, 2004



Under the fat you mean? Because the bubbles on top look like foam, the gunky bray/brown stuff under the fat looks more like small pieces of skin or something.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Yes - that is what you want to get rid off..

Would an alternative be to clarify with eggwhites? Anyone?

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

theDoubleH posted:

Under the fat you mean? Because the bubbles on top look like foam, the gunky bray/brown stuff under the fat looks more like small pieces of skin or something.

The brown/grey scum is under and on top of the fat, because there's some convection and the scum gets mixed with air and gets on top of the fat, which will always be on top of the water because of its lower density.

SurgicalOntologist
Jun 17, 2004



Thank you. So I guess the scum and foam (scum mixed with air) are the same and I should remove both. Makes sense.

clockwork automaton
May 2, 2007

You've probably never heard of them.



Fun Shoe

I'm looking to make a soup or a stew for dinner next week (all next week, actually I live alone and cook one meal and eat it all week). Does anyone have any go to recipes that they love? There isn't much I won't eat, especially since I realized many foods I thought I didn't like was because of things being cooked poorly/incorrectly.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

clockwork automaton posted:

I'm looking to make a soup or a stew for dinner next week (all next week, actually I live alone and cook one meal and eat it all week). Does anyone have any go to recipes that they love? There isn't much I won't eat, especially since I realized many foods I thought I didn't like was because of things being cooked poorly/incorrectly.

There's a lot of classic French recipes that fit the bill and are pretty easy. Bœuf Bourguignon, Coq au Vin, and Pot-au-feu. Don't let the names scare you, they're dead easy to make and are from the days before refrigeration and everything. You'd make a big batch on Sunday and keep eating it for days afterwards. There's lots of recipes out there, just look for the ones that are simpler. You really don't need to overthink it like the Julia Child BB recipe that everyone raves about because of the Julie & Julia movie. Also take a look at Choucroute Garnie from Alsace, which is all cured meats and sauerkraut, if you like German food.

P.S. Such cooking methods are the origin of the English nursery rhyme:

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

theDoubleH posted:

Thank you. So I guess the scum and foam (scum mixed with air) are the same and I should remove both. Makes sense.

If you read Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential, he talks about cooks eating the "raft", which is all the scum and foam and meat scraps from the stock pots in commercial kitchens. It's something you wouldn't serve to prisoners, but there are times when you just need some nourishment, no matter how foul.

If it's OK to mention things like this, I'm currently smoking a bunch of chicken legs with cherry wood. The legs were brined with a white wine vinegar/pomegranate juice brine, and once they're done I'll fire up the grill and cook some summer squash and radicchio over flame. Nice little end of summer dinner.

HClChicken
Aug 15, 2005

Highly trained by the US military at expedient semen processing.


Casu Marzu posted:

Cut up, simmer with a lot of cabbage or sauerkraut and a bottle of beer. Serve with good spicy mustard and some hard rolls.

Serve with chips, or something more german?

Cyril Sneer
Aug 8, 2004

Life would be simple in the forest except for Cyril Sneer. And his life would be simple except for The Raccoons.

I love roasted asparagus. Ususally I just season with salt, pepper, garlic powder, parmesean, and sprinkle some balsamic vinegar overtop at the end. What are some of alls ya'lls favourite seasonings for roasted asparagus?

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Hey, Bartolimu? From everyone in #goonswithspoons, gently caress you.

(USER WAS BANNED FOR THIS POST)

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Happy Hat posted:

Yes - that is what you want to get rid off..

Would an alternative be to clarify with eggwhites? Anyone?

Yeah, you can. I believe you can use agar to clarify as well, and it's less touchy than the egg raft.


quote:

Serve with chips, or something more german?

Chips would work. Maybe a potato salad or something not too heavy.

Casu Marzu fucked around with this message at Sep 17, 2011 around 20:18

MrBishop
Sep 29, 2006

I see what you did there...

General Venereal posted:

I'm not sure which thread this question would be more appropriate in - but I have a Spanish thyme plant and I'm not going to be able to use all the leaves before the plant inevitably starts dying on me. Anyone know if it's better to dry the thyme (in the oven), or freeze it? I'm hoping to preserve as much flavor as possible, for as long as possible.

I have a question related to General Venereal's about keeping herbs (or veggies, in my case). Just as a fun experiment, I picked up a couple little habañero starters in the Spring, and now have nice pepper bushes full of delicious, gut-burning golden goodies. The problem is, I'd like to be able to save them (or at least, their heat) for making chili this winter. Is there a good way to do that, while maintaining as much flavor as possible? It really wouldn't break my heart to make a steaming pot of chile for the next 8 weeks to use them up, but I'd really prefer to space it out a bit.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



MrBishop posted:

I have a question related to General Venereal's about keeping herbs (or veggies, in my case). Just as a fun experiment, I picked up a couple little habañero starters in the Spring, and now have nice pepper bushes full of delicious, gut-burning golden goodies. The problem is, I'd like to be able to save them (or at least, their heat) for making chili this winter. Is there a good way to do that, while maintaining as much flavor as possible? It really wouldn't break my heart to make a steaming pot of chile for the next 8 weeks to use them up, but I'd really prefer to space it out a bit.

As with my answer to his question, dry em.

HClChicken
Aug 15, 2005

Highly trained by the US military at expedient semen processing.


Casu Marzu posted:

Yeah, you can. I believe you can use agar to clarify as well, and it's less touchy than the egg raft.


Chips would work. Maybe a potato salad or something not too heavy.

Thank you, worked out great. I didn't really know what to do so I diced the ham, browned it in some oil quickly. tossed in a little bit of broth, beer and red cabbage. Cooked for about 30 minutes. Served on toasted kaiser roll with dijon (no real hot mustard).

Made a dill german potato salad that was good as well.

Drink and Fight
Feb 2, 2003

hoot, hoot, hoot, hoot hoot hoot hoot hoothoothoothoothoothoothoot hoooohootohtothotootothtoto, hoot


Where am I supposed to talk about Pr0k's mom now?

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Pol Pot Pie posted:

Where am I supposed to talk about Pr0k's mom now?

Here is fine, but only if that's the name of a recipe you're looking to make.

SurgicalOntologist
Jun 17, 2004



Stock question #2: Is it safe to let it cool overnight, outside? Overnight low is 42 F. Last time I made stock it was below zero so I went for it.

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


theDoubleH posted:

Stock question #2: Is it safe to let it cool overnight, outside? Overnight low is 42 F. Last time I made stock it was below zero so I went for it.

No.

Dogfish
Nov 4, 2009


theDoubleH posted:

Stock question #2: Is it safe to let it cool overnight, outside? Overnight low is 42 F. Last time I made stock it was below zero so I went for it.

Google says that 42°F is 5.5°C, which is (barely) in the danger zone for bacterial growth. The outside temperature is also likely to fluctuate, so you have no idea how long your stock would be in that danger zone, or where in the zone it would fall. Basically, you would be sending bacteria an engraved invitation to come flourish in your stock (which is a great growth medium for them anyway).

SurgicalOntologist
Jun 17, 2004



Crap. Well turns out there's nothing too important in the freezer so I'll just put it there.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

theDoubleH posted:

Stock question #2: Is it safe to let it cool overnight, outside? Overnight low is 42 F. Last time I made stock it was below zero so I went for it.

Forget the temperature issues, you've spent a big chunk of your day working on a nice stock. At night the raccoons, stray dogs, cats, Sasquatch, and anything else that might possibly knock it over will be dying to drink that delicious substance. Even in the best case scenario you're going to have lots of ants.

An unheated, closed-door garage in the winter when it gets really cold? Maybe.

Also, this should be obvious, but don't put the hot stock in your fridge or freezer. Let it cool to room temperature first, otherwise you'll just warm up everything else nearby, leading to spoilage or freezer burn.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

And on the topic of food outside... Smoke goes a long way to keeping the insects off. This was dinner as mentioned earlier:

Cranberry Jam
Apr 8, 2011


theDoubleH posted:

Stock question #2: Is it safe to let it cool overnight, outside? Overnight low is 42 F. Last time I made stock it was below zero so I went for it.

I stick a water bottle or two of ice in the pot and then put it in the refrigerator with some ice packs or in a cooler with cold packs or ice.

e: Your grilling looks outstanding benito. I love grilled veggies.

Cranberry Jam fucked around with this message at Sep 18, 2011 around 01:17

SurgicalOntologist
Jun 17, 2004



Thanks for all the tips. Luckily when I did this last winter Sasquatch didn't get my stock. It probably helped that it was on a second-floor roof buried in snow. Anyways, I was afraid to let it cool to room temperature because I thought that could take a while (it's a huge pot) and be a risk. But my freezer is completely empty besides a couple bags of ice and a loaf of bread that I might as well move to the fridge. It was previously filled with a few zip loc bags each of chicken and vegetable scraps, but now those are all in the stock!

Also Cranberry Jam, good idea with the water bottle. Should speed the cool to room temperature part.

Mach420
Jun 22, 2002
Bandit at 6 'o clock - Pull my finger

benito posted:

Forget the temperature issues, you've spent a big chunk of your day working on a nice stock. At night the raccoons, stray dogs, cats, Sasquatch, and anything else that might possibly knock it over will be dying to drink that delicious substance. Even in the best case scenario you're going to have lots of ants.

An unheated, closed-door garage in the winter when it gets really cold? Maybe.

Also, this should be obvious, but don't put the hot stock in your fridge or freezer. Let it cool to room temperature first, otherwise you'll just warm up everything else nearby, leading to spoilage or freezer burn.

That gives me an idea. The next time I make stock, I'm repurposing my copper coil wort chiller that I use for 5 gallon batches of homebrew beer and using it for the stock. If any of you guys make a ton of stock and need quick chilling, making one of these is a great idea.



On topic, I'm about to smoke up a big chunk of pulled pork tomorrow. Is brining a good idea or is putting on some rub and saran wrapping it overnight good enough?

MrBishop
Sep 29, 2006

I see what you did there...

Mach420 posted:

On topic, I'm about to smoke up a big chunk of pulled pork tomorrow. Is brining a good idea or is putting on some rub and saran wrapping it overnight good enough?

I'd like to hear some other opinions on this as well, but here's my experience from about a month ago. I had a roughly 6 lb butt roast that I made pulled pork out of. No brining, no previous prep. Just before putting on the grill, I covered the whole thing in thin coat of mustard, then covered with homemade rub. After that, onto the grill it went, for about 8 or 9 hours if I remember right. Toward the end, I basted with a mix of 2 parts vinegar, 1 part apple juice, 1 part cooking oil.

I was very satisfied with the results, but expanding on Mach420's question, is there some pre-cook prep that should be done to the meat to make it even more delicious?

edit:
Oops, checked my post in the grilling thread that I made about this, I actually cooked the thing 11 hours. Here's what this beautiful butt looked like after just two hours:

MrBishop fucked around with this message at Sep 18, 2011 around 02:11

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Mach420 posted:

On topic, I'm about to smoke up a big chunk of pulled pork tomorrow. Is brining a good idea or is putting on some rub and saran wrapping it overnight good enough?

With pork shoulder, I think an apple cider brine is incredible. But choice of wood for smoking is more influential on the flavor. Lately I've been crazy about apple and cherry. Alder's great too. Hickory is the standard, but I'm bored with it. Mesquite, eh, too bitter with grilling and just nasty for long smoking.

I recently smoked a chuck roast, which is a lot easier than brisket. I was happy with the tacos that resulted:



If anyone has been interested in my advice or recipes, I do write a wine/food/etc. blog that has six years' worth of back posts, easily searchable by topic. Benito's Wine Reviews. Mods, not trying to break any rules here, I linked my site a few times in the now dead wine thread. I don't have plat, but feel free to ask me if you have any wine questions.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



So after going on a sopranos binge, in one of the last episodes Tony orders a sandwich with vinegar peppers. Does anyone know where I can buy these in the UK? They sound like the perfect addition to literally every sandwich I make

SurgicalOntologist
Jun 17, 2004



Here in the northeast US they are in the supermarket, either in the international aisle or with other canned and jarred vegetables. Look for cherry peppers, in a jar. They come in hot or sweet. If they're not in the supermarket, look for an italian deli if one's around, otherwise you can probably make your own from pimentos.

edit: I put them in all my sandwiches too, along with my homemade pickled thinly sliced red onions. Anyone know if you can buy these premade in the US? I can never find any.

SurgicalOntologist fucked around with this message at Sep 18, 2011 around 02:46

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Ah are they just cherry peppers? I thought they'd be just pickled bell peppers jarred. May have to just do it myself. I recently discovered the joy of slicing pickled onions into sandwiches.

Edit: the sandwich I made for lunch yesterday, a really nice spicy salami, chedder, pickled jalapenos, pickled onion sliced, home grown tomato, lettuce and this

rockcity
Jan 16, 2004


So today I received my ice cream maker that I ordered a few days ago and all excited I ran out and bought all my ingredients, made my base, froze my bowl and then found out...they forgot to put the mixing paddle in the box with the ice cream maker. Lovely. I'm going to call Cuisinart in the morning to get that resolved, but my question is, how long should my ice cream base be good for in the fridge? The ingredients are all fresh as I bought them today, so they don't expire any time soon, but I wasn't sure if applying heat or mixing in the other ingredients would matter at all. Should it be ok in the fridge for a week while I wait for the paddle? Should I freeze it and re-melt it? Just curious if anyone has any more knowledge on this than I.

heeebrew
Sep 6, 2007

Weed smokin', joint tokin', fake Jew of the Weed thread


So I baked a kombocha squash and I was thinking of using it to make a "healthy" bastardized version of pumpkin pie using the squash and graham crackers. Any ideas?

notwithoutmyanus
Mar 17, 2009


Powdered Toast Man posted:

(USER WAS BANNED FOR THIS POST)

Man, I'm not exactly upfront happy about the changes but so what? It's not my forum, I don't manage it, and the mods said they'd be perfectly happy to discuss it via PM's (and keeping it out of the thread).

My question is: where do we talk now, about grilling?

I wanted to ask if it's really worth it to always get a weber or if people just generally spend a shitload of money on em for the brand name?

notwithoutmyanus fucked around with this message at Sep 18, 2011 around 03:59

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

heeebrew posted:

So I baked a kombocha squash and I was thinking of using it to make a "healthy" bastardized version of pumpkin pie using the squash and graham crackers. Any ideas?

I went on a squash binge a few years ago. They're all pretty much the same health-wise. When I want pumpkin flavor, I use butternut because it's a lot easier to cook. Acorn squash is a good neutral option that can go sweet or savory depending on how you're serving it. Turban squash is just difficult. Kabocha? Nothing special, but with small round squashes you can do cool things like bake it with a custard inside after you scoop out the seeds. That was a favorite of George Washington, so you can serve it and say that you're kicking it old school.

bloody ghost titty
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


notwithoutmyanus posted:

Man, I'm not exactly upfront happy about the changes but so what?

Straight up this thread is a wholesale improvement on the "hey can i get a flavor pairing" we so missed, but can a guy get a link to the #gws irc up in here?

For content, rockcity, if you freeze you ice cream base you can let it sit until you get the paddle since the whole mess is meant to get froze. Since you will be freezing it to serve, letting the base chill out will do no harm.

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

Hold the line, I have shitposting to do.


So why were great threads like the cheese thread, the Indian thread, the industry thread (holy crap, some of us work in the FOOD industry) and the bread thread? I don't see how these needed to be in the culling. I'm not mod sassing, I just don't see why those in particular were cut when threads like the vegan thread are a-ok?

Edit: just noticed a ban for sassing about the changes. I'm not looking for trouble, I just wondered about those threads in particular. I thought they are great resources and that's one of the reasons I use GWS is for the resources we have. The wiki is made from threads like that. For example (not pimping it because it happened to be mine, I'm just really familiar with it) the cheese thread is where 100% of the cheese stuff on the wiki cake from. Again, Not trying to get probated or banned, if I can't ask about that here I'll delete this and shush.

Croatoan fucked around with this message at Sep 18, 2011 around 04:55

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Eat This Glob
Jan 14, 2008

hurry up with my damn croissants


Lipstick Apathy

Vegetable Melange posted:

Straight up this thread is a wholesale improvement on the "hey can i get a flavor pairing" we so missed, but can a guy get a link to the #gws irc up in here?

Pretty sure it's synirc.net, channel is #gws.

Content: again, thanks for the split pea suggestion dino., I'm going to work on a do-over on Wednesday. It should be much better.

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