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Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Skinny King Pimp posted:

Okay, here are the pictures of the tree out back.
Tree with fruit on it:


Fruit in my hand:


Size of the thorns (they're sharp enough to really hurt if you're not paying attention and run into the tree at all):


Like I said, there are probably 15-20 seeds in each of those fruits and hardly any actual flesh. You get probably a tsp or two of juice out of one, and it's an opaque orangish yellow. The rind is pretty thick and has a little fuzz on it. I just want to be sure it's safe to eat before I go pick all the ripe fruits off to make fancy colored gin cocktails and mojo sauce with the juice.

Bitter orange.

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Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



Not The Wendigo posted:

A lot of recipes for soups and other water-cooked foods say "boil, then reduce to a simmer". I can sort of see why it might be important for recipes where you boil, then add ingredients, then simmer. That way adding everything reduces the water to the proper temp. But why do some recipes say "add ingredients, boil, simmer"?

Bring to boil, then reduce heat to keep the vigorous boiling from turning everything into mush.

Neko Sou
Jan 24, 2006
Scarved Wonder

I feel like this belongs here more than the Watch and Woot thread but I have a bad feeling I'll be chased out of here with pitchforks and torches for asking... but does anyone have any experience with Weight Watchers and WW-friendly recipes? I've been making things like tuna noodle casserole and I'd kind of like to fancy it up a bit more than that. The problem is you can't really use as much of the delicious stuff (olive oil, butter, cheese, breadcrumbs) in the quantities you'd usually want, so you're a little handicapped.

On that note, I've been kind of thinking about making my own sushi at home. Sushi is allowed on weight watchers (in the right quantities/with the right ingredients, obviously) My husband had a really crappy spicy tuna roll last night (sloppily assembled, really crappy sauce--usually I don't like spicy mayo but this stuff had no spice at all) and I started to think I could probably do it better myself. I know you need sashimi or sushi grade fish, and while I'm not sure if we have a great selection at the usual grocery stores in my small little town there is a huge international grocery store nearby(Jungle Jim's, for anyone in Ohio) that is almost guaranteed to have the proper cut of fish. But I'm a little nervous about working with raw fish. I feel like if it's from a reputable place and the right grade it should be fine, but I dunno. Thoughts?

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Hey folks, I just saw this thread in SA-Mart Coupons about a free e-book full of Chili, Soup and Stew recipes: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3438119

With cold weather approaching, I thought that would be handy to know about. It's a freebie at the Amazon Kindle store.

Bertrand Hustle
Apr 29, 2007

Ah, music to my ears.


Neko Sou posted:

I feel like this belongs here more than the Watch and Woot thread but I have a bad feeling I'll be chased out of here with pitchforks and torches for asking... but does anyone have any experience with Weight Watchers and WW-friendly recipes? I've been making things like tuna noodle casserole and I'd kind of like to fancy it up a bit more than that. The problem is you can't really use as much of the delicious stuff (olive oil, butter, cheese, breadcrumbs) in the quantities you'd usually want, so you're a little handicapped.

You're on the right track in that you are paying attention to what you're eating. WW just gives you a framework for doing that. That said, I'm not going to trash your diet, if it's working for you, but my guess is that they taste a little bland because they're cutting down all fats and carbs.

Olive oil is good for you. I'm not suggesting you drink it, but if you want to cook something in a couple glugs of olive oil, go for it. Butter is fine in moderation, as is cheese (but generally depends on the cheese). I might catch some flak for this, but some butter substitutes like Smart Balance taste very good. Not regular margarine, I hate the stuff, but SB is a fairly good butter substitute that I use because my dad had high blood pressure and I actually like it. You can't bake with it, but for frying eggs, putting on toast, nearly anything you can use butter for, you can use it in and it tastes good.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Neko Sou posted:

I feel like this belongs here more than the Watch and Woot thread but I have a bad feeling I'll be chased out of here with pitchforks and torches for asking... but does anyone have any experience with Weight Watchers and WW-friendly recipes? I've been making things like tuna noodle casserole and I'd kind of like to fancy it up a bit more than that. The problem is you can't really use as much of the delicious stuff (olive oil, butter, cheese, breadcrumbs) in the quantities you'd usually want, so you're a little handicapped.

On that note, I've been kind of thinking about making my own sushi at home. Sushi is allowed on weight watchers (in the right quantities/with the right ingredients, obviously) My husband had a really crappy spicy tuna roll last night (sloppily assembled, really crappy sauce--usually I don't like spicy mayo but this stuff had no spice at all) and I started to think I could probably do it better myself. I know you need sashimi or sushi grade fish, and while I'm not sure if we have a great selection at the usual grocery stores in my small little town there is a huge international grocery store nearby(Jungle Jim's, for anyone in Ohio) that is almost guaranteed to have the proper cut of fish. But I'm a little nervous about working with raw fish. I feel like if it's from a reputable place and the right grade it should be fine, but I dunno. Thoughts?

To my recollection (my parents had great success on WW), Weight Watchers is just counting calories simplified into a points system. If that's still the case, people here will (or should) generally have more respect for it than something stupid like paleo/raw/keto/southbeach/cabbagesoup diets.

Don't be afraid of raw fish, your eyes and nose will tell you if you shouldn't eat it. Fish should not smell "fishy" it should smell clean and like seawater. The flesh shouldn't be pasty it should be firm. From frozen is fine, in fact, since you live in Ohio, I'd be willing to bet that all of the fish you find there for sashimi comes in the back door frozen, both at supermarkets, and at restaurants. If I were just starting making sushi, I'd be more worried about getting the rice right, because that's where most people, including restaurants, mess up.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Neko Sou posted:

but does anyone have any experience with Weight Watchers and WW-friendly recipes?
Heck yeah! Cooking points friendly meals is easy as hell once you take a look at what the plan encourages:
- Lean proteins
- Lots of veggies
- Low fats
- Smaller portions

Spices are basically free and that opens up a world of seasoning. You shouldn't ever worry about bland food when doing WW since you can always bust out the hot sauce and go to town.

Remember that portion control is a major part of the plan so weigh and measure *everything*. Grab a 1 cup measure and scoop out your final product so you can really see how much that is on your plate. Get smaller plates and it will look like more food and once you've had a chance to eat it and enjoy the meal, you aren't as likely to be hungry. Retraining yourself as to how to think about food is part of the process.

Here are a few recipes I made while learning how things work. It uses the old points system, I haven't recalculated for PointsPlus, sorry.

wafflesnsegways
Jan 12, 2008
And that's why I was forced to surgically attach your hands to your face.

Yeah, raw fish is generally pretty safe. Most sushi places use flash frozen fish that isn't really different from what you'd be getting. If there's an upscale supermarket around, you can talk to the people behind the fish counter and tell them what you have in mind, and they'll probably help you out.

Tuna is one of the easiest fish to assess, because you can tell the freshness by a quick glance at the color. It should be a deep, rich red or red-purple, not greyish or browning. Just buy it frozen - it came to the supermarket that way anyway.

regulargonzalez
Aug 18, 2006

More pretentious than thou


Anyone have a good recipe for sarmale and mamaliga? Fell in love with this combo in Romania, I've tried multiple recipes online but none quite get it right.

uberwekkness
Jul 25, 2008

You have to train harder to make it to nationals.

Hey guys, I got a pumpkin cupcake recipe recently that I keep wanting to try. It calls for 2/3 cup pumpkin. I've only worked with canned pumpkin stuff to make lazy people pumpkin pie. Soooo, how do I do this? Is this the stuff you pull out from inside a pumpkin? Do I have to do anything special with it before integrating it into a recipe? Help!

CzarChasm
Mar 14, 2009

Blah Blah Blah
Look at me
I'm the Goddamn Batman
Blah Blah Blah


uberwekkness posted:

Hey guys, I got a pumpkin cupcake recipe recently that I keep wanting to try. It calls for 2/3 cup pumpkin. I've only worked with canned pumpkin stuff to make lazy people pumpkin pie. Soooo, how do I do this? Is this the stuff you pull out from inside a pumpkin? Do I have to do anything special with it before integrating it into a recipe? Help!

I believe that typically if a recipe calls for pumpkin it is referring to the "meat" of the fruit, ie, the bits between the skin and the goop. Most people would recommend buying a small sugar pumpkin, cut off the top and remove the guts, seeds and stringy bits. (Save the seeds for snacking) Cut the whole thing into reasonable chunks (1-2 inches), and roast in a 350 oven for ~30 min or until softened. However, even with a small pumpkin, that's a hell of a lot of squash and you only need 2/3 cup. I'm firmly in the camp of "it's not worth it" for pumpkin baked goods. I just buy the canned stuff.

___________________________________________________________________

I have a request of my own. I picked up some empanada shells (rounds?) a few weekends ago, and I was going to fill them with corned beef and other goodies and make Ruben empanadas, but there weren't enough leftovers to do that with.

So now, I'm looking for a tasty seasoned rice/beef combo to stuff with them instead. I got as far as sauteing onion, garlic and bell peppers, and then toasting some rice in there, adding chicken broth and maybe some tomato juice, but then I run out of ideas.

The plan was to go for a bit of a Tex/Mex combo, but if there are some more traditional seasoned rice recipes I'd be glad to listen to them.

Also, it pains me to admit, but I married a spice wuss, so this can't go above a mild jalapeno as far as spice goes.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

uberwekkness posted:

Hey guys, I got a pumpkin cupcake recipe recently that I keep wanting to try. It calls for 2/3 cup pumpkin. I've only worked with canned pumpkin stuff to make lazy people pumpkin pie. Soooo, how do I do this? Is this the stuff you pull out from inside a pumpkin? Do I have to do anything special with it before integrating it into a recipe? Help!

Canned pumpkin is actually one of the best canned foods available, although it might be mostly butternut squash, but you won't really notice the difference. To get the smooth paste that you need for a ravioli filling or a sauce or a soup or a dessert, canned will save you a load of time and effort (and it's more environmentally friendly because you're not paying for tons of rind and guts that were shipped from many states or countries away).

Just make sure you buy the 100% pumpkin, not the canned pumpkin pie filling that's full of all sorts of weird things.

If you want fresh pumpkin, buy from a local farmer's market and do dishes like roasting cubes or cooking something inside the squash that makes for a neat presentation. For example, I made an Argentine stew in a small pumpkin a few years ago.

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Neko Sou posted:

I feel like this belongs here more than the Watch and Woot thread but I have a bad feeling I'll be chased out of here with pitchforks and torches for asking... but does anyone have any experience with Weight Watchers and WW-friendly recipes? I've been making things like tuna noodle casserole and I'd kind of like to fancy it up a bit more than that. The problem is you can't really use as much of the delicious stuff (olive oil, butter, cheese, breadcrumbs) in the quantities you'd usually want, so you're a little handicapped.

As others have mentioned, spices are free, as are herbs! This is the time to get yourself acquainted with different spices and different herbs. Basil, oregano, chives, scallions, and parsley taste good on just about anything. Throw on a bit of lemon or lime juice, and your steamed veg will sing! If you can't use too much fat, dry toast your spices to bring up the flavours, then crush them in a pestle and mortar or a coffee grinder, and then sprinkle liberally onto your food. Raw courgettes, sliced thin, and tossed with rice vinegar, soy sauce, a couple of drops of toasted sesame oil (it's got a very strong flavour, so just a few drops go a long way), and scallions are a wonderful and filling side dish. Use the same sort of dressing for shredded cabbage, carrots, daikon, whatever.

Get your hands on some Tofu Shirataki Noodles (the broad kind) instead of using regular pasta. It's very low in calories (about 40 calories for an 8-oz pouch). Eat as many fresh veggies as you can get your hands on, and bulk out your meals.

What one of my friends does is to keep a blend of rice vinegar and balsamic vinegar, with a bit of salt and mustard in it, in a spray bottle in his fridge. When he wants to eat a salad, he gives the greens a quick splash of the vinegar for a boost of flavour on the greens without adding any fat.

Chiles are also an excellent source of flavour, as is black pepper. Don't be afraid to turn up the heat.

You can definitely do this if you start exploring the things you /can/ eat, rather than worrying about all the things you can't eat and trying (unsuccessfully) to substitute them. Then, when you want something that's a little on the indulgent side, you can spend your points on it.

One more thing a friend on WW told me that worked for her. Don't bank your points over the week if you can help it. Try to use up the points in a day. If you go under, just pretend you didn't have them, and move on. It avoids over-eating and getting yourself even more miserable later on, once the high-calorie thing is gone. If you spread our your points over the day, and have a little something something more frequently, you don't feel like you're on this depravation thing.

You can do this! I know you can! Just take a look at some of the wonderful recipes out there that don't need that much fat to begin with, and start exploring your spices and herbs! This is an adventure! Use the opportunity to reacquaint yourself with your food, and really have fun with it. I know you can do it!

Mozi
Apr 4, 2004

The door blew shut but here's the deal
Dreams are lies, it's the dreaming that's real


I have a bunch of extra sauce/topping made of sliced red onion, chopped bacon and beer. What's the best thing to put it on? Already had it on rockfish (delicious).

VVV I'm hungry again already... Although unless I'm wrong, you're saying "It's good on everything, stupid."

Mozi fucked around with this message at Sep 20, 2011 around 03:22

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


Mozi posted:

I have a bunch of extra sauce/topping made of sliced red onion, chopped bacon and beer. What's the best thing to put it on? Already had it on rockfish (delicious).

Put it on a burger. Or on toast. Or eat it with a spoon. Add it to a salad. stuff it into chicken. Add it to pasta.

uberwekkness
Jul 25, 2008

You have to train harder to make it to nationals.

Canned it is. Thanks!

Skinny King Pimp
Aug 25, 2011
Skinny Queen Wimp

notwithoutmyanus posted:

I'm hardly an expert on this, but maybe when you pick them you'll need to give them time to ripen, as with anything potentially underripe?

Just a general idea/general suggestion.

Citrus doesn't ripen once it's been picked.

Mr. Wiggles posted:

Bitter orange.

Thanks! Gonna try to figure out things to do with it later.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

I'm looking for a really, really good veal marsala recipe. Maybe something with wild mushrooms, which I can get at my local farmer's market. It's my wife's favorite dish, and I really want to make it for her.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007


Odd question for GWS and please don't hate me for it. I don't eat any fish. I can't stand the smell of it and that gets into the taste so I don't eat it. Having said that, I have tried quite a few different kinds of fish in the last 10 years or so. Shark thigh, self caught trout and salmon. Same gag reaction from all of them.

What I want to know is if I'd experience this with sushi? Part of why I hate the smell of fish is the smell of it cooking. I have never eaten sushi and decided to wait until I can try some from somewhere high quality. Am I making a mistake here and will just end up wasting money and should try one of those crappy supermarket sushi lunch boxes?

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


You most likely will not - there's a huge difference.. and by the way - it is only a small sum to find out if you're truly fish adverse.

(Plus - there's the added bonus of brain-slugs!!)

User-Friendly
Apr 27, 2008

Is There a God? (Pt. 9)


I recently moved into a kitchen that has severely limited my cooking space, and I need recipe recommendations. I currently only have 2 burners and a microwave, but no oven. If a large pot is on one of the burners, the other is completely unusable, so there's a size restriction as well. I'm increasingly tired of pasta and stir-fry, so I was wondering if there were any other, perhaps more complicated, dishes I should attempt?

Also, it's a shared kitchen so I can't have anything on for an extreme amount of time.

Fig Newton
Oct 29, 2005



User-Friendly posted:

I recently moved into a kitchen that has severely limited my cooking space, and I need recipe recommendations. I currently only have 2 burners and a microwave, but no oven. If a large pot is on one of the burners, the other is completely unusable, so there's a size restriction as well. I'm increasingly tired of pasta and stir-fry, so I was wondering if there were any other, perhaps more complicated, dishes I should attempt?

Also, it's a shared kitchen so I can't have anything on for an extreme amount of time.

To clarify:

1. How many people are you cooking for? Just yourself? i.e what sort of quantities of food are we looking at.

2. What qualifies to your roomies as an "extreme amount of time"? How soon do they need their burners back? 15 minutes? 30 minutes? An hour? Three hours?

3. How much refrigerator and freezer space do you have? Are you wanting to cook meals ahead and freeze/store them in Tupperware or freezer bags?

4. What are your food preferences? Allergies? Vegan? Things you will/will not eat (onions, mushrooms, shrimp, etc.)?

5. What is your food budget? Pick one. (A) Broke. (B) Everybody else. Because if you were (C) Filthy Rich you wouldn't be sharing burners with roomies.

Generally speaking, the majority of normal everyday cooking doesn't require all four burners going all at once; you've been watching too many cooking shows where the host has to fit his meal into a 22-minute time slot.

Assuming that you're cooking for one:
Fried chicken, boiled/mashed potatoes, peas. Fry the chicken on a burner. Do it in a small enough frying pan that you can fit a small saucepan on the other burner. This will be cooking your potatoes. Cook the peas in the microwave. Or, cook the chicken first, set it aside, cook your potatoes.

Expand this basic principle to basically anything you wanna eat. Sear the salmon/steak/burger patty/other kind of fish in the frying pan, cook the potatoes in a saucepan on the other burner, do the veg in the microwave. Veg does beautifully in microwaves. Make sure you mop out the microwave afterwards, it tends to generate a lot of wet.

You can also cook in segments: While the potatoes are cooking on the back burner, cook the sauce for the fish in a small saucepan on the front burner, set it aside, then use the front burner for cooking the fish.

It's not a question of "magic recipes for small kitchens", see, it's a question of deciding what ya wanna eat and then figuring out how to implement it. It's more logistics than cuisine.

If your big pasta boiler is taking up the entire stove, then cook the pasta first, drain it, shock it with cold water, drain it again, and let it sit while you cook the rest of the meal.

Also, get an electric rice cooker, they are awesome. Even the $20 models work fine.

A convection toaster oven also has many possibilities far beyond TV dinners. They sell them at Target.

User-Friendly
Apr 27, 2008

Is There a God? (Pt. 9)


Fig Newton posted:

To clarify:

1. How many people are you cooking for? Just yourself? i.e what sort of quantities of food are we looking at.

2. What qualifies to your roomies as an "extreme amount of time"? How soon do they need their burners back? 15 minutes? 30 minutes? An hour? Three hours?

3. How much refrigerator and freezer space do you have? Are you wanting to cook meals ahead and freeze/store them in Tupperware or freezer bags?

4. What are your food preferences? Allergies? Vegan? Things you will/will not eat (onions, mushrooms, shrimp, etc.)?

5. What is your food budget? Pick one. (A) Broke. (B) Everybody else. Because if you were (C) Filthy Rich you wouldn't be sharing burners with roomies.

...

It's not a question of "magic recipes for small kitchens", see, it's a question of deciding what ya wanna eat and then figuring out how to implement it. It's more logistics than cuisine.

I'd normally just be cooking for me, and I'll eat pretty much anything. Unfortunately, I'm closer to "broke" than anything else. Also, the fridge is ridiculously crowded. There's ten of us sharing this kitchen, so it's more or less a constant struggle to find space in there. The reason I mentioned time restriction was on the scale of hours, avoiding making soups and similar projects.

I'm not exactly a cooking regular, so I'm more making recipe requests with such restrictions in mind instead of scaling down already-known recipes.

Dogfish
Nov 4, 2009


Skinny King Pimp posted:

Thanks! Gonna try to figure out things to do with it later.

Marmalade!!

Dane
Jun 18, 2003

mmm... creamy.


Skinny King Pimp posted:

Thanks! Gonna try to figure out things to do with it later.

Make marmalade!

e: ^ you bastard! ^

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


User-Friendly posted:

I recently moved into a kitchen that has severely limited my cooking space, and I need recipe recommendations. I currently only have 2 burners and a microwave, but no oven. If a large pot is on one of the burners, the other is completely unusable, so there's a size restriction as well. I'm increasingly tired of pasta and stir-fry, so I was wondering if there were any other, perhaps more complicated, dishes I should attempt?

Also, it's a shared kitchen so I can't have anything on for an extreme amount of time.
Since you already know stir-fry, it's just a short jump up to poriyal, which can be made with any quick cooking veg. Green beans, collard greens, kale, cabbage, zucchini, whatever you have does the job. You can skip the coconut if it's difficult to find. The curry leaves are also optional. It's mainly the turmeric, mustard seed, and asafoetida that give it its flavour. The technique is very similar to stir-frying, except that you're starting off with whole spices. Everything else follows.

Also, it's a very short jump from there to daal, which can be made from any tinned beans. This way you're not spending forever and a day on waiting for beans to boil. Daal is quite good with any manner of bread or flatbread, as well as rice.

Fig Newton
Oct 29, 2005



User-Friendly posted:

I'd normally just be cooking for me, and I'll eat pretty much anything. Unfortunately, I'm closer to "broke" than anything else. Also, the fridge is ridiculously crowded. There's ten of us sharing this kitchen, so it's more or less a constant struggle to find space in there. The reason I mentioned time restriction was on the scale of hours, avoiding making soups and similar projects.

I'm not exactly a cooking regular, so I'm more making recipe requests with such restrictions in mind instead of scaling down already-known recipes.

Okay, so, no stock.

Welp, somebody who's broke and eats pretty much anything could do worse than investigate Indian food as mentioned above. Since fuel is at a premium on the Indian subcontinent, most Indian food tends to cook fast and is mostly a matter of assembly of ingredients, rather than of "using all the burners simultaneously to cook a lot of stuff".

The vegan thread has a lot of good, interesting, different Indian recipes in it.
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3413016

I am a personal fan of Manjula's cooking style.
http://www.youtube.com/user/Manjulaskitchen

Also of Maangchi, which is Korean.
http://www.youtube.com/user/Maangchi

Dunno what kind of Chinese stir-fry you've been doing, but there's more to it than beef and broccoli.
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3401971

I would also browse the GWS Wiki, see what I felt like eating. Not all of it requires reducing a sauce for 5 hours.
http://www.goonswithspoons.com/Welc...ons_With_Spoons

Drink and Fight
Feb 2, 2003

hoot, hoot, hoot, hoot hoot hoot hoot hoothoothoothoothoothoothoot hoooohootohtothotootothtoto, hoot


User-Friendly posted:

I'd normally just be cooking for me, and I'll eat pretty much anything. Unfortunately, I'm closer to "broke" than anything else. Also, the fridge is ridiculously crowded. There's ten of us sharing this kitchen, so it's more or less a constant struggle to find space in there. The reason I mentioned time restriction was on the scale of hours, avoiding making soups and similar projects.

I'm not exactly a cooking regular, so I'm more making recipe requests with such restrictions in mind instead of scaling down already-known recipes.

Can you get a slow cooker?

Nephzinho
Jan 24, 2008



Do we have a soup thread? I'm going to make chicken noodle tomorrow and may document the process to get one started.

Will just be doing celery, carrot, onion, oregano, chicken broth, a small rotisserie chicken, and a box of those short cut noodles. Simple stuff, but it got cold and rainy in the northeast and that sounds like soup to me.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


Jose posted:

What I want to know is if I'd experience this with sushi? Part of why I hate the smell of fish is the smell of it cooking. I have never eaten sushi and decided to wait until I can try some from somewhere high quality. Am I making a mistake here and will just end up wasting money and should try one of those crappy supermarket sushi lunch boxes?

Don't get the stuff from the supermarket. Go to a decent sushi joint, worst case scenario you'll be out like $15. Try tuna, salmon, aaaaaand idk. Unagi (eel). Get sashimi or nigiri. Dip the fish in a little soy sauce, not too much. Use wasabi at your discretion. I hope you enjoy it!

zerox147o posted:

Do we have a soup thread? I'm going to make chicken noodle tomorrow and may document the process to get one started.

Will just be doing celery, carrot, onion, oregano, chicken broth, a small rotisserie chicken, and a box of those short cut noodles. Simple stuff, but it got cold and rainy in the northeast and that sounds like soup to me.

Don't feel compelled to make it into The Soup Thread. It can just as successfully be a well-documented thread about how you make chicken noodle soup.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Kenning posted:

Unagi (eel).



Stop eating eel! She is endangered!

Nephzinho
Jan 24, 2008



Kenning posted:

Don't get the stuff from the supermarket. Go to a decent sushi joint, worst case scenario you'll be out like $15. Try tuna, salmon, aaaaaand idk. Unagi (eel). Get sashimi or nigiri. Dip the fish in a little soy sauce, not too much. Use wasabi at your discretion. I hope you enjoy it!


Don't feel compelled to make it into The Soup Thread. It can just as successfully be a well-documented thread about how you make chicken noodle soup.

But then where will I put butternut squash soup! And cream of potato soup! God I love fall

User-Friendly
Apr 27, 2008

Is There a God? (Pt. 9)


Fig Newton posted:

Okay, so, no stock.

Welp, somebody who's broke and eats pretty much anything could do worse than investigate Indian food as mentioned above. Since fuel is at a premium on the Indian subcontinent, most Indian food tends to cook fast and is mostly a matter of assembly of ingredients, rather than of "using all the burners simultaneously to cook a lot of stuff".

The vegan thread has a lot of good, interesting, different Indian recipes in it.
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3413016

I am a personal fan of Manjula's cooking style.
http://www.youtube.com/user/Manjulaskitchen

Also of Maangchi, which is Korean.
http://www.youtube.com/user/Maangchi

Dunno what kind of Chinese stir-fry you've been doing, but there's more to it than beef and broccoli.
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3401971

I would also browse the GWS Wiki, see what I felt like eating. Not all of it requires reducing a sauce for 5 hours.
http://www.goonswithspoons.com/Welc...ons_With_Spoons

This is fantastic, thanks.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



zerox147o posted:

But then where will I put butternut squash soup! And cream of potato soup! God I love fall

Make one for hearty winter soups and stews if you like! Trying to veer away from the whole megathread format isn't the worst idea.

Vizrt
Oct 1, 2009

Grass grows, birds fly, sun shines, and brotha', I hurt people.


HClChicken posted:

30 minutes in 90 degree weather isn't bad at all. If you put it in a thermos (without icepacks) you shouldn't have to worry about it. As far as lunch. I love making red beans and rice.

Random google gives: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...ipe2/index.html You don't need three meats. Personally I use andouille or tasso (If I can find it). Bring this plus a bottle of tabasco and you have a full meal.

Thanks for the recipe and mentioning a thermos. A lunch bag is pretty much out of the question for me; I don't know why I didn't think of getting a thermos which is perfect for my situation. Now I can probably figure out quite a few things for lunch.

Seaniqua
Mar 12, 2004

UNDEAD

GO BIG DEAD RED


I have a quick sort of trashy cooking question.

So there are these local sandwiches called "Runzas" in the Nebraska area, basically it's spiced ground beef, onion, and cabbage baked into a bread roll, cheese optional. Around these parts, they're sort of considered standard football food because you can get them at the stadium in Lincoln.

I've decided to make my own, but with a twist. I'd like to make "beer brat runzas" using brats, sauerkraut, onion, and probably peppers. I have two questions regarding this idea.

First of all, for the meat. If possible, I'd like to keep the consistency of ground pork without sacrificing the beer flavor.. Should I cook the brats in beer, then cut them up and put them in the dough to bake? Or just fry ground pork in some beer?

My other question is about the sauerkraut. Should I try to dry it out a little bit before adding it in? I'm worried about adding too much moisture to the dough before it bakes. Is this unreasonable?

Here's the trashy recipe I'm basing this on:

Warning: Onion Soup Mix in This Recipe

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Seaniqua posted:

First of all, for the meat. If possible, I'd like to keep the consistency of ground pork without sacrificing the beer flavor.. Should I cook the brats in beer, then cut them up and put them in the dough to bake? Or just fry ground pork in some beer?

Are you comfortable making bread? Would you like to be? You can substitute beer for the water in bread and get a beer-y flavour that way.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007


Kenning posted:

Don't get the stuff from the supermarket. Go to a decent sushi joint, worst case scenario you'll be out like $15. Try tuna, salmon, aaaaaand idk. Unagi (eel). Get sashimi or nigiri. Dip the fish in a little soy sauce, not too much. Use wasabi at your discretion. I hope you enjoy it!


Thanks for the advice, I love horseradish and mustard but haven't eaten wasabi which is similar right?

Knockknees
Dec 21, 2004

sprung out fully formed


So I got sent home sick from work today - but at least I had my CSA pick up to look forward too! But sadly it was all lettuce and cabbage and that is just not what I want right now.

SO I am scrounging around the kitchen trying to figure out what I can make as comfort food for this stupid cold. I think I can make tomato soup. I have never made tomato soup before and a google search is confusing me with too many methods.

Here's what I've got:
2 cans san marzano tomatos, 4 small roma tomatos
lots of garlic
lots of onion
lots of oil
veggie stock
a little fresh basil
various dried herbs and spices
bread?
a... potato?
flour...?
no dairy to be found

Can I make a passable tomato soup with any of that? how?

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CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Knockknees posted:

Here's what I've got:
2 cans san marzano tomatos, 4 small roma tomatos
lots of garlic
lots of onion
lots of oil
veggie stock
a little fresh basil
Add some tomato paste and celery and you're set. Heat your oil, throw in the onion and celery and cook that till fairly soft. Throw in the minced garlic until you smell it strongly. Pour in the diced tomatos and a couple tablespoons of tomato paste. Bring up the liquid content with your veggie stock. Knock it around a bit with your spoon and bring to a gentle boil. Reduce heat to a low simmer and walk away for a few minutes. Come back, stir, walk away again. Toss in a bit of pepper and some sugar - just a little bit. Stir.

20 minutes later or so oh sweet jesus that smells good. Throw in some chopped basil and stir. Let it continue to simmer gently for another little while (ten minutes or less) and you should have some super tasty garlic tomato soup.

Don't skip the sugar, it's going to help balance the flavors. The salt will come from your veggie stock so you shouldn't need to add more.

Oh and the times are completely approximate. The longer you cook it, the more the tomatos will break down and turn into more soup. Just keep stirring. If you have a stick blender, whack it in there to puree some of the tomato chunks. Hell, if you have a blender at all, puree the tomatos right at the start and throw them in.

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