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Damn Bananas
Jun 30, 2007

You humans bore me


I bought a box of broken lasagne noodles at the store for 30 cents today thinking I could figure out something to use them for. Ideas for a bachelor-level beginner? I'm ok throwing it in with a bunch of spaghetti or alfredo sauce, chicken or ground beef, spices, and cheeses, or whatever else I have in the pantry/fridge but I'd rather not run out to the store again for fresh veggies (I have none; I always use maybe a third of one and have to throw it away when it inevitably goes bad 2 days later). Help?

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YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


Knockknees posted:

SO I am scrounging around the kitchen trying to figure out what I can make as comfort food for this stupid cold. I think I can make tomato soup. I have never made tomato soup before and a google search is confusing me with too many methods.

If you have carrots (I know they weren't listed, but carrots are everywhere, right?), shred up some carrots and use that instead of sugar. If not, no biggie, but they're better than a spoonful of sugar any day.

Reserve a quarter cup of tomatoes and some of the basil, and add them right at the end, five minutes before you're done. And after you puree everything for your tomato soup, strain it so it's silky smoove.

E: wrong quote.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



I know there is a thread but seriously, as much onion, garlic and chilli as you can handle. It might only be temporary and you might want comfort food but it'll give you at least an hour of feeling back to normal. They're miracle foods. Hell, just eat a couple of raw chillis and your sinuses will be cleared out

Knockknees
Dec 21, 2004

sprung out fully formed


Thanks for the suggestions guys. Unfortunately out of carrots, but I DO have a stick blender (probably my favorite kitchen purchase ever) and lots of chili. It is simmering on the stove as we speak and I swear just the smell is doing wonders for me!

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Prepare for your nose to leak all over the place

branedotorg
Jun 19, 2009


Jose posted:

Odd question for GWS and please don't hate me for it. I don't eat any fish. I can't stand the smell of it and that gets into the taste so I don't eat it. Having said that, I have tried quite a few different kinds of fish in the last 10 years or so. Shark thigh, self caught trout and salmon. Same gag reaction from all of them.

What I want to know is if I'd experience this with sushi? Part of why I hate the smell of fish is the smell of it cooking. I have never eaten sushi and decided to wait until I can try some from somewhere high quality. Am I making a mistake here and will just end up wasting money and should try one of those crappy supermarket sushi lunch boxes?
I dont enjoy most fish or shell fish. Partly taste but mostly texture. I'll eat it if it's impolite not to but with no pleasure. Oddly i love sashimi, especially firm white fishes.

Hawkgirl
Jun 20, 2003

Jesus Died for Your Songs

I have almost all the ingredients for this recipe http://www.goonswithspoons.com/Oyakodon except dashi. I'm trying to find something to eat tonight and oyakodon sounds good, but will it still taste ok without dashi?

Also, I recall reading that there are different kinds of dashi. If I were to buy one kind of dashi from the Asian market, what should it be? I plan to make things like oyakodon and miso soup with it if that helps.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



branedotorg posted:

I dont enjoy most fish or shell fish. Partly taste but mostly texture. I'll eat it if it's impolite not to but with no pleasure. Oddly i love sashimi, especially firm white fishes.

Well, aside from the smell of mushrooms and fish, texture is the big thing that puts me off any other food. Can't really think of much else other than those. Not a big fan of caugette and aubergine though due to texture.

Go with Christ
Jan 14, 2006

"Teacher,which is the greatest commandment in the Law?" She replied, "Clean your stove with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind."

Hawkgirl posted:

I have almost all the ingredients for this recipe http://www.goonswithspoons.com/Oyakodon except dashi. I'm trying to find something to eat tonight and oyakodon sounds good, but will it still taste ok without dashi?

Also, I recall reading that there are different kinds of dashi. If I were to buy one kind of dashi from the Asian market, what should it be? I plan to make things like oyakodon and miso soup with it if that helps.

Sub chicken broth, you'll be fine.

Hawkgirl
Jun 20, 2003

Jesus Died for Your Songs

That sounds perfect, now instead of "mother and child bowl" it can be "mother and child and distant cousin" bowl.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Again for UK goons, can people help me with recipes for some thai food that isn't standard thai green/red chicken curry? Phad Thai etc. Stuff that is easy and fast to make would be perfect

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


Iron Chef Ricola posted:



Stop eating eel! She is endangered!

Aw gently caress I forgot. But it's so delicious

Jose posted:

Thanks for the advice, I love horseradish and mustard but haven't eaten wasabi which is similar right?

Um, sort of similar. Give it a try at least, I love wasabi. It's like a rollercoaster made of food.

Neko Sou
Jan 24, 2006
Scarved Wonder

Bertrand Hustle posted:

You're on the right track in that you are paying attention to what you're eating. WW just gives you a framework for doing that. That said, I'm not going to trash your diet, if it's working for you, but my guess is that they taste a little bland because they're cutting down all fats and carbs.

Olive oil is good for you. I'm not suggesting you drink it, but if you want to cook something in a couple glugs of olive oil, go for it. Butter is fine in moderation, as is cheese (but generally depends on the cheese). I might catch some flak for this, but some butter substitutes like Smart Balance taste very good. Not regular margarine, I hate the stuff, but SB is a fairly good butter substitute that I use because my dad had high blood pressure and I actually like it. You can't bake with it, but for frying eggs, putting on toast, nearly anything you can use butter for, you can use it in and it tastes good.

I love olive oil, I am Syrian so it's very hard for me to not just throw it into everything. I think I have been relying way too much on things like pasta and cheese. I usually don't eat much pasta (I love it a little too much) so since it's on the diet I've been kind of shoehorning it into all of my food. I have some Palestinian olive oil that's so fruity and beautiful and green, maybe I ought to reconfigure some of my recipes so I can work it back in again. I might make one of my favorite dishes--green beans, tomato, garlic, mint, and olive oil. Simple but delicious!

CuddleChunks posted:


Here are a few recipes I made while learning how things work. It uses the old points system, I haven't recalculated for PointsPlus, sorry.

These look lovely! Thank you! I can recalculate it myself.

Growing up our meals always consisted of lots of rice, and then some combo of meat + veggies so it's been tough eliminating the rice entirely. Even when I have a nice steak I always need something like potatoes or rice alongside it. I love all kinds of veggies though, so it might be time to explore new ways of preparing them.

At any rate, thanks everyone for your advice and kind words. Sorry to turn this into my own personal diet journal

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005



Jose posted:

Again for UK goons, can people help me with recipes for some thai food that isn't standard thai green/red chicken curry? Phad Thai etc. Stuff that is easy and fast to make would be perfect

Pad Thai is super easy. Here's a great guide: http://chezpim.com/cook/pad_thai_for_beginners

To sum it up: Sauce ingredients are vaguely equal parts (taste lots and adjust to suit you) fish sauce, tamarind (or lime juice) and palm sugar (or brown sugar). Add some dried chile powder for a little heat and depth. Combine and heat til ready to use.

Chop your protein of choice, scramble an egg or two, chop lots of scallions, crush peanuts. Cook protein in a wok, add onions, garlic, fry a minute, add eggs and scramble. Add cooked rice noodles and sauce, combine. Top with bean sprouts, chiles, lime juice, peanuts. That's the basic recipe, and super delicious.

Skavoovee
Oct 2, 2006
Super Ska Stravaganza

Does anyone have a good idea for a foie gras replacement? I don't have a specific recipe in mind, I'm just looking for something that isn't liver and can approximate the richness and other characteristics of it.

I tried Googling for this, but haven't been able to find anything.

Thanks.

Cranberry Jam
Apr 8, 2011


Jose posted:

Again for UK goons, can people help me with recipes for some thai food that isn't standard thai green/red chicken curry? Phad Thai etc. Stuff that is easy and fast to make would be perfect

Thai peanut noodles are good both hot and cold.

Hot:
14 oz can coconut milk
1/4 c. peanut butter
1 T. soy sauce
1 T. fish sauce
1 T. rice wine vinegar
1-2 T. curry paste
1 T. palm sugar or brown sugar
1 T. ginger grated
1-2 cloves of garlic grated
chili paste/sauce to taste

Bring coconut milk to a simmer and mix in peanut butter until smooth. Mix in all other ingredients and let simmer for a minute or two.

I do it mostly by taste because it can really depend on what kind of coconut milk, peanut putter and curry paste you use, it may need more peanut butter, curry paste, sugar or soy sauce.

Toss with prepared rice noodles, peanuts, veggies and serve with some lime wedges. I like green onion, english cucumber, red bell pepper and bok choy.

Cool:
1/4 c. soy sauce
1/4 c. peanut putter
1 T rice wine vinegar
1-2 t. curry paste
1 T. ginger grated
1-2 cloves garlic grated
1 t. sesame oil
1-2 t. chili paste/sauce

Blend ingredients in food processor/blender. Toss with prepared rice noodles, peanuts, veggies and serve with some lime wedges.

Thai meat salads (Larb) are good as well. I don't have a recipe, but its something you could look into.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larb

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Skavoovee posted:

Does anyone have a good idea for a foie gras replacement? I don't have a specific recipe in mind, I'm just looking for something that isn't liver and can approximate the richness and other characteristics of it.

I tried Googling for this, but haven't been able to find anything.

Thanks.

sorry, you're SOL. Foie gras is seriously unique, nothing else tastes like it, let alone something not liver... Michel Richard does a "Faux Gras" with chicken liver and a shitton of butter, but it's more of a pate or terrine, I wouldn't go cutting a slab of it for searing off or anything, especially because it's, like, 80% butter.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Right, thanks for the recipes, will give both a go, take some photos and start a Thai food thread unless someone wants to do it for me. My photos will be poo poo iPhone photos

Last Celebration
Mar 30, 2010


I'm thinking about making a brown rice congee in a slow cooker. Does it matter if I use the long grain stuff, and can I put a few smoked turkey tails in there for flavor?

Skavoovee
Oct 2, 2006
Super Ska Stravaganza

GrAviTy84 posted:

sorry, you're SOL. Foie gras is seriously unique, nothing else tastes like it, let alone something not liver... Michel Richard does a "Faux Gras" with chicken liver and a shitton of butter, but it's more of a pate or terrine, I wouldn't go cutting a slab of it for searing off or anything, especially because it's, like, 80% butter.

Yeah, that's basically what I thought, thanks for the response.

bartolimu
Nov 25, 2002



Jose posted:

Right, thanks for the recipes, will give both a go, take some photos and start a Thai food thread unless someone wants to do it for me. My photos will be poo poo iPhone photos

Don't feel like you have to make a definitive Thai thread or anything. We're encouraging less comprehensive, shorter threads these days, and a simple "here are a couple of things I made, give me more ideas and I'll make them too" thread would be quite welcome, Thai or otherwise.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Oh thats all I was going to do, I mean I know pretty much nothing about Thai food outside of Thai curries and Pad Thai

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Skavoovee posted:

Does anyone have a good idea for a foie gras replacement? I don't have a specific recipe in mind, I'm just looking for something that isn't liver and can approximate the richness and other characteristics of it.

I tried Googling for this, but haven't been able to find anything.

Thanks.

A pork and duck fat emulsion would approximate the richness!

Vixenella
Mar 23, 2009


I'm making a cake for my Mother in Laws birthday on Saturday and wanted to try a new recipe. It calls for Root Beer flavouring but I can't find it anywhere, I have 2 places left to try but if I can't find it what should I use?

I have some root beer candies could I just put them in vodka and use that? Will the alcohol cook off, as she doesn't like the taste of alcohol?

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



So another question for people. I don't consider myself a good cook by any stretch of the imagination. I can make very nice food because I can follow a recipe very well and take care to prepare in advance and make sure that I don't have to juggle too much poo poo at once so something may get burned for example.

What I am bad at is coming up with food ideas when I cook (currently living with my parents so less of an issue but it means I get to cook more unusual dishes since they can pay for the more exotic ingredients and I cook for myself based on craving) and basically being able to look at whats in the fridge for example and being able to make something good out of it.

Will this just come with time or is it one of those gifts that true cooks have?

Scientastic
Mar 1, 2010

TRULY scientastic.


It comes with time. Like anything, it's just as much about experience as anything else. The more you cook and the more you learn what goes with what, the greater confidence you'll have in putting things together because you just know they'll work.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Jose posted:

So another question for people. I don't consider myself a good cook by any stretch of the imagination. I can make very nice food because I can follow a recipe very well and take care to prepare in advance and make sure that I don't have to juggle too much poo poo at once so something may get burned for example.

What I am bad at is coming up with food ideas when I cook (currently living with my parents so less of an issue but it means I get to cook more unusual dishes since they can pay for the more exotic ingredients and I cook for myself based on craving) and basically being able to look at whats in the fridge for example and being able to make something good out of it.

Will this just come with time or is it one of those gifts that true cooks have?

The Flavor Bible is really good for figuring out what goes with what, if you want something to get ideas from.

I like turtles
Aug 6, 2009

"Wouldn't want to see an angry turtle with a gun, would ya? "

Well...


What can you guys tell me about Polish food, beyond perogi and sausage? I've got a new restaurant across the street opening soon, "The Polish Cottage", and I want to get some idea of what I'm looking at.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


I like turtles posted:

What can you guys tell me about Polish food, beyond perogi and sausage? I've got a new restaurant across the street opening soon, "The Polish Cottage", and I want to get some idea of what I'm looking at.

What comes to mind first when Polish cuisine is mentioned is vodka.


After that is Bigos. It's a stew of cabbage, sauerkraut, and meat. So hearty and delicious. I make mine usually with a pork shoulder, sauerkraut, white cabbage, smoked kielbasa, a handful of peppercorns, and some caraway, then stewed with some stock and beer until amazing.

Besides that? Uh, I've always enjoyed golumpki, which is cabbage leaves stuffed with meat and veggies and rice and stuff.

Yum.

Fig Newton
Oct 29, 2005



Vixenella posted:

I'm making a cake for my Mother in Laws birthday on Saturday and wanted to try a new recipe. It calls for Root Beer flavouring but I can't find it anywhere, I have 2 places left to try but if I can't find it what should I use?

I have some root beer candies could I just put them in vodka and use that? Will the alcohol cook off, as she doesn't like the taste of alcohol?

A. I would not advise an experiment with adding alcohol to cake batter unless I knew more about what the recipe was. What recipe are you using? Baking is not like cooking; in cooking, you can tinker as you go and have a reasonable expectation that it'll come out okay. Baking, however, is more akin to firing rockets--you put all the carefully measured ingredients together, light a match, and keep your fingers crossed. The proportions of ingredients in cake batter are carefully calibrated to interact with each other in very specific, particular ways, and if you don't have much experience with baking cakes and with substituting things in cake batter, then it's really better, and safer, to stick with the recipe, rather than attempt to go off-road.

B. I'm not sure how much of the artificial root beer flavoring that they use in candies would infuse into the vodka, and I'm not sure whether having artificial-root-beer-flavor-infused vodka is a Good Thing. I'm thinking it might taste more like cheap cough syrup, not a good ingredient to have. Also, the amount of actual root beer flavor in a teaspoon of root beer extract is a lot more than the amount of actual root beer flavor you'd eventually get from a teaspoon of vodka. In order to have a commensurate amount of actual root beer flavor, you'd have to have more vodka, which would mess up your liquids.

C. I would personally never, not ever, make a cake using a new, untried recipe for my mother-in-law, especially for such an important occasion as a birthday. I would especially never, not EVER, take that new, untried recipe and tinker with it. No, she would get a standard cake that was by-the-book and according-to-the-recipe, because that way I'd have a reasonable guarantee that it wouldn't come out an inedible mess. Perhaps your MIL is a saint and would only be highly amused at collecting a hilarious anecdote if her daughter-in-law baked her an inedible mess of a birthday cake; if so, you are fortunate.

D. If your intent is to make a root beer flavored cake, there are other recipes out there for that. Many of them put the crushed root beer candies on top, like sprinkles, on frosting.

E. If you're absolutely determined to make the cake whose recipe you have there in your hand, you might be able to substitute any other flavoring or extract--vanilla, maple, peppermint, etc. It depends on the recipe.

F. Googling around, I see that some Wal-Marts carry root beer extract. Check stores for availability. http://www.walmart.com/ip/Zatarain-...t-4-oz/10293256

Where are you?

Fig Newton fucked around with this message at Sep 21, 2011 around 18:53

Not Very Metal
Aug 3, 2007

Shit Fuck Shit Fuck!

I like turtles posted:

What can you guys tell me about Polish food, beyond perogi and sausage? I've got a new restaurant across the street opening soon, "The Polish Cottage", and I want to get some idea of what I'm looking at.

Will it be Polish owned and operated? This will probably make a huge difference in the quality of the food.

The pierogi and sausage will come in roughly a bazillian different forms - namely fresh and smoked for the sausage, then sweet cheese or not for the pierogi. Their dill pickle soup and czarnina will most likely be scrumptious. Kapusta is a staple - it's essentially a slightly more sweet sauerkraut. Potatoes are huge in Polish cuisine, so there will be a lot of different methods there as well. Also expect great golumpki (as mentioned - stuffed cabbage), and crepes of several varieties.

All of the Polish restaurants around me also do a "Hungarian Pancake," which is a thick potato pancake topped with a heavily paprika'd goulash.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


Jose posted:

So another question for people. I don't consider myself a good cook by any stretch of the imagination. I can make very nice food because I can follow a recipe very well and take care to prepare in advance and make sure that I don't have to juggle too much poo poo at once so something may get burned for example.

What I am bad at is coming up with food ideas when I cook (currently living with my parents so less of an issue but it means I get to cook more unusual dishes since they can pay for the more exotic ingredients and I cook for myself based on craving) and basically being able to look at whats in the fridge for example and being able to make something good out of it.

Will this just come with time or is it one of those gifts that true cooks have?

I was in much the same place you are now a couple years ago. I feel like in the last year I've begun to really get comfortable where I can just toss stuff together and have it taste decent. It really does just take experience, and a willingness to just throw something away if it utterly fail. Luckily that happens very infrequently.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


Fig Newton posted:

A. I would not advise an experiment with adding alcohol to cake batter unless I knew more about what the recipe was. What recipe are you using? Baking is not like cooking; in cooking, you can tinker as you go and have a reasonable expectation that it'll come out okay. Baking, however, is more akin to firing rockets--you put all the carefully measured ingredients together, light a match, and keep your fingers crossed. The proportions of ingredients in cake batter are carefully calibrated to interact with each other in very specific, particular ways, and if you don't have much experience with baking cakes and with substituting things in cake batter, then it's really better, and safer, to stick with the recipe, rather than attempt to go off-road.

B. I'm not sure how much of the artificial root beer flavoring that they use in candies would infuse into the vodka, and I'm not sure whether having artificial-root-beer-flavor-infused vodka is a Good Thing. I'm thinking it might taste more like cheap cough syrup, not a good ingredient to have. Also, the amount of actual root beer flavor in a teaspoon of root beer extract is a lot more than the amount of actual root beer flavor you'd eventually get from a teaspoon of vodka. In order to have a commensurate amount of actual root beer flavor, you'd have to have more vodka, which would mess up your liquids.


E. If you're absolutely determined to make the cake whose recipe you have there in your hand, you might be able to substitute any other flavoring or extract--vanilla, maple, peppermint, etc. It depends on the recipe.


Do you know how vanilla extract is made?

Edit: But yeah, don't do an untried recipe for an in-law.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Ricola-kun, tell me
about pizza cones!


Fig Newton posted:

A. I would not advise an experiment with adding alcohol to cake batter unless I knew more about what the recipe was. What recipe are you using? Baking is not like cooking; in cooking, you can tinker as you go and have a reasonable expectation that it'll come out okay. Baking, however, is more akin to firing rockets--you put all the carefully measured ingredients together, light a match, and keep your fingers crossed. The proportions of ingredients in cake batter are carefully calibrated to interact with each other in very specific, particular ways, and if you don't have much experience with baking cakes and with substituting things in cake batter, then it's really better, and safer, to stick with the recipe, rather than attempt to go off-road.

B. I'm not sure how much of the artificial root beer flavoring that they use in candies would infuse into the vodka, and I'm not sure whether having artificial-root-beer-flavor-infused vodka is a Good Thing. I'm thinking it might taste more like cheap cough syrup, not a good ingredient to have. Also, the amount of actual root beer flavor in a teaspoon of root beer extract is a lot more than the amount of actual root beer flavor you'd eventually get from a teaspoon of vodka. In order to have a commensurate amount of actual root beer flavor, you'd have to have more vodka, which would mess up your liquids.

C. I would personally never, not ever, make a cake using a new, untried recipe for my mother-in-law, especially for such an important occasion as a birthday. I would especially never, not EVER, take that new, untried recipe and tinker with it. No, she would get a standard cake that was by-the-book and according-to-the-recipe, because that way I'd have a reasonable guarantee that it wouldn't come out an inedible mess. Perhaps your MIL is a saint and would only be highly amused at collecting a hilarious anecdote if her daughter-in-law baked her an inedible mess of a birthday cake; if so, you are fortunate.

D. If your intent is to make a root beer flavored cake, there are other recipes out there for that. Many of them put the crushed root beer candies on top, like sprinkles, on frosting.

E. If you're absolutely determined to make the cake whose recipe you have there in your hand, you might be able to substitute any other flavoring or extract--vanilla, maple, peppermint, etc. It depends on the recipe.

F. Googling around, I see that some Wal-Marts carry root beer extract. Check stores for availability. http://www.walmart.com/ip/Zatarain-...t-4-oz/10293256


Where are you?

Oh god yes never try something new for an in-law.

For content's sake though, small amounts of alcohol is fine. What do you think your vanilla extract is?

Charmmi
Dec 8, 2008

:trophystare:


Vixenella posted:

I'm making a cake for my Mother in Laws birthday on Saturday and wanted to try a new recipe. It calls for Root Beer flavouring but I can't find it anywhere, I have 2 places left to try but if I can't find it what should I use?

I have some root beer candies could I just put them in vodka and use that? Will the alcohol cook off, as she doesn't like the taste of alcohol?

Can you give us the link to the recipe or maybe post it here?

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Fig Newton posted:

C. I would personally never, not ever, make a cake using a new, untried recipe for my mother-in-law, especially for such an important occasion as a birthday. I would especially never, not EVER, take that new, untried recipe and tinker with it. No, she would get a standard cake that was by-the-book and according-to-the-recipe, because that way I'd have a reasonable guarantee that it wouldn't come out an inedible mess. Perhaps your MIL is a saint and would only be highly amused at collecting a hilarious anecdote if her daughter-in-law baked her an inedible mess of a birthday cake; if so, you are fortunate.


Who would freak out at someone who was adventurous and made a cake that turned out ridiculously in some way? Maybe my family just has Stockholm syndrome from consuming my food misadventures, but half the fun is doing something interesting.

I like turtles
Aug 6, 2009

"Wouldn't want to see an angry turtle with a gun, would ya? "

Well...


Not Very Metal posted:

Will it be Polish owned and operated? This will probably make a huge difference in the quality of the food.

The pierogi and sausage will come in roughly a bazillian different forms - namely fresh and smoked for the sausage, then sweet cheese or not for the pierogi. Their dill pickle soup and czarnina will most likely be scrumptious. Kapusta is a staple - it's essentially a slightly more sweet sauerkraut. Potatoes are huge in Polish cuisine, so there will be a lot of different methods there as well. Also expect great golumpki (as mentioned - stuffed cabbage), and crepes of several varieties.

All of the Polish restaurants around me also do a "Hungarian Pancake," which is a thick potato pancake topped with a heavily paprika'd goulash.
I was driving by a week ago and saw some folks inside doing work. I turned in to chat with them and they both had pretty heavy accents.
The name on the liquor license application I see online is Monika Glowacka-Musial, which sounds pretty Polish to me.

I have high hopes, Tucson has been sorely lacking in central/eastern European food for the last few years, and good central/eastern European food for quite a bit longer than that.

Fuzzy Pipe Wrench
Nov 5, 2008

MAYBE DON'T STEAL BEER FROM GOONS?

CHEERS!
(FUCK YOU)


Any ideas what to do with ~2.3 pounds of pork top loin? I've tried slow cooking it, and braising it, but both of those it didn't have enough fat content to remain moist. Oven baked with a heavy seasoning rub worked out nicely, but there was very little flavor penetration towards the center of the meat.

Fig Newton
Oct 29, 2005



Casu Marzu posted:

Do you know how vanilla extract is made?


mediaphage posted:


For content's sake though, small amounts of alcohol is fine. What do you think your vanilla extract is?

Well, it wasn't clear from her post whether she was talking about using a teaspoon of the resultant vodka, or a cupful, or what. Asking about the alcohol "cooking off" made me wonder how much she was planning on using, hence my caution. I couldn't tell whether she was an experienced baker, or just somebody who got the recipe for the Root Beer Float Cake off the Internet and wanted to use 1-1/4 cups of vodka instead of the half-can of root beer. I'm not sure whether you can substitute vodka for the water 1-1 in a Betty Crocker cake mix.

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Fig Newton
Oct 29, 2005



Iron Chef Ricola posted:

Who would freak out at someone who was adventurous and made a cake that turned out ridiculously in some way? Maybe my family just has Stockholm syndrome from consuming my food misadventures, but half the fun is doing something interesting.

You don't want to have my sister-in-law, who would snigger behind my back literally until her dying day if I made her a cake, for any reason, that turned out less than perfect. "Wow, that Fig, she sure thought she could bake! And was it ever crappy!"

My mother-in-law would be perfectly polite about the lapsed cake, but she'd make vaguely negative, passive-aggressive comments about my cake-baking skilz ever after, too.

Yes, I am blessed by my in-laws, why do you ask?

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