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Dane
Jun 18, 2003

mmm... creamy.


Junior G-man posted:

How do I prevent my nonstick pans from 'popping' in the middle; forming a well or a hill in the middle? I know you don't put them from the flame straight into the water, but it still happens.

Do I need to heat them slowly slowly the first time to "temper" them or what am I doing wrong

And make sure that your burner and pan size correspond sortakinda. Best way to warp a pan besides going from redhot to icy water is heating a large pan on a small burner/coil (generally not an issue cooking on gas).

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Mozi
Apr 4, 2004

The door blew shut but here's the deal
Dreams are lies, it's the dreaming that's real


Nap Ghost

edit: taking this to the product recommendation thread

Mozi fucked around with this message at Sep 22, 2011 around 19:29

Mach420
Jun 22, 2002
Bandit at 6 'o clock - Pull my finger

Junior G-man posted:

How do I prevent my nonstick pans from 'popping' in the middle; forming a well or a hill in the middle? I know you don't put them from the flame straight into the water, but it still happens.

Do I need to heat them slowly slowly the first time to "temper" them or what am I doing wrong

I've had a very nice Tefal frying pan warp. Don't overheat it by trying to do higher heat stuff on it. Stick to a thick bottomed pan for that sort of stuff.

xarg
Sep 17, 2008

IF A MAN DRINK LIKE THAT AND HE DONT EAT HE IS GOING TO DIE

Thanks to everyone who tried to help! Looks like I have plenty of experimentation to try with my new toy. I did go hunting for a slow cooker thread, I guess I didn't look hard enough.

bartolimu
Nov 25, 2002



It's in the Goldmine. Here: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=2775050

Zuhzuhzombie!!
Apr 17, 2008
FACTS ARE A CONSPIRACY BY THE CAPITALIST OPRESSOR

Anyone got a good creole rice or jambalaya recipe to share?

AllTerrineVehicle
Jan 8, 2010

I'm great at boats!


Zuhzuhzombie!! posted:

Anyone got a good creole rice or jambalaya recipe to share?

I've made this before with pretty good success. In one of the old newbie threads someone posted a replacement for the spice blend used in the recipe. I have it at home and can post it when I get back if you'd like.

Zuhzuhzombie!!
Apr 17, 2008
FACTS ARE A CONSPIRACY BY THE CAPITALIST OPRESSOR

Sure!

Thinkin this or the simple pulled pork crock pot recipe, TBH.

The Heavenator
Feb 27, 2011

BangBangBang! Commando of the Galaxy


So any recommendations for good very spicy chili recipe? I've had a recipe for a while and have never been quite pleased with it. This will probably be cooking in a crockpot if that makes any difference.

Bean
Sep 9, 2001


Our farmer's market sells frozen meat. It is delicious, but there's only two of us. Is there a way to reportion and store the meat in the refrigerator without using power tools? I know better than to thaw the meat all the way and refreeze, but I've had some luck with just barely thawing it and then hacking at it with a chef's knife.

No idea what the hell to do with our pork shoulder, though. Our crock pot won't hold that fucker, there has to be a way to cut it.

Psychobabble
Jan 17, 2006


Bean posted:

Our farmer's market sells frozen meat. It is delicious, but there's only two of us. Is there a way to reportion and store the meat in the refrigerator without using power tools? I know better than to thaw the meat all the way and refreeze, but I've had some luck with just barely thawing it and then hacking at it with a chef's knife.

No idea what the hell to do with our pork shoulder, though. Our crock pot won't hold that fucker, there has to be a way to cut it.

The best option is to just tell whoever you are buying it from the way you would like to purchase it and they can do it for you before it gets frozen.

wafflesnsegways
Jan 12, 2008
And that's why I was forced to surgically attach your hands to your face.

OK, I just ordered a pound of vanilla beans. Coming up, I'm making vanilla extract, vanilla ice cream, vanilla sugar, and brewing a vanilla porter. So that should use up about 1/10 of the beans in a pound. What else should I do?

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Pot du creme, creme brulee, sabayon, pastry cream, pudding, cheese cake, pound cake, chiffon cake, ice cream cake, mousse, french toast, cookies, clafouti.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Cooking a steak tonight with home made spiced wedges. Thinking I might like a sauce but not sure, something thick for the steak. The wedges are currently in the oven after being boiled. Any quick recommendations? I'm happy to have the steak solo obviously

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Jose posted:

Cooking a steak tonight with home made spiced wedges. Thinking I might like a sauce but not sure, something thick for the steak. The wedges are currently in the oven after being boiled. Any quick recommendations? I'm happy to have the steak solo obviously

Sauce Bearnaise.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Decided to just fry some onions in the fat rended out of the steak.

Finally managed to get steak perfect. Trick is definitely to use steak at least an inch thick

Jose fucked around with this message at Sep 23, 2011 around 20:00

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Always a good choice.

CzarChasm
Mar 14, 2009

Blah Blah Blah
Look at me
I'm the Goddamn Batman
Blah Blah Blah


wafflesnsegways posted:

OK, I just ordered a pound of vanilla beans. Coming up, I'm making vanilla extract, vanilla ice cream, vanilla sugar, and brewing a vanilla porter. So that should use up about 1/10 of the beans in a pound. What else should I do?

In addition to Casu Marzu's list: Vanilla Sugar

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Added a little beef dripping to the pan before I sat it on the side of fat for frying. No idea if it made any difference

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

wafflesnsegways posted:

OK, I just ordered a pound of vanilla beans. Coming up, I'm making vanilla extract, vanilla ice cream, vanilla sugar, and brewing a vanilla porter. So that should use up about 1/10 of the beans in a pound. What else should I do?



CzarChasm posted:

In addition to Casu Marzu's list: Vanilla Sugar

'Sup.

CzarChasm
Mar 14, 2009

Blah Blah Blah
Look at me
I'm the Goddamn Batman
Blah Blah Blah


Flash Gordon Ramsay posted:

'Sup.

Just one of those days.

wafflesnsegways
Jan 12, 2008
And that's why I was forced to surgically attach your hands to your face.

I was gonna be polite and not say anything.

I just got an email from the vanilla bean people saying that they're throwing in a quarter pound of tahitian vanilla beans for free, so I will be very rich in vanilla next week. In the spirit of the new GWS, I'll try to document what I make and throw up a thread.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

wafflesnsegways posted:

I was gonna be polite and not say anything.

I just got an email from the vanilla bean people saying that they're throwing in a quarter pound of tahitian vanilla beans for free, so I will be very rich in vanilla next week. In the spirit of the new GWS, I'll try to document what I make and throw up a thread.

Tahitian beans are good for savory dishes. They tend to have more floral notes. Poach lobster tails in butter with a tahitian bean and thank me later.

HClChicken
Aug 15, 2005

Highly trained by the US military at expedient semen processing.


Joborgzorz posted:

I've made this before with pretty good success. In one of the old newbie threads someone posted a replacement for the spice blend used in the recipe. I have it at home and can post it when I get back if you'd like.

http://216.86.148.111/showthread.ph...0#post387024087

I have it bookmarked because godamn is it a good jambalaya.

Randomity
Feb 25, 2007

Careful what you wish,
You may regret it!


One of my best friends from high school is divorcing her high school sweetheart and I'd like to have her over for a nice dinner since we haven't really hung out much lately. I'd like to do something that is impressive but not too much work, if possible. The only dietary restriction is she recently lost a whole lot of weight counting calories (is this a GWS-approved method of weight loss?) so no calorie bombs, please.

One thing I have that the average person may not have is a Sous Vide Supreme Demi, if that helps. Also my oven is tiny and only has one rack, but I have a four burner electric stove. As of right now I keep thinking pork but that's as far as my brain will take me. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Shroomie
Jul 31, 2008



Bacon grease: Keep it in the fridge or no? Strain it or leave the bacon bits in?

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

Strained and in the fridge. It will keep the longest this way.

vvvv Wisdom

Flash Gordon Ramsay fucked around with this message at Sep 23, 2011 around 23:55

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Flash Gordon Ramsay posted:

Strained and in the fridge. It will keep the longest this way.

Make sure to keep it in a covered container. That way it won't pick up any nasty odors from other stuff in your fridge nor contribute a greasy, bacony stench to your fridge.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

Couldn't hurt to keep it on an opaque container, either. Light, heat and oxygen all contribute to rancidity.

That said, bacon fat keeps a long time anyway.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



So, I love spicy food. Indian, what Mexican I've had, what Thai I've had. What other countries is spicy food a standard thing?

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Jose posted:

So, I love spicy food. Indian, what Mexican I've had, what Thai I've had. What other countries is spicy food a standard thing?

Korean.

branedotorg
Jun 19, 2009


Jose posted:

So, I love spicy food. Indian, what Mexican I've had, what Thai I've had. What other countries is spicy food a standard thing?

Sichuan & Hunan in china, most of south east asia.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



Casu Marzu posted:

Korean.

Got any easy recipes I can do? or just names or stuff that I can search for online? That would be awesome.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Jose posted:

So, I love spicy food. Indian, what Mexican I've had, what Thai I've had. What other countries is spicy food a standard thing?

Jamaican jerk chicken is pretty easy to make and tastes great. When you start grinding up all the habaneros into the jerk marinade... It's magical. For Mexican, focus on specific regions like Puebla and Oaxaca, not just generic "Tex Mex", and learn when and how to use fresh versus dried peppers, and you can start making your own salsas and mole sauces and other stuff. The cookbooks written by Rick Bayless are great for this.

The other thing is to learn how to use peppers in everyday dishes. Adding orange peel, cilantro, and sliced jalapeņos to homemade cranberry sauce means that you'll never have a bland Thanksgiving again.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Jose posted:

Got any easy recipes I can do? or just names or stuff that I can search for online? That would be awesome.

Bulgogi with a good dollop of ssamjang and a side of kimchi is pretty traditional and delicious. Got a nice kick to it too.

Bibimbap is a mixed rice bowl full of veggies and meat and rice with ssamjang again. It's awesome and easy to do.

Uh, my favorite spicy Korean food is kimchi jjigae. It's a stew of tofu, veggies, pork or seafood, and a lot of really fermented kimchi, seasoned with ssamjang.

HookShot
Dec 26, 2005



Randomity posted:

One of my best friends from high school is divorcing her high school sweetheart and I'd like to have her over for a nice dinner since we haven't really hung out much lately. I'd like to do something that is impressive but not too much work, if possible. The only dietary restriction is she recently lost a whole lot of weight counting calories (is this a GWS-approved method of weight loss?) so no calorie bombs, please.

One thing I have that the average person may not have is a Sous Vide Supreme Demi, if that helps. Also my oven is tiny and only has one rack, but I have a four burner electric stove. As of right now I keep thinking pork but that's as far as my brain will take me. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

One good way to cater to people doing calorie counting diets is to have a nice, fresh salad (optionally with low calorie/low fat salad dressing) as a side to the main meal.

My go-to one is iceberg lettuce, tomatoes, cucumber, green pepper and shredded carrots, but for something nice you can always do something a little bit fancier like a couscous salad, mango salad, watermelon and basil, etc.

Also calorie counting is a great way to lose weight. As long as you're taking in less calories (energy) than you're losing during the day, you'll definitely lose weight. Most good diets recommend a deficiency of around 500 calories per day (meaning if you're using 2000 calories a day, eat 1500), and since there are 3500 calories per pound, this results in one pound of weight loss each week.

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

Fun Shoe

Me and the girlfriend went out to an Italian restaurant near Marietta, GA tonight. Before we went, I made fun of all of the people who wanted the 'white and red sauce mixed together' on their generic pasta dish using a really bad deep south accent.

At the restaurant, the special included a "rosatella" sauce, which turned out to be Alfredo sauce mixed with Marinara. In disbelief, I looked it up when I got home and only found results within the north Georgia area.

Here is the menu where we found it, under 'Cannelloni Genovese' near the bottom: http://www.scalinis.com/Spaghetti%20Classica.htm

Google searching Rosatella sauce turned up results in Kennesaw, GA, Canton, GA and Marietta, GA. Is this actually an Italian thing or am I right for making fun of it?

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Stalizard posted:

Google searching Rosatella sauce turned up results in Kennesaw, GA, Canton, GA and Marietta, GA. Is this actually an Italian thing or am I right for making fun of it?

I'm not Italian but I speak a bit and have been there. First off, I have no answer for your question. If it tastes good, enjoy it. If you don't like it, let it slide. It's far less of a blasphemy than the Italian Nachos I saw on a menu once: fried pasta chips smothered in marinara and sausage and mozzarella.

So what is rosatella? Hell if I know, but keep this in mind:

1) Italian-American cuisine is a whole separate tradition than traditional Italian. It's mostly based on Naples/Sicily kind of stuff and was heavily influenced by the 30s-70s desire for casseroles and big gloopy meals. This is not a criticism, because most of us grew up on this stuff and it can be seriously awesome when prepared well with quality ingredients and some love.

2) "Italian food" is a bad name. If you think New York and Chicago argue over their pizza, imagine that two towns five miles apart hate each other based on the proper way to cook eggplant. Now imagine that within those two towns, every family argues with each other (and internally) about how to cook eggplant. Some of my favorites--stuffed crepes (crespelle), all sorts of crazy little whole fishes (fritto misto), and baby octopus flash cooked with pasta and capers (can't remember), don't show up on American menus. I've got a Pugliese restaurant here in Memphis that has great stuff like whole branzino and sides of roasted chioggia raddicchio and handmade orecchiette in brown butter. And people bitch about it all the time because they don't have that normal eye-talian food.

3) Traditional pasta alfredo is really a much lighter and delicious preparation than the bechamel and cheese gloop that we have here in the States. Best I ever had involved a 50 lb wheel of Parmigiano Reggiano that had been hollowed out into a bowl. You pour some brandy in the bowl and then light it on fire. Then you toss in the freshly boiled noodles, and then some cream, and some sea salt and a bit of parsley. As you swirl it around in the cheese wheel, it grabs the freshly melted cheese from the walls and the sauce is built like that. Damnit, I'm getting hungry.

Drink and Fight
Feb 2, 2003

hoot, hoot, hoot, hoot hoot hoot hoot hoothoothoothoothoothoothoot hoooohootohtothotootothtoto, hoot


benito posted:

Best I ever had involved a 50 lb wheel of Parmigiano Reggiano that had been hollowed out into a bowl. You pour some brandy in the bowl and then light it on fire. Then you toss in the freshly boiled noodles, and then some cream, and some sea salt and a bit of parsley. As you swirl it around in the cheese wheel, it grabs the freshly melted cheese from the walls and the sauce is built like that. Damnit, I'm getting hungry.

I want to go to there.

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Zedlic
Mar 10, 2005

Ask me about being too much of a sperging idiot to understand what resisting arrest means.

The Heavenator posted:

So any recommendations for good very spicy chili recipe? I've had a recipe for a while and have never been quite pleased with it. This will probably be cooking in a crockpot if that makes any difference.

My recipe is a variation of the OP's recipe here: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3261214. It's amazing. Has made me known for chili-making at my school.

With a decent variation of chiles like arbol, ancho, guajillo, chipotle, jalapeno and habanero you should get a flavorful yet spicy chili. You can increase spiciness with more habaneros and/or whatever good hot sauce you have around.

And to think only two years ago I thought "chili powder" was just one specific thing.

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