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eviltastic
Feb 8, 2004

He pities you for your sins, but penance must be done.




Fan of Britches

internet celebrity posted:

Is there a good straightforward guide anywhere for making unpasteurized fruit mead with fresh fruit? I'm looking for something that tells me when/why to use campden, pectic enzyme, and all that other stuff.

This document, starting at page 80.

For a melomel (fruit mead) they differ a bit from Schramm's approach for reasons they explain. They talk about adding pectinase at the end if clarification is needed, but I'd go ahead and just add it in at the start (as I think is mentioned elsewhere in that document).

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digitalhifi
Jun 5, 2004
In life I have encountered much, but nothing as profound as the statement "all we ever do is do stuff."



Ice concentrating my Imperial Oktoberfest (basically a doppelbock), calling it "Icetoberfest."

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

So this morning I'm stumbling around my kitchen half awake getting ready to pitch the yeast for yesterday's brew of a Belgian Red, and my dumb rear end opens the top of the smack pack before I, you know, smack the pack.

So anyway I cut open the nutrient packet inside and poured it into the yeast, mixed it up, and let it sit for about 45 minutes before I had to leave for work and I pitched it into the wort. Here's to hoping!

lifts cats over head
Jan 17, 2003

Antagonist: A bad man who drops things from the windows.

Anyone here make any of the White House beers? I've been curious about them ever since the recipes were published a few months back and I was thinking about getting a clone kit to use as my second homebrew.

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'


College Slice

lifts cats over head posted:

Anyone here make any of the White House beers? I've been curious about them ever since the recipes were published a few months back and I was thinking about getting a clone kit to use as my second homebrew.

I had the honey ale at an election results party hosted by the Alamo Drafthouse and it was delicious. I was planning on making it for my next batch, before my little incident. It would be great for a refreshing summer beer.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007


Mr. Wiggles posted:

So this morning I'm stumbling around my kitchen half awake getting ready to pitch the yeast for yesterday's brew of a Belgian Red, and my dumb rear end opens the top of the smack pack before I, you know, smack the pack.

So anyway I cut open the nutrient packet inside and poured it into the yeast, mixed it up, and let it sit for about 45 minutes before I had to leave for work and I pitched it into the wort. Here's to hoping!

Shouldn't be a giant problem from what I understand about the nutrients in the pack. It will rouse the yeast so maybe take care of a couple hours of lag but there isn't really enough of anything to do something important like begin multiplication.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

*BEEP*
*BOOP*
M'SPREADSHEET



Exciting Lemon

lifts cats over head posted:

Anyone here make any of the White House beers? I've been curious about them ever since the recipes were published a few months back and I was thinking about getting a clone kit to use as my second homebrew.

Northern Brewer's WH Honey Ale and Honey Porter kits were the first beers I ever brewed (thanks Splizwarf!). Of the two I would say the Ale was definitely my favorite. Incredibly drinkable, very smooth, and all of the flavors melded well together.

My wife's uncle is a huge beer far, but most of my beers have been relatively anemic compared to what he likes. He's a huge fan of IPAs and stouts. Can you guys recommend a good hoppy beer that might be fun to brew?

Actually while I'm at it I might as well discuss the summer plan. As part of her grandparent's anniversary my wife's family (about 20 of them) are taking over a beach house for a couple weeks. I plan on supplying the beer, so I was thinking about what brews to make. One thing we were thinking was making a Summer Shandy, similar to Leinenkugel's, and possibly another summer beer like a cream ale or the honey ale. The third one was going to be something a bit more robust. Any suggestions? Particularly for making the summer shandy?

EDIT: After some additional research it looks like the summer shandy is just beer mixed with sparking citrus soda like lemonade. So I suppose I won't have to actually brew that, just make a light lager and bring along a lot of carbonated lemonated. Easily done.

Beer4TheBeerGod fucked around with this message at Jan 14, 2013 around 19:35

Marshmallow Blue
Apr 25, 2010


Why not try to make you own lemony / orangey citrus ale and have it carbonate with your beer? Then again whenever someone says "Oh dude you should make like a strawberry beer!!!", I get kind of grossed out from imagining the combination.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

*BEEP*
*BOOP*
M'SPREADSHEET



Exciting Lemon

Marshmallow Blue posted:

Why not try to make you own lemony / orangey citrus ale and have it carbonate with your beer? Then again whenever someone says "Oh dude you should make like a strawberry beer!!!", I get kind of grossed out from imagining the combination.

Yeah I haven't had a lot of personal enjoyment from fruity beers. I want to say it was some kind of Sam Adam's cherry creation that really grossed me out. But then again I've been thinking it might be worth adding a bit of lemon to the honey ale recipe; I know that honey and lemon go well together in other recipes and perhaps it would turn out well.

Is it hard to do subscale batches? If I wanted to make a half batch of honey ale would I just cut the recipe in half and keep the boil times for the same length?

fullroundaction
Apr 20, 2007

Drink beer every day


We do a lot of fun non-beer 1 gallon experiments which are usually a hit among our non-beer-loving friends & family. Also I hate to waste yeastcake so I'm always scrambling after bottling day to ferment SOMETHING with what's leftover.

Hard iced tea, hard lemonade, hard gingerale ... all 3-4 ingredients each and take about a half hour total to get everything set and fermenting (and the ingredients are cheap as hell).

Plus people who already thought you were super cool for being able to make beer lose their minds when you tell them you have HARD ICED TEA AND HARD LEMONADE TOO. It's like magical.

Edit: Make hard gingerale, it's amazing. (sugar/fresh squeezed lemon/fresh grated ginger -> boil for 10-15 minutes -> "dryhop" with more fresh grated ginger depending on how spicy you like it about a week later)

2Edit: We use german rock sugar (stuff from Teavana) in addition to table sugar to give it a darker, more authentic gingerale color.

fullroundaction fucked around with this message at Jan 14, 2013 around 20:13

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

*BEEP*
*BOOP*
M'SPREADSHEET



Exciting Lemon

Man I'm going to be the booze baron this summer. I wonder if we'll have room for clothes with all the alcohol we'll be bringing.

CapnBry
Jul 15, 2002

I got this goin'

Grimey Drawer

lifts cats over head posted:

Anyone here make any of the White House beers? I've been curious about them ever since the recipes were published a few months back and I was thinking about getting a clone kit to use as my second homebrew.
I made an all-grain version of the Honey Porter and thought it was great. It had a mild hoppiness and a light flavor with a bit of chocolate. I would have preferred it a bit more malty and sweet because when you think honey you think sweet. Still, it went blew pretty quickly once I put it on tap and it was even well regarded by people who generally prefer less flavorful beers so it must be pretty good.

Switching gears, what's the wording on the law regarding how much homebrew you can make in a year (Florida)?

I've made 6x 5.5 gallon batches in 8 weeks and just got a new fermenting chamber so I can step it up to 8-10 gallons a batch. I'm legally restricted to 100 gallons, but I'll be giving out 1-2 gallons in bottles to my assistants. We were joking about what part of the brewing process is technically "brewing"? If a friend comes over and makes a batch in my Saccharomyces Sampo, does that count toward his 100 gallons or is it mine because it was made on my premises? What if he takes the fermenter home and pitches the yeast at his house? What if I give away all the beer I make?

I know that nobody will ever get arrested for brewing a little extra than they should but I am just curious how it works. I'm sure if you do get arrested, the punishment is some arcane prohibition-era punishment like I have to break rocks in prison and then be publicly shamed or put in stocks.

fullroundaction
Apr 20, 2007

Drink beer every day


Florida:

(a) Not in excess of 200 gallons per calendar year if there are two persons over the age of 21 in the household.
(b) Not in excess of 100 gallons per calendar year if there is only one person over the age of 21 in the household.
Any personal or family production of beer in excess of the above amounts or any sale of such alcoholic beverage constitutes a violation of the beverage law.

http://www.homebrewersassociation.o...ffairs/statutes

Other than Alabama it's pretty much the same in every state I've checked.

Marshmallow Blue
Apr 25, 2010


Beer4TheBeerGod posted:

Yeah I haven't had a lot of personal enjoyment from fruity beers. I want to say it was some kind of Sam Adam's cherry creation that really grossed me out. But then again I've been thinking it might be worth adding a bit of lemon to the honey ale recipe; I know that honey and lemon go well together in other recipes and perhaps it would turn out well.

I went on a Sam Adams Cherry wheat kick one month and have not been enthused since. The Sam Adams Blackberry is good though.
---

The 200 Gallon thing is also in Massachusetts. I find it hard to imagine (barring alcoholics) any one couple drinking more than 700 bottles of wine in any given year.
I also just realized... Who's going to stop you from making more than 200 gallons? You destroy the evidence when you drink it. No beverage control officer has banged on my door to punch the amount of gallons on my gallons produced card recently.

PoopShipDestroyer
Jan 13, 2006

I think he's ready for a chair

CapnBry posted:



I know that nobody will ever get arrested for brewing a little extra than they should but I am just curious how it works. I'm sure if you do get arrested, the punishment is some arcane prohibition-era punishment like I have to break rocks in prison and then be publicly shamed or put in stocks.

If that episode of the Simpsons is any indication, they'll fire you out of town with a catapult.

Zhent
Oct 18, 2011

The difference between gods and daemons largely depends upon where one is standing at the time.


Bottled the beer that we made on Christmas day this past Saturday. Next time we do this we are going to be testing the specific gravity before and after, so we know what we're looking at - otherwise we're just kind of guessing. Live and learn.


Marshmallow Blue posted:

The 200 Gallon thing is also in Massachusetts. I find it hard to imagine (barring alcoholics) any one couple drinking more than 700 bottles of wine in any given year.
I also just realized... Who's going to stop you from making more than 200 gallons? You destroy the evidence when you drink it. No beverage control officer has banged on my door to punch the amount of gallons on my gallons produced card recently.

Where in MA do you go locally for supplies, if any? I'm in Medford and trying to find somewhere other than Amazon to pick up another brew kit for the Northern Brewer setup that I got.

Marshmallow Blue
Apr 25, 2010


Zhent posted:

Bottled the beer that we made on Christmas day this past Saturday. Next time we do this we are going to be testing the specific gravity before and after, so we know what we're looking at - otherwise we're just kind of guessing. Live and learn.


Where in MA do you go locally for supplies, if any? I'm in Medford and trying to find somewhere other than Amazon to pick up another brew kit for the Northern Brewer setup that I got.

I'm in Allston MA. I have gone to a few different places.

To the north in Beverly I have gone to "Boston Brewin" on Cabot Street in Beverly (It looks like a regular hobby shop on the outside so its very confusing but the home brew stuff is in the back) They dont have too much more than your basics. Carboys, bungs stoppers, yeasts, a few all grain selections but nothing major. A good place to stop after you go pick your own fruits at Russel Orchards and get inspired and need to grab some stuff.

There is also Modern Home brew Emporium on Cambridge St. near Davis Square. They have a few kit things( not sure if its Northern brewer) and just about anything you'll need from more all grain selections to bottling equipment.

Lastly and furthest away is Strange Brew in Marlboro MA. Its a very big store as far as home brew stores typically go but the shelves are sparse due to the square footage but they have the biggest selection of just about everything and even have my hard to find Mr. beer kits (However I wont be using them anymore cause I'm taking off my brewing diapers and going to all grain). But all their stuff is a little more expensive then you can find elsewhere.

Angry Grimace
Jul 29, 2010

ACTUALLY IT IS VERY GOOD THAT THE SHOW IS BAD AND ANYONE WHO DOESN'T REALIZE WHY THAT'S GOOD IS AN IDIOT. JUST ENJOY THE BAD SHOW INSTEAD OF THINKING.


I'm still dry hopping my clone of KR Citra and I'm starting to get the impression this kind of dry hop regimen is kind of bullshit.

It's a 12 day dry hop with staggered additions every three days and all of the hop additions are like an ounce or more.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Marshmallow Blue posted:

There is also Modern Home brew Emporium on Cambridge St. near Davis Square. They have a few kit things( not sure if its Northern brewer) and just about anything you'll need from more all grain selections to bottling equipment.

Haha. Right before I moved away from Boston, I bought my first ever recipe kit from those guys Don't remember much about the shop since this was going on 5 years ago, but I do recall that the guys in the store were typical homebrew spergs who would gladly talk your ear off all day if you let them (which I appreciated since I had no goddam idea what I was doing). They were even patient when I called them in a panic a week later cause my fermenter never started bubbling. Yup, you guessed it, there was a poor seal on the bucket lid and gas leaked out there instead of bubbling the airlock; everything was fine.

Marshmallow Blue
Apr 25, 2010


If I had to describe it. I would say it's closest to a clown car, because they have everything in such a small space. You just ask and it's in some crazy place, but its all there. I wouldn't be surprised if they had a time machine in the back.

Modern was the first home brew store I had ever been in and I was pretty intimidating. But the staff is definitely friendly and I learned all I could ever need to know about bottle cappers.

Also I've got a mead idea to run by you folks. What do you think?
Meadowfoam vanilla bean metheglin 3 gallon batch.
8# meadowfoam honey
4# orange blossom honey
4 whole vanilla beans
1 oz medium toasted oak chips or cubes
Cote de blanc yeast

I'm thinking of doing a primary fermentation without anything but honey and yeast and racking onto the oak and 2 beans for 8 days or so. Then racking off the chips onto the last two beans until its bottling time (8.5 months or whatever brings it to a year)

ChickenArise
May 12, 2010

POWER
= MEAT +
OPPORTUNITY
= BATTLEWORMS


It looks like I may have been overconfident in placing my IPA carboy so close to where my sour is. There's something that looks like a bit more than yeast rafts dusting the top of the liquid. It might just be yeast, though, which would be cool. I need to go to the homebrew shop for more dry hops and to get a new wine thief (melted my old one) so I can get a decent sample and figure out what is up. Even if I've got brett in there I think it'll turn out fine; my hop profile was low on the IBU and high on oily mango-y hops. As long as it isn't sick right now, I think it has a chance.

(The sour, on the other hand, I couldn't be more happy with, and my stout seems uninfected so far - I'm still playing with fire, though)

Jacobey000
Jul 17, 2005

We will be cruising at a speed of 55mph swiftly away from the twisted wreckage of my shattered life!

Angry Grimace posted:

It's a 12 day dry hop with staggered additions every three days and all of the hop additions are like an ounce or more.

cripes, that is a lot.


Marshmallow Blue posted:

Also I've got a mead idea to run by you folks. What do you think?
Meadowfoam vanilla bean metheglin 3 gallon batch.
8# meadowfoam honey
4# orange blossom honey
4 whole vanilla beans
1 oz medium toasted oak chips or cubes
Cote de blanc yeast

I'm thinking of doing a primary fermentation without anything but honey and yeast and racking onto the oak and 2 beans for 8 days or so. Then racking off the chips onto the last two beans until its bottling time (8.5 months or whatever brings it to a year)

As much as I like the idea of vanilla and oak mead - I'd be more inclined to use wild flower and do 1 gallon batch first. I have the feeling that the long soak from the vanilla, let alone the oak, is going to mask any subtly from any solo-style honey. So i'd say do a test batch before wasting a year and 12# of expensive honey.

ChickenArise posted:

It looks like I may have been overconfident in placing my IPA carboy so close to where my sour is. There's something that looks like a bit more than yeast rafts dusting the top of the liquid.

Could just be hops or how the yeast is flocculating - I'd not worry.

Marshmallow Blue
Apr 25, 2010


Well based on reading about what others have done online and reading in the appropriate texts. Both oak and vanilla age out to be very subtle. It looks like the vanilla starts off no matter how many you add to be almost too intense, but it should really mellow out along with the oak since the oak is so early in the aging.

Ill be okay with the cost and the amount of bottles ill get out of it if it just turns out just "okay" but I'll hate myself for doing a small batch and wanting more. I usually get about 3.5 bottles from a one gallon batch, so the that half gets drunk that night as a celebration. One gets shared with my brew club for their opinions and praise which won't leave much for me.

Plus I've got no free gallon carboys for small experiments. I think it should turn out well.

Edit: Also, I've found a decent place for meadowfoam honey at a decent price. It's called flying bee or something along those lines. And thanks to the wonders of flat rate boxes I can get my 12 pounds for a little over 65 with shipping.

Marshmallow Blue fucked around with this message at Jan 15, 2013 around 03:12

Midorka
Jun 10, 2011

I have a pretty fucking good palate, passed BJCP and level 2 cicerone which is more than half of you dudes can say, so I don't give a hoot anymore about this toxic community.


I brewed my first witbier almost two weeks ago but I have a question, is it okay to cold crash it? I have a fridge that can keep it in the 40s for a while but I'm worried it will lose it's cloudiness.

Cpt.Wacky
Apr 17, 2005


Don't forget your yeast nutrients. Descriptions of that yeast in mead says it's pretty important.

fullroundaction
Apr 20, 2007

Drink beer every day


Midorka posted:

I brewed my first witbier almost two weeks ago but I have a question, is it okay to cold crash it? I have a fridge that can keep it in the 40s for a while but I'm worried it will lose it's cloudiness.

For what it's worth I didn't cold crash mine (standard all-grain wit from NB) and it came out way too cloudy (IMO) even for the style.

Angry Grimace
Jul 29, 2010

ACTUALLY IT IS VERY GOOD THAT THE SHOW IS BAD AND ANYONE WHO DOESN'T REALIZE WHY THAT'S GOOD IS AN IDIOT. JUST ENJOY THE BAD SHOW INSTEAD OF THINKING.


So I decided to get the beer off of that hop matter, and racked to secondary (which I usually don't do), took a nap and came back and the airlock was on the floor. Sigh.

ScaerCroe
Oct 6, 2006
IRRITANT

I keep hearing about how you are not supposed to grind your grains until right before brewday, but is this honestly a problem? I don't want to buy a mill, and the homebrew shop in the city where I just moved only has a hand crank mill with a 4 pound hopper. A few times in the past I forgot about a batch that I had milled a couple of months ago, and they turned into perfectly respectable beers.

Cointelprofessional
Jul 2, 2007
Carrots: Make me an offer.

ChickenArise posted:

It looks like I may have been overconfident in placing my IPA carboy so close to where my sour is.

That doesn't matter. I keep all my sours and regular beers right next to each other. An IPA would kill most bacteria due to the hops. Plus it's unlikely for the sour to infect the other with the bacteria going in and out two air locks.

crazyfish
Sep 19, 2002



Midorka posted:

I brewed my first witbier almost two weeks ago but I have a question, is it okay to cold crash it? I have a fridge that can keep it in the 40s for a while but I'm worried it will lose it's cloudiness.

Cold crashing is for clarity and witbiers are cloudy. I'd leave it well alone and bottle as is.

Josh Wow
Feb 28, 2005

We need more beer up here!


crazyfish posted:

Cold crashing is for clarity and witbiers are cloudy. I'd leave it well alone and bottle as is.

For a dissenting opinion cold crashing it for 2-4 days is just gonna help the big stuff drop out and it'll still be plenty cloudy if you used a decent amount of wheat. I cold crash everything I can and I've only had one hefeweizen start to clear up after a 4 day cold crash and 4 weeks in the keg. All you have to do then is take the keg out and flip it upside down a few times if you want it cloudy.

ScaerCroe posted:

I keep hearing about how you are not supposed to grind your grains until right before brewday, but is this honestly a problem? I don't want to buy a mill, and the homebrew shop in the city where I just moved only has a hand crank mill with a 4 pound hopper. A few times in the past I forgot about a batch that I had milled a couple of months ago, and they turned into perfectly respectable beers.

This is one of those best practice things. It's best practice to grind your grains as close to when you're going to brew as possible, that way they're as fresh as they can be. But there's tons of people out there that mail order all their homebrew supplies and don't own mills, so clearly waiting a couple of weeks isn't the worst thing in the world.

Midorka
Jun 10, 2011

I have a pretty fucking good palate, passed BJCP and level 2 cicerone which is more than half of you dudes can say, so I don't give a hoot anymore about this toxic community.


Thanks for the replies, my main reason for wanting to cold crash is to get excess yeast out. It really hurts presentation to give a friend a beer you brewed only to have a layer of sediment on the bottom. It can be a little off-putting. I know it's a superficial reason but since I have the capabilities to cold crash I don't see a reason why I wouldn't. For what it's worth I used 45% flaked wheat and it's very cloudy with only a filter going from the kettle to carboy to get rid of hop and other matter in the body while aerating.

Question though, has anyone used Bell's immersion chiller? I can't find one cheaper and I'm not brewing again without one, the tub method is a pain in the rear end and I won't be doing that again after knowing how well this works.

fullroundaction
Apr 20, 2007

Drink beer every day


Midorka posted:

Question though, has anyone used Bell's immersion chiller? I can't find one cheaper and I'm not brewing again without one, the tub method is a pain in the rear end and I won't be doing that again after knowing how well this works.

Mine just arrived today, will post a trip report. Can't wait to play with it! Also ordered a ton of other little stuff from them (bottle caps, tea ball, random 1oz hops) since they're strangely way cheaper than everyone else (even on shipping). Who knew.

--------------

Took a grav reading of 4 gallons of 1.056 grocery store cider that has been sitting on top of a leftover cake of Nottingham ale yeast for less than a week. It's already at 0.98. I'm mad about apparent attenuation once again ITT (IT'S A LIE PUT OUT BY BIG YEAST INC).

global tetrahedron
Jun 24, 2009



Made a robust porter back in October, aged it in a carboy for a month with Makers Mark-soaked oak cubes. Bottled with just 2.5 oz of priming sugar (5 gal batch), to keep the carbonation low since I knew I'd have a fair amount of bottles laying around for awhile.

It tasted so nice and malty and was just right carbonation-wise through December, but opened one a few days ago and it was almost like Coca-Cola or something, fizzy and unpleasant. I don't know what happened, after about a week in bottles at ~68, I put all the bottles in a pretty cold basement, because at that point the batch was on the threshold of where I wanted the beer to be carbonation-wise.

What could have happened? Is this just what happens, an exponential increase in carbonation? Is actually refrigerating the bottles one of the only ways to cause the cessation of carbonation? Barring the use of less priming sugar, how can I avoid this on future batches of maltier, less sessionable beers?

baquerd
Jul 2, 2007

by FactsAreUseless


Midorka posted:

Question though, has anyone used Bell's immersion chiller? I can't find one cheaper and I'm not brewing again without one, the tub method is a pain in the rear end and I won't be doing that again after knowing how well this works.

Yes, it works very well. The clamps leak a little but I may just not be putting them on right, it's just a standard hose/clamp setup and I can't see anything low quality about them. I did spread out the coils a bit to increase surface area, but it chills 4 gallons from boiling to 65 in 10 minutes.

Jo3sh
Oct 19, 2002

Like all girls I love unicorns!

Worm clamps on wort chiller tubing suck. No matter how much you tighten them this time, it will leak next time, or the time after at best. I strongly recommend upgrading to compression fittings - or even better, soldered fittings.

As far as cooling performance, there's a reason the coil of copper is so widely used - it's a very effective design.

Imasalmon
Mar 19, 2003

Meet me in the Hall of Fame

Nice brewday on Sunday.

14lbs Rauch Malt
1 oz Hallertau
A bigass starter of Wyeast 2042

Happily bubbling away at 50 degrees.

baquerd
Jul 2, 2007

by FactsAreUseless


Imasalmon posted:

Nice brewday on Sunday.

14lbs Rauch Malt
1 oz Hallertau
A bigass starter of Wyeast 2042

Happily bubbling away at 50 degrees.

14 pounds of smoked malt. Let us know if it's drinkable, I'm curious because I've done 15% of the grist and that lent a pronounced and noticeable smokiness.

Paladine_PSoT
Jan 2, 2010

If you have a problem Yo, I'll solve it



Anyone know a good resource for types of hops, descriptions, styles, complimenting hop flavors, et. cetera?

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internet celebrity
Jun 23, 2006


College Slice

Paladine_PSoT posted:

Anyone know a good resource for types of hops, descriptions, styles, complimenting hop flavors, et. cetera?

This chart doesn't have a ton of relevant information but it's a good start:



edit for hugeness

internet celebrity fucked around with this message at Jan 15, 2013 around 18:21

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