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Death of Rats
Oct 2, 2005

SQUEAK

Just drank a couple of bottles of the most drinkable ale I've made so far - a Mosaic Kveik ale. It's going down almost too easy, and I only started it on the 22nd of February. 16 days from boil to glass, and it's fabulous.

I bought some Voss Kveik yeast on a bit of a whim as it's supposed to be super quick to ferment and my stash was getting very low; it's marvelous stuff. I drank a crafty pint straight out of the fermenter while I was bottling (which was kinda under-carbed for my tastes but otherwise delicious).

1.5kg Amber DME
1 kg Pale DME
1.5kg Maris Otter Malt (steeped in 15l water at 68*C for about an hour; didn't bother sparging as I was feeling lazy).

Added roughly 5-6l extra water to the pan before the boil.
30g Mosaic (45 minutes)
1 Whirlfloc and 1/2 tsp yeast nutrient (10 minutes)
70g Mosaic (0 minutes)

4g Voss Kveik added at ~40*C

Fermented around the 28*C mark (wrapped two brew bands around it - I was hoping for nearer 35*C, but it's been cold recently and my brewing nook isn't in a warm bit of the house). Bottled after 6 days.

Next time, I'll probably skip steeping the Maris Otter (I threw it in because I had it lying around), and just pop in another kilo of pale DME. And do a half-hour boil. An hour's effort for a beer this good seems like a good return on investment. Anyone who mostly makes extract or part-extract beers should definitely check this one out.

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Pillow Armadillo
Nov 14, 2005

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!"


Kraftwerk posted:


Some day I hope to attempt the White House Honey Ale recipe that was publicized back in the Obama administration. Has anyone tried making it?

Thanks for the lead on these recipes. There's actually two partial grain recipes archived for a honey ale and honey porter listed on whitehouse dot gov....how cool!

While I haven't brewed these (yet), I'd assume there's already room for tinkering with the recipe. At a glance, I'd probably look into that gypsum addition and adjust it to my local water profile, moreso to keep a chloride/sulfate ratio in style. From 2012 to now there's been a huge increase in yeast availability, too - swap that Danstar Windsor yeast for something else, but otherwise they look pretty approachable. When local honey is back in season, I'll give the Honey Ale recipe a go this year. Cheers!

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Danstar Windsor comes from Henley of Thames. Itís about the same as Wyeast 1275 and WLP Burton. Iíd guess the gypsum for matching closer to the Burton water profile. The recipes look good too, but Iíve never gotten around to brewing them myself.

boba fetacheese
Dec 12, 2000


Hope I'm not too late for english ale posting but i highly recommend everyone make this: http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2017/03/lets-brew-1946-tetley-mild.html. It's such a nice easy drinker, easy bill of ingredients and my favourite of the old recipes I've tried.

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


boba fetacheese posted:

Hope I'm not too late for english ale posting but i highly recommend everyone make this: http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2017/03/lets-brew-1946-tetley-mild.html. It's such a nice easy drinker, easy bill of ingredients and my favourite of the old recipes I've tried.

haha, I haven't even started to brew yet so you're going to have to hear about them for a while

I put in an order for the Anvil burner and I picked up a propane tank today.

I'm still on the fence about what to do about a fermenter, I keep talking myself in circles. The Anvil brew bucket is super affordable but I see some complaints about the valve being non-detachable and hard to clean (and they are out of stock at the moment). The SS Brewtech brew bucket has a much more pronounced bottom like a real conical and probably a nicer valve, but still not butterfly. The Spike Flex+ is really growing on me, $400 to get started with something I could upgrade with a temperature-control jacket and do pressurized transfers in is really a pretty solid deal. You can get it upgraded for less than the Chronical BME, and the Chronical doesn't do pressurized transfers. The BME does have a trub dump but that's a mixed bag since it increases the height of the unit, you could put a Flex in a freezer but the Chronical is so tall that's never going to work, you have to use the temperature control system. And of course you can go all the way to the unitank, which does have a 14 gallon option, which mitigates some of the expense I think (1 fully upgraded unitank is about as much as two fully upgraded Flex+), and it's overall still a nicer unit.

I don't really want to spend the dough for a unitank right out of the gate, but the Flex+ is sounding really attractive when I look at what you're getting in terms of features, and two of them is also more flexible than one big tank if I want to do two different beers at once. Or just buy the Anvil and move up later. Or the SS Brewtech. Or the flex+...

(thinking the flex+ sounds nice overall, maybe I'll talk myself into it as a tax season splurge. Really wish they'd offer it in a 14 gallon version though, that would be perfect, maybe they will sometime later and I can get one of those too and share accessories.)

Paul MaudDib fucked around with this message at 08:14 on Mar 10, 2021

thotsky
Jun 7, 2005

hot to trot


You can do pressurized transfers with any of the SS stuff, even the brew bucket, just keep the pressure really really low.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Paul MaudDib posted:

I'm still on the fence about what to do about a fermenter, I keep talking myself in circles.

This is exactly what Iím wondering as well. Right now Iím looking pretty heavily at the Blichmann Cornical Unitank because you can drain the trub and then just flip it over, screw on a bottom, and turn it into a corny keg. I like the idea of getting a minifridge and turning it into a keg fridge to control fermentation temperature and reduce contamination risk from transfers. I also really like that inkbird temperature controller tater salad posted a page or two back. This is something Iím really enjoying and want to get better at so I can do more interesting things, and Iím really trying to learn what I can control with better equipment that would pay dividends right off the bat.

more falafel please posted:

Personally I use a minifridge with a temperature controller and a reptile heating pad. It's not perfect, because I can only temp control one batch at a time, and only certain fermenters fit in it, but I've been using it for 8 years or so.

Are you using the inkbird controller to intermittently power the heater element and fridge from on probe feedback? Iíd just like to know more about your setup... The more I read and understand this seems like the way to go, and the next step up is glycol jacketing with very expensive fermentation vats?

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster



OSU_Matthew posted:

This is exactly what Iím wondering as well. Right now Iím looking pretty heavily at the Blichmann Cornical Unitank because you can drain the trub and then just flip it over, screw on a bottom, and turn it into a corny keg. I like the idea of getting a minifridge and turning it into a keg fridge to control fermentation temperature and reduce contamination risk from transfers. I also really like that inkbird temperature controller tater salad posted a page or two back. This is something Iím really enjoying and want to get better at so I can do more interesting things, and Iím really trying to learn what I can control with better equipment that would pay dividends right off the bat.


Are you using the inkbird controller to intermittently power the heater element and fridge from on probe feedback? Iíd just like to know more about your setup... The more I read and understand this seems like the way to go, and the next step up is glycol jacketing with very expensive fermentation vats?

Yeah, it's not an inkbird, it's a hack-job STC-1000, because the inkbird didn't exist (or at least wasn't common in homebrew internet) at the time. But if I did it again, I'd absolutely use an inkbird. The temp controller turns on and off the fridge and heater as it needs to, and it works really well. The reptile heat pad is cheap and only puts out a little bit of heat, so I'm not worried about it as a fire hazard or anything, it really just gets warm. In an insulated minifridge, a little heat adds up pretty quickly.

calandryll
Apr 25, 2003

Ask me where I do my best drinking!



Pillbug

Reptile wire also works great and allows you to spread the heating over the entire chamber. I think I bought a 15 ft one that can easily get my minifridge up to 90 degrees.

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


where do people generally shop online for this and that? I have an Adventures in Homebrewing locally (and of course I can order online) and the prices seem OK especially when they're running one of their 20% off-ish promos (currently $20 off $100, I've seen $10 off $50, etc) but a lot of the big-ticket items like Blichmann, SS Brewtech, kegerators, etc are not allowed on those promos. For other stuff it seems like Morebeer has pretty good prices?

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Those are both good. If you have AiH close, youíll win on the big items because of not paying for shipping. You might be in the ritebrew speedy delivery area too. For ingredients you could branch out, but youíre pretty much covered for it already. Iíve always been able to find everything except unique and special release yeast/bacteria from those places. But if youíre not into mixed fermentation or very specific yeasts then theyíll have you covered. Otherwise you may need to find the specific shops that carry those specific strains. Regular ale and lager yeasts are basically everywhere, so no harm going with the closest.

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster



AIH has a points system that you can use to get some discounts on Blichmann, etc. I'm not local to AIH but I have ordered a lot from them. I like RiteBrew, MoreBeer, and Williams Brewing, etc.

https://www.homebrewfinds.com/ lists sales from the big homebrew outlets, as well as random stuff like Amazon sales for minor equipment like fittings/o-rings and random stuff that's useful like bus tubs, spray bottles, etc.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Paul MaudDib posted:

where do people generally shop online for this and that? I have an Adventures in Homebrewing locally (and of course I can order online) and the prices seem OK especially when they're running one of their 20% off-ish promos (currently $20 off $100, I've seen $10 off $50, etc) but a lot of the big-ticket items like Blichmann, SS Brewtech, kegerators, etc are not allowed on those promos. For other stuff it seems like Morebeer has pretty good prices?

I just ordered a Blichmann G2 Kettle from MoreBeer, though it hasnít shipped yet. I signed up for their newsletter and got a 10$ coupon code, and I also noticed that if I checked out as a guest vs signing in, shipping was 13$ vs 30 something (YMMV).

Which, speaking of newsletter coupon codes, protip for gmail haversóif youíre signing up for something that you think is gonna be spammey, you can put +whatever at the end of your id (before @gmail) and itíll still go to your inbox while ignoring the + and anything after it, so you can apply rules to filter. Eg myname+newsletter@gmail.com resolves to myname@gmail.com, and you can just tag and auto archive everything sent to that +address. I like doing it to see who sold my email, eg myname+vendor coming from something else entirely is always fun.

Anyways

more falafel please posted:

Yeah, it's not an inkbird, it's a hack-job STC-1000, because the inkbird didn't exist (or at least wasn't common in homebrew internet) at the time. But if I did it again, I'd absolutely use an inkbird. The temp controller turns on and off the fridge and heater as it needs to, and it works really well. The reptile heat pad is cheap and only puts out a little bit of heat, so I'm not worried about it as a fire hazard or anything, it really just gets warm. In an insulated minifridge, a little heat adds up pretty quickly.

Do you have the fridge drilled for a keg tap, or is it just intact for controlling fermentation temps?

So Iím trying to learn more about carbonation in a single vessel fermentation. If I were to use a single vessel for fermentation, would I switch from an airlock to a spunding valve after draining the trub? Would that generally carbonate the beer without the need for priming sugar after fermentation or forced gas carbonation, or is a bit of either still necessary?

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


more falafel please posted:

AIH has a points system that you can use to get some discounts on Blichmann, etc. I'm not local to AIH but I have ordered a lot from them. I like RiteBrew, MoreBeer, and Williams Brewing, etc.

nope, anything with a minimum advertised price is completely excluded from accruing rewards points.

quote:

Rewards Program
Some items are not included in our Rewards Program due to MAP pricing guidelines. Excluded items: Blichmann items, Anvil items, Ruby Street items, Speidel items, Ss Brewtech items, Grainfather items, Kegerators and Winery Grade Fermenters. If an item page does not indicate the number of reward points to be awarded upon purchase, then the item does not qualify for rewards. Full details of our rewards program can be viewed here: AIH Rewards Program.

hence me asking about pricing at other places, because despite their hardline stance on MAP, other places are often cheaper, so if you aren't even getting rewards points you might as well shop around. Just wondering if there's any places that are reliably cheap for non-perishable stuff - really doesn't matter if some spare airlocks or whatever take a week to get to you.

Paul MaudDib fucked around with this message at 02:48 on Mar 11, 2021

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




Not sure about your specific stuff but maybe williams? They had my anvil stsinlesst fermenter for less than anyone else (and also had it in stock)

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

So it looks like brew in a bag is the way to go for getting started with all grain, right?

Reading a bit about stuff and trying to understand things like efficiency, is it common for people to eventually get their own grain mill and process grains themselves, or do most people just stick with what they get from the lhbs?

Once our new fridge comes in Iím hoping to convert the old one into a temperature controlled fermentation chamber, though I think the next batch is just going to get plopped in the basement for now. I ordered the cornical fermenter and spunding valve from MoreBeer, but thereís no telling when that or the G2 will be coming in... just crossing my fingers and hoping itíll be before the next brewday.

Iím looking at hop spiders right now, and I was wondering if there were any recommendations for how to best contain hops? I see stuff like dip tube filters, hop blockers, or screened hop spiders, and I was wondering if there was any consensus on standouts or benefits between the types?

Or would it be better to skip hop spiders and whirlpool to collect hops and detritus in a cone before transferring to fermentation? Does an immersion chiller cause issues with whirlpooling? Whatís the best way to accomplish it?

Very interested to know what other people do... I love IPAs and once I get some recipes under my belt the plan is to go up to my eyeballs with hops.

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


OSU_Matthew posted:

This is exactly what Iím wondering as well. Right now Iím looking pretty heavily at the Blichmann Cornical Unitank because you can drain the trub and then just flip it over, screw on a bottom, and turn it into a corny keg. I like the idea of getting a minifridge and turning it into a keg fridge to control fermentation temperature and reduce contamination risk from transfers. I also really like that inkbird temperature controller tater salad posted a page or two back. This is something Iím really enjoying and want to get better at so I can do more interesting things, and Iím really trying to learn what I can control with better equipment that would pay dividends right off the bat.

that's some out of the box thinking, and I think it's technically pretty sound. I will note that while the transfer is oxygen-free (CO2 is heavier than O2 and "falls" into the bottom of the "cup" formed by the keg), it's also atmospheric-pressure, so you will blow all your keg pressure after you dump the trub and unscrew the bottom. Think of it like opening a bottle of soda - it doesn't necessarily go flat instantly, but you do lose a big blast of pressure there. And $130 per keg is pretty pricey overall even at the 2-3 kegs scale.

I feel like the real contenders are the Anvil BrewBucket as the "shut up and brew" option, and the Flex+ as the long-term buy. I kinda suspect the right answer is to suck it up and get the flex+.

The brew bucket can be temp controlled too, you just put it in a keezer. Which adds about $160 plus whatever the thermostat and heater add, so not all that much less than a temp control kit for a flex+. You can potentially get more multipurpose use out of a keezer vs a plain old temp control kit, like putting kegs in there to chill and so on. The brew bucket is cheaper, but the Flex+ is a technically nicer unit with pressure fermentation and butterfly valves and so on. The Flex+ is closer to the unitank models in a lot of practical aspects.

Paul MaudDib fucked around with this message at 07:22 on Mar 13, 2021

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




OSU_Matthew posted:

So it looks like brew in a bag is the way to go for getting started with all grain, right?

Reading a bit about stuff and trying to understand things like efficiency, is it common for people to eventually get their own grain mill and process grains themselves, or do most people just stick with what they get from the lhbs?

Once our new fridge comes in Iím hoping to convert the old one into a temperature controlled fermentation chamber, though I think the next batch is just going to get plopped in the basement for now. I ordered the cornical fermenter and spunding valve from MoreBeer, but thereís no telling when that or the G2 will be coming in... just crossing my fingers and hoping itíll be before the next brewday.

Iím looking at hop spiders right now, and I was wondering if there were any recommendations for how to best contain hops? I see stuff like dip tube filters, hop blockers, or screened hop spiders, and I was wondering if there was any consensus on standouts or benefits between the types?

Or would it be better to skip hop spiders and whirlpool to collect hops and detritus in a cone before transferring to fermentation? Does an immersion chiller cause issues with whirlpooling? Whatís the best way to accomplish it?

Very interested to know what other people do... I love IPAs and once I get some recipes under my belt the plan is to go up to my eyeballs with hops.

I've just started BIAB so maybe not the best for these answers. Yes you may lose some efficiency doing a BIAB since you aren't sparging, I tend to still "sparge" since I've got a kettle with a drop in BIAB cylinder. I pull the cylinder up and out of my water and then slowly pour some water heated on the stove over it. I've had decent results form my LHBS grinds but it will 100% be dependent on the grind from your LHBS. I felt like why not get a grain mill too, because GADGETS! I grabbed "the Crop duster" from austin homebrewing, it was 80bucks so after I mill like 400lbs I'll have saved my money on the .20/lb surcharge my store charges for grain. Mostly I got it so I can buy base grains in bulk and save a little / store it for longer

Tip for BIAB: Keep a pound or two of dry malt extract to style (pale or dark usually) so if you miss the target gravity just add some DME it to hit it.

No clue on hop spiders I just usually add with a sock or toss it in since my kettle has a ball valve on the bottom that helps me keep the junk on the bottom when I transfer to fermenter.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


OSU_Matthew posted:

So it looks like brew in a bag is the way to go for getting started with all grain, right?

BIAB is a fine method, but you can start with any system you put together. Youíd never need to Ďupgradeí with BIAB, so it depends how you want to do things long term.

Thereís rarely a perfect piece of equipment either. There are lots that work, and lots that do what they do well, but only in certain situations. Itís a matter of finding out what works best for you and your budget and thatís a much more difficult proposal.

Like for IPAs with a ton of hops, a hop spider may not work as itíll only hold 3-4oz of hops maybe. So to go up to your eyeballs suggests that youíll be using half a pound and they wonít fit. So maybe youíll want to find a whirlpool method to get your hops to mound in the center of the kettle and away from your valve. Or maybe you stick a false bottom in to catch as much as possible too. What works perfect for me may not for you.

But hereís my method: I have a mash screen that catches a lot of the pellet hops and protein break and the whirlpool stacks up most of the rest. When I use leaf hops it catches almost everything. My kettle screens are heavy gauge and were made by a LHBS owner that closed, so you might not like the one you have for it and just use the whirlpool. My immersion chiller doesnít get in the way, but itís home made loose copper coil version too. So maybe if you have a really tight coil that doesnít let stuff into the middle then maybe yours might a little. Thereís ways around all these things, but itís part of the learning process to find the one that works for you.

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



Iíve been thinking about kegging a bit. My problem is I donít really want to get a dedicated keg fridge/freezer since Iím in an apartment. Not that I canít, itís just Iíd rather keep things simple in my apartment for now.

One thing I was thinking of doing though was splitting up my 2.5 gal batches into two smaller kegs, since Iím pretty sure I can fit one of the small 1.5 gal kegs in my current fridge in one of my crisper drawers or something.

The problem would be that Iíd end up keeping the other half at room temp. Iím sure thatís not good, but would it be much worse than keeping bottles at room temp after priming?

The other problem would be the gas handling. It would be nice to not have to get two tanks, two regulators, etc. I donít know much about kegging though, would it be possible to prepare one of the kegs for room-temp storage after disconnection?

Anyway I donít know much about kegging so I thought Iíd ask for feedback on that idea.

Rectovagitron
Mar 13, 2007




Grimey Drawer

I squeezed a keezer into a small Brooklyn apartment. It's not easy, but it was better than giving up grocery space in my apartment fridge, for me.

I have a friend who does the mini keg thing in his apartment fridge, and is happy with it. Honestly, I'd do that and just make small batches. The more I brew the less I want 5 gallons of the same beer.

Storing finished beer in a co2 purged keg at room temperature should be totally fine. I think (but don't know) that's how many bars get their beer. Either way, I am pretty sure most of the worst off flavors come from temperature swings during fermentation. Someone please tell me if I'm way off.

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster



Warmer temps will speed all processes other than clarification, basically, so if you've got a lot of oxygen exposure, keeping the beer at warmer temps will cause it to oxidize faster. All things being equal, cold is better than warm, but storing a keg at room temp is not a problem if you're being careful about O2, purging the keg with CO2, etc.

Johnny-on-the-Spot
Apr 17, 2015

That feeling when he opens
the door for you


I finshed up my blue moon clone this sunday, ended up bottling all five gallons. I was gonna split it and fruit 2 gallons in another pail, but didn't realize I only had one top. That one is being taken up by my orange wine that just wrapped up primary fermentation. The orange wine taste pretty good so far! It's still got alot of months of conditioning to go, but it hasnt gotten any of that vomit taste I was warned about.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Johnny-on-the-Spot posted:

I finshed up my blue moon clone this sunday, ended up bottling all five gallons. I was gonna split it and fruit 2 gallons in another pail, but didn't realize I only had one top. That one is being taken up by my orange wine that just wrapped up primary fermentation. The orange wine taste pretty good so far! It's still got alot of months of conditioning to go, but it hasnt gotten any of that vomit taste I was warned about.

Very glad to hear that! Butyric Acid is nasty stuff to smell and taste. It sounds like you managed your process well enough to not have bacterial or oxygen issues that might have caused it. The only time I've smelled it in my brewing was when some of the mash got left somewhere and I found it a couple days later. Keep it tight and away from oxygen and I hope you have a great product at the end of it.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Settled on the whirlpool master paddle from Norcal Brewing Solutions. Figure Iíll just spin it up after chilling, pop the kettle lid on, and drain to the fermentation vessel after 15-20 minutes. I especially like the idea that itíll add aeration to the wort, and it should be easier to clean than a hop spider

I feel like Iím so impatient to brew another batch... Iíve no idea when the my larger kettle or conical fermenter will come in, so Iím thinking Iíll just pick up another extract batch this weekend to make something... Iíd love to do a Saison or Belgian style. Even though I have a smaller kettle Imma try stopping boilover on hopping by cutting the heat altogether.

Still trying to figure out where to store everything and set up a good brewing space, especially for cleaning large vessels that donít do well with the kitchen sink. Iíve got a plastic utility sink I could set up outside and thread into a garden hose adapter... would this be sanitary enough to do an initial clean of the dishes and fill up a bucket for Star San for sanitation?

Do you guys have any recommendations on unscented dish soap to use for general cleaning equipment that wonít film or leave flavors?

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Oxyclean Free. Itís in the laundry detergent section of your stores. It works similar to pbw and can be used on all stainless and glass. It will cause copper to react, so donít leave copper to soak in it.

I like that whirlpool device too. Just go slow with it and donít aerate your hot wort. Once itís cooled go nuts and get that air inside it. That stainless mesh looks like what my false bottoms are cut out of too.

honda whisperer
Mar 29, 2009



What happens if you aerate hot wort?

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


honda whisperer posted:

What happens if you aerate hot wort?

It can cause oxidation (cardboard yum), but isnít guaranteed to do so. One of those things that can depend on scale a bit. A little isnít going to destroy the beer but itís also not going to hurt to be a little more gentle for 5-10 minutes with the $30-40 and 6 hours spent.

honda whisperer
Mar 29, 2009



Thanks, going to be a bit more gentle cooling wort next time.

Learn something new everyday.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


honda whisperer posted:

Thanks, going to be a bit more gentle cooling wort next time.

Learn something new everyday.

You're pretty safe once it gets under 130 if I remember right? It's when it's very hot and you've just boiled out all the oxygen where you want to be careful as it'll be able to take more than it can when it's closer to fermenting temp. A sufficiently vigorous and quick fermentation is going to probably use all the oxygen you add, but a slow yeast, or underpitching is more likely to leave the oxygen in longer and may cause issues. So using healthy and enough yeast cells will do a good job helping protect against the possibility of oxidation.

gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


Uh isn't it the opposite? You can get more gas into water the lower the temperature is which is why colder beer needs lower pressures to get the same carbonation level. If you're going to try to get air into your wort, may as well do it when it will actually hold it. Either way, oxidation (and many other things) is largely overblown in the homebrewing community simply because industrial brewers do it that way. People will complain about to much oxygen in their beer while simultaneously pumping pure o2 into their wort. Unless you're making some massively hopped ipa, you'll probably never notice

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster



gwrtheyrn posted:

Uh isn't it the opposite? You can get more gas into water the lower the temperature is which is why colder beer needs lower pressures to get the same carbonation level. If you're going to try to get air into your wort, may as well do it when it will actually hold it. Either way, oxidation (and many other things) is largely overblown in the homebrewing community simply because industrial brewers do it that way. People will complain about to much oxygen in their beer while simultaneously pumping pure o2 into their wort. Unless you're making some massively hopped ipa, you'll probably never notice

I think the argument about hot-side aeration is that the oxidation reactions take place faster at higher temperatures, so there's significant oxidation that happens before pitch, even before boiling and driving off oxygen. I'm willing to believe it's possible, but I'm not going to do all the wacky LoDO poo poo to try to mitigate it.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


more falafel please posted:

I think the argument about hot-side aeration is that the oxidation reactions take place faster at higher temperatures, so there's significant oxidation that happens before pitch, even before boiling and driving off oxygen. I'm willing to believe it's possible, but I'm not going to do all the wacky LoDO poo poo to try to mitigate it.

Yeah, it binds at a different rate instead of being dissolved in solution. I try to always say it ďcanĒ instead of it ďwillĒ too, so if I missed one then read it generously please.

The reaction is possible, but the comment about extra hoppy things is why it can, but even there the temp and amount is going to be important, as too a bunch of other variables. Itís not something difficult to minimize to reasonable levels either, but going full LODO isnít necessary. You really can just do things like not use a vigorous whisk in your boiling wort right at flameout and realistically youíll be fine.

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster



I know one guy who goes full LoDO for lagers, and he does make very good lagers, but he made good lagers before he started doing that, too. He also spunds and does closed transfers, so there's no O2 exposure after pitching, which seems like it would have much more of an effect.

gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


Jhet posted:

You really can just do things like not use a vigorous whisk in your boiling wort right at flameout and realistically youíll be fine.

I mean even if you do you'll probably be fine. Many practices we take for granted come from commercial brewing where things like throughput and shelf life are extremely important from a business perspective, but at the homebrew scale are just not all that relevant. It may be "better" to do so, but in most cases, if you don't feel like doing it, you will never notice the difference at the scale and time you'll actually be drinking it. At the end of the day, it's hobby and you should do it however you want--if you think it's a pain in the rear end just don't do it, but if you want to go all out and try to make everything perfect that's fine too.

Like all of my beers are "underpitched" by commercial standards, and I'd imagine that's extremely common in homebrewing yet people make great beer all the time. I'm likely to never change this--basically everything I make gets a pack of of dry yeast, usually us-05, and that's it.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Jhet posted:

Oxyclean Free. Itís in the laundry detergent section of your stores. It works similar to pbw and can be used on all stainless and glass. It will cause copper to react, so donít leave copper to soak in it.

I like that whirlpool device too. Just go slow with it and donít aerate your hot wort. Once itís cooled go nuts and get that air inside it. That stainless mesh looks like what my false bottoms are cut out of too.

Awesome, thanks! Thanks for being perpetually helpful with all my stupid questions. This thread has been a really great resource and I really feel like Iíve already learned a lot since last brew day a few weeks ago.

Gonna run out to the lhbs tonight and pick up some odds and ends and an extract kit for this weekend since I donít know when the new kettle and fermenter will ship to try BIAB. I just ordered an Inkwell regulator and am gonna use the last of my menards rebate funbux to buy a chest freezer this evening. 5 CF is adequate for 3 corny kegs and C02 canister on the compressor hump, right? Figure Imma be fermenting in Corny kegs with the cornical and long term Iíll probably do a keezer conversion for serving.

Iím excited by the wifi Inkwell, gonna try and see if I can feed the logs into my local splunk instance and create a dashboard with some reminders and alerts

Iím glad I wasnít getting into this a year ago when chest freezers were impossible to come by

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster



OSU_Matthew posted:

Awesome, thanks! Thanks for being perpetually helpful with all my stupid questions. This thread has been a really great resource and I really feel like Iíve already learned a lot since last brew day a few weeks ago.

Gonna run out to the lhbs tonight and pick up some odds and ends and an extract kit for this weekend since I donít know when the new kettle and fermenter will ship to try BIAB. I just ordered an Inkwell regulator and am gonna use the last of my menards rebate funbux to buy a chest freezer this evening. 5 CF is adequate for 3 corny kegs and C02 canister on the compressor hump, right? Figure Imma be fermenting in Corny kegs with the cornical and long term Iíll probably do a keezer conversion for serving.

Iím excited by the wifi Inkwell, gonna try and see if I can feed the logs into my local splunk instance and create a dashboard with some reminders and alerts

Iím glad I wasnít getting into this a year ago when chest freezers were impossible to come by

I don't think 5CF will get you 3 kegs, typically, unless one of them is on the hump and you build a tall collar.

This thread on homebrewtalk has specs of most chest freezer models and various layouts of kegs/carboys/gas tanks: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/chest-freezer-specs-and-layouts.377518/

Also, if you're building a collar, you can keep the CO2 tank outside the freezer and put a hole for the gas line(s) through the collar if you want to save space inside.

Actually now that I'm reading that, the Danby 5.5CF freezer does apparently fit 3 ball locks on the floor, juuuust barely.

robotsinmyhead
Nov 29, 2005

Dude, they oughta call you Piledriver!



Clever Betty

I took a brewing hiatus kinda, but I finally got around to bottling my first try with Philly Sour and I'm pretty impressed with it.

2 of my standard 'beers' that are really popular and easy to make is a really simple 60-40 Pale/W. Wheat base that I have been souring normally with Goodbelly + Plantarum pills, then either co-pitching, pre-pitching, or post-pitching with whatever clean yeast I have on hand (US-05 usually). This method worked great, but the pellicle was a little gross to deal with and the beer always had a very detectable "bacterial" smell when first opening it.

Philly fixed all those issues. Although it's a slower yeast than a standard pitch, it's faster than the ferment + sour schedule I used before, comes out without a pellicle, and doesn't have any noticeable off-flavors. I kept it in my bathroom (so in the 72F range, where the house is at about 66F) but other than that, I didn't do much with temperature control.

The finished beer spent 8 days in a secondary bucket with peels from 7 limes and an oak spiral that was soaked in Resposado Tequila. It's definitely the best fermented thing I've ever made, but I still stall at calling a beer because there are no added hops and it wasn't boiled. Almost Seltzer-like with very little residual malt sweetness, tart-but-not-sour, a just a touch of reminder of the tequila and oak.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

more falafel please posted:

I don't think 5CF will get you 3 kegs, typically, unless one of them is on the hump and you build a tall collar.

This thread on homebrewtalk has specs of most chest freezer models and various layouts of kegs/carboys/gas tanks: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/chest-freezer-specs-and-layouts.377518/

Also, if you're building a collar, you can keep the CO2 tank outside the freezer and put a hole for the gas line(s) through the collar if you want to save space inside.

Actually now that I'm reading that, the Danby 5.5CF freezer does apparently fit 3 ball locks on the floor, juuuust barely.

I went to look at freezers and pick one up last night and I see exactly what you mean! Unfortunately width constraints pushed me to the smaller chest freezer, but Iím going to have to build almost a foot of collar anyways to fit the Cornical in there, so a regular corny should fit on the hump with that adjustment. Iím hoping itíll be awhile before I get to multiple kegs and C02 anyways... at least 1-2 weeks at the rate Iíve been going

In the meantime, Iím working to get the freezer set up to ferment tomorrowís batch! Picked up a saison kit and also a pack of centennial hops with the idea of dry hopping it for something slightly different.

Since the advice is to skip transfer to a secondary fermentation chamber, what is the process for dry hopping?

a.) Should I just sprinkle in the hops after primary fermentation finishes and hope they settle into the trub so the racking cane doesnít clog up while transferring into the bottling bucket?

b.) Should I star san a muslin bag, sprinkle the hops in that, and drop the bag in after primary fermentation? If I do this, should I add a sanitized marble or two so the bag remains submerged? Would too many marbles sink the hops into the trub?

Is there a detriment for leaving dry hops in the secondary fermentation for more than 3-5 days? Eg should I add them right after primary fermentation or time it to x days before bottling?

Iíve got two containers I can ferment in, a larger plastic ale pail bucket and a 5 gallon glass carboy that came with a kettle I bought on Craigslist. Iím assuming the larger 6+ gallon pail would be the preferable fermentation chamber so I donít have to worry about excess krausen and swapping in a blowoff tube? I plan on making roughly five gallons which I figure doesnít leave much headspace in the carboy.

Thanks in advance!

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robotsinmyhead
Nov 29, 2005

Dude, they oughta call you Piledriver!



Clever Betty

OSU_Matthew posted:

Iíve got two containers I can ferment in, a larger plastic ale pail bucket and a 5 gallon glass carboy that came with a kettle I bought on Craigslist. Iím assuming the larger 6+ gallon pail would be the preferable fermentation chamber so I donít have to worry about excess krausen and swapping in a blowoff tube? I plan on making roughly five gallons which I figure doesnít leave much headspace in the carboy.

Thanks in advance!

Controversial advice - ditch the carboy and don't even look at it. It's useless for 5gal batches, they're kind of a pain to clean, they're heavy, and they break easily.

I have one that I exclusively use for mead. Spend the $8 next time you can and just get a proper bucket + lid with a port. Even if you only do one at a time, I think it's wise to have batch count +1 at all times so you can do things like Secondary, clarification, bottling, etc.

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